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Assessing seafood nutritional diversity together with climate impacts informs more comprehensive dietary advice
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3853-9031
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0522-3591
Dalhousie University, Canada; Aquaculture Stewardship Council, Netherlands.
Dalhousie University, Canada.
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2022 (English)In: Communications Earth & Environment, E-ISSN 2662-4435, Vol. 3, no 1, article id 188Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Seafood holds promise for helping meet nutritional needs at a low climate impact. Here, we assess the nutrient density and greenhouse gas emissions, weighted by production method, that result from fishing and farming of globally important species. The highest nutrient benefit at the lowest emissions is achieved by consuming wild-caught small pelagic and salmonid species, and farmed bivalves like mussels and oysters. Many but not all seafood species provide more nutrition at lower emissions than land animal proteins, especially red meat, but large differences exist, even within species groups and species, depending on production method. Which nutrients contribute to nutrient density differs between seafoods, as do the nutrient needs of population groups within and between countries or regions. Based on the patterns found in nutritional attributes and climate impact, we recommend refocusing and tailoring production and consumption patterns towards species and production methods with improved nutrition and climate performance, taking into account specific nutritional needs and emission reduction goals. © 2022, The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group , 2022. Vol. 3, no 1, article id 188
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Energy Systems
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URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-60255DOI: 10.1038/s43247-022-00516-4Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85138069815OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-60255DiVA, id: diva2:1702276
Note

 Funding details: Svenska Forskningsrådet Formas, 2017-00842; Funding text 1: This research was funded by the Swedish Research Council Formas (Grant 2017-00842).

Available from: 2022-10-10 Created: 2022-10-10 Last updated: 2023-05-17Bibliographically approved

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Bianchi, Marta AngelaHallström, ElinorZiegler, Friederike

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