Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Preservation and Taphonomy of Fossil Insects from the Earliest Eocene of Denmark
Lund University, Sweden.
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2696-7215
Fur Museum, Denmark.
Fur Museum, Denmark.
Show others and affiliations
2022 (English)In: Biology, E-ISSN 2079-7737, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 395Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Marine sediments of the lowermost Eocene Stolleklint Clay and Fur Formation of north-western Denmark have yielded abundant well-preserved insects. However, despite a long history of research, in-depth information pertaining to preservational modes and taphonomic pathways of these exceptional animal fossils remains scarce. In this paper, we use a combination of scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to assess the ultrastructural and molecular composition of three insect fossils: a wasp (Hymenoptera), a damselfly (Odonata) and a pair of beetle elytra (Coleoptera). Our analyses show that all specimens are preserved as organic remnants that originate from the exoskeleton, with the elytra displaying a greater level of morphological fidelity than the other fossils. TEM analysis of the elytra revealed minute features, including a multilayered epicuticle comparable to those nanostructures that generate metallic colors in modern insects. Additionally, ToF-SIMS analyses provided spectral evidence for chemical residues of the pigment eumelanin as part of the cuticular remains. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first occasion where both structural colors and chemical traces of an endogenous pigment have been documented in a single fossil specimen. Overall, our results provide novel insights into the nature of insect body fossils and additionally shed light on exceptionally preserved terrestrial insect faunas found in marine paleoenvironments. © 2022 by the authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI , 2022. Vol. 11, no 3, article id 395
Keywords [en]
Cuticle, Eocene, Fur Formation, Insects, Melanin, Mo-clay, Pigment, Stolleklint Clay, Structural coloration, Ølst Formation
National Category
Geology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-58966DOI: 10.3390/biology11030395Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85126620965OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-58966DiVA, id: diva2:1648536
Note

Funding details: Vetenskapsrådet, VR, 2019-03731; Funding text 1: Funding: Financial support for this project was provided by a Distinguished Young Researcher Grant (Grant number 642-2014-3773; Swedish Research Council) to Johan Lindgren and a Project Grant (Grant number 2019-03731; Swedish Research Council) to Peter Sjövall.

Available from: 2022-03-31 Created: 2022-03-31 Last updated: 2023-06-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records

Sjövall, Peter

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Sjövall, Peter
By organisation
Product Realisation Methodology
In the same journal
Biology
Geology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 8 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf