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EBOB – Solcelleinstallasjonar på bygg: Eksperimentell studie av brannspreiing i holrom bak solcellemodular på skrå takflater
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire and Safety.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2164-940x
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire and Safety.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8413-7500
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire and Safety.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0979-2369
2022 (Norwegian)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

EBOB - Solar cell installations on buildings. Experimental study of fire spread in cavity behind solar cell modules on pitched roof surfaces.

This report describes a total of 29 experiments where the fire spread in the cavity behind solar cell modules on pitched roof surfaces were studied. The experiments were performed at RISE Fire Research's laboratory in Trondheim in 2021. The series of experiments was carried out to investigate how a fire on a pitched roof surface will be affected by the presence of solar cell modules installed parallel to the roof surface. Simulated steel solar cell modules were used for all experiments. In a small-scale experimental setup, it was studied how different distances (6, 9, 12 and 15 cm) between the simulated solar cell module and the roof surface affect the fire spread at two different wind speeds (2 and 4 m/s). In a medium-scale experimental setup, it was studied how the fire spread was affected by the size of the initial fire. Finally, in a large-scale experimental setup, it was studied how the fire spread occurs on a roof surface with dimensions in the same order of magnitude as for a roof on a small house. The results show that solar cell modules mounted parallel to the roof surface on pitched roofs can affect the fire dynamics of a fire on the roof surface. The findings from the experiments indicate that there is a correlation between the distance from the roof surface to the solar cell module and how large initial fire is needed for the fire to spread. In the small-scale experiments with a small initial fire, it was not found that the simulated solar cell module affected the extent of damage when the distance between the module and the roof surface was greater than 9 cm. For experiments performed in an intermediate-scale setup, it was found that with a larger initial fire, the fire could spread even when there was 12 cm between the roof surface and the simulated solar cell module. The two large-scale experiments also showed fire spread under the simulated solar cell modules with a UL crib (a standardized fire source) used as the initial fire. The extent of the damaged area on the roof surface was similar for the two experiments, even though the wind direction was different. In both experiments, the fire spread below two rows of simulated solar modules and all the way to the ridge. The heat transfer inwards in the roof construction were greater in the experiments with a simulated solar cell module present than without. It increases with a reduced distance between the roof surface and the simulated solar cell module. Directly below the initial fire, no substantially increased thermal stress was observed on the underlying structure when a simulated solar cell module was installed. The thermal stress, on the other hand, increased to a greater extent because of the fire on the roof surface becoming more extensive when the simulated solar cell module was installed. There was a relatively low temperature increase measured under the chipboard behind the roof covering, which indicates that there was no immediate danger of fire spreading inwards into the roof structure directly through the 22 mm thick chipboard.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2022. , p. 42
Series
RISE Rapport ; 2022:83
Keywords [en]
BAPV, PV, PV module, PV installation, PV panel, PV system, Photovoltaics
National Category
Building Technologies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-60315ISBN: 978-91-89711-23-5 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-60315DiVA, id: diva2:1702486
Available from: 2022-10-11 Created: 2022-10-11 Last updated: 2023-06-07Bibliographically approved

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Stölen, ReidarFjærestad, Janne SirenFjellgaard Mikalsen, Ragni

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