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Trapped non-equilibrium states in aqueous solutions of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes and surfactants: effects of mixing protocol and salt concentration
YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
2005 (English)In: Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, ISSN 0927-7757, E-ISSN 1873-4359, Vol. 253, 83-93 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The very slow equilibration time in oppositely charged systems makes it necessary to control not only the concentration of the species but also the details of the mixing process. This has been demonstrated for processes occurring at interfaces where order of addition effects can be of great importance. In this investigation we set out to study the bulk properties of aqueous mixtures of a highly charged cationic polyelectrolyte mixed with an anionic surfactant with the aim to learn if long-lived non-equilibrium states were formed also in this case, and thus if the details of the mixing procedure would affect the structure of the aggregates formed. For simplicity we chose two mixing protocols, denoted “PTS” and “STP”. In the PTS-method the polyelectrolyte is added to the surfactant solution whereas in the STP-method the surfactant is added into the polyelectrolyte solution. The properties of the mixtures in aqueous solutions, with different NaCl concentrations and as a function of time, were followed by conducting turbidity, electrophoretic mobility and dynamic light scattering measurements. The results demonstrate that the mixing protocol indeed has a great impact on the size of the aggregates initially formed and that this size difference persists for long times. Hence, trapped non-equilibrium states do play an important role also in the bulk solution. We found that in excess surfactant solutions the smaller aggregates formed by the STP-method are more resistant than the larger ones formed by the PTS-method to colloidal instability induced by electrolytes (NaCl). Based on our results we suggest that for producing small and stable polyelectrolyte–surfactant aggregates in systems with excess surfactant, the surfactant should be added last, while the opposite should be applied for systems with excess polyelectrolyte.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 253, 83-93 p.
Keyword [en]
Polyelectrolyte, surfactant, polyelectrolyte–surfactant complex, polyelectrolyte–surfactant aggregate, polyelectrolyte–surfactant association, turbidity, electrophoretic mobility, dynamic light scattering, dolloidal stability, non-equilibrium state, trapped state, polydispersity
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-26427OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-26427DiVA: diva2:1053429
Note
A1713Available from: 2016-12-08 Created: 2016-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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