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Safety evaluation of food contact paper and board using chemical tests and in vitro bioassays: Role of known and unknown substances
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2010 (English)In: Food Additives and Contaminants, ISSN 0265-203X, E-ISSN 1464-5122, Vol. 27, no 3, 406-115 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In vitro toxicological tests have been proposed as an approach to complement the chemical safety assessment of food contact materials, particularly those with a complex or unknown chemical composition such as paper and board. Among the concerns raised regarding the applicability of in vitro tests are the effects of interference of the extractables on the outcome of the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity tests applied and the role of known compounds present in chemically complex materials, such as paper and board, either as constituents or contaminants. To answer these questions, a series of experiments were performed to assess the role of natural substances (wood extracts, resin acids), some additives (diisopropylnaphthalene, phthalates, acrylamide, fluorescent whitening agents) and contaminants (2,4-diaminotoluene, benzo[a]pyrene) in the toxicological profile of paper and board. These substances were individually tested or used to spike actual paper and board extracts. The toxic concentrations of diisopropylnaphthalenes and phthalates were compared with those actually detected in paper and board extracts showing conspicuous toxicity. According to the results of the spiking experiments, the extracts did not affect the toxicity of tested chemicals nor was there any significant metabolic interference in the cases where two compounds were used in tests involving xenobiotic metabolism by the target cells. While the identified substances apparently have a role in the cytotoxicity of some of the project samples, their presence does not explain the total toxicological profile of the extracts. In conclusion, in vitro toxicological testing can have a role in the safety assessment of chemically complex materials in detecting potentially harmful activities not predictable by chemical analysis alone.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 27, no 3, 406-115 p.
Keyword [en]
Bioassay, Cytotoxicity, Food contact materials, Mutagenic compounds, Packaging, Toxicology
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-29572DOI: 10.1080/19440040903401358Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-76649129366OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-29572DiVA: diva2:1095728
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cited By 14

Available from: 2017-05-15 Created: 2017-05-15 Last updated: 2017-05-15Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
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  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • Other locale
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