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The influence of food emulsifiers on fat and sugar dispersions in oils. I. Adsorption, sedimentation
YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
1992 (English)In: Journal of the American Oil Chemists Society, ISSN 0003-021X, E-ISSN 1558-9331, Vol. 69, 705-717 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The adsorption isotherms of several emulsifiers to fat and sugar crystals dispersed in oils have been determined. Further, the influence of the emulsifiers on the interactions between the crystals has been estimated in sedimention experiments, where an increased sediment volume due to adsorption corresponds to an increased adhesion between the crystals and vice versa. Most of the emulsifiers examined adsorb weakly to fat crystals and form tight monolayers, resulting in increased adhesion between the crystals at high concentrations. On the other hand, loosely packed layers are formed at low concentrations, and a decreased adhesion is observed. Unsaturated monoglycerides and phospholipids cause a decrease in adhesion for all concentrations examined. The emulsifiers adsorb more strongly to sugar crystals than to fat crystals and form tightly packed monolayers with hydrocarbon chains directed to the oil. The crystals are then stabilized sterically - the adhesion between them is weaker and the sediments are more compact. At low concentrations the opposite behaviour often occurs. Monoglycerides interact in a specific way with sugar and cause an increased adhesion between the crystals for all concentrations examined. Phospholipids reduce the adhesion between sugar crystals, resulting in much denser sediments. Saturated monoglycerides in amounts over the solubility limit, tend to precipitate as a network between fat or sugar crystals, which causes bulky sediments and results in better stability against oiling out.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1992. Vol. 69, 705-717 p.
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-26999OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-26999DiVA: diva2:1054002
Note
A757Available from: 2016-12-08 Created: 2016-12-08Bibliographically approved

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