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Electrification of Biorefinery Concepts for Improved Productivity—Yield, Economic and GHG Performances
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4909-6643
Bioshare AB, Sweden.
Bioshare AB, Sweden.
KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
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2023 (English)In: Energies, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 16, no 21, article id 7436Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Demand for biofuels will likely increase, driven by intensifying obligations to decarbonize aviation and maritime sectors. Sustainable biomass is a finite resource, and the forest harvesting level is a topic of ongoing discussions, in relation to biodiversity preservation and the short-term role of forests as carbon sinks. State-of-the-art technologies for converting lignocellulosic feedstock into transportation biofuels achieves a carbon utilization rate ranging from 25% to 50%. Mature technologies like second-generation ethanol and gasification-based processes tend to fall toward the lower end of this spectrum. This study explores how electrification can enhance the carbon efficiency of biorefinery concepts and investigates its impact on energy, economics and greenhouse gas emissions. Results show that electrification increases carbon efficiency from 28% to 123% for gasification processes, from 28% to 45% for second-generation ethanol, and from 50% to 65% for direct liquefaction processes. Biofuels are produced to a cost range 60–140 EUR/MWh-biofuel, depending on the chosen technology pathway, feedstock and electricity prices. Notably, production in electrified biorefineries proves cost-competitive when compared to pure electrofuel (E-fuels) tracks. Depending on the selected technology pathway and the extent of electrification, a reduction in GHG emissions ranging from 75% to 98% is achievable, particularly when powered by a low-carbon electricity mix. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023. Vol. 16, no 21, article id 7436
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Environmental Engineering
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URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-67912DOI: 10.3390/en16217436Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85176355971OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-67912DiVA, id: diva2:1814686
Note

This research was carried out within the collaborative research program Renewable transportation fuels and systems (Förnybara drivmedel och system), Project No. 50452-1. The project has been financed by the Swedish Energy Agency and f3—Swedish Knowledge Centre for Renewable Transportation Fuels. We acknowledge for in kind contribution and expertise from St1, Södra and Vattenfall AB.

Available from: 2023-11-27 Created: 2023-11-27 Last updated: 2023-11-27Bibliographically approved

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Mesfun, SennaiFurusjö, Erik

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