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Tactile friction of topical creams and emulsions: Friction measurements on excised skin and VitroSkin® using ForceBoard™
Malmö University, Sweden; Speximo AB, Sweden.
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health.
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6657-1592
Malmö University, Sweden.
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2022 (English)In: International Journal of Pharmaceutics, ISSN 0378-5173, E-ISSN 1873-3476, Vol. 615, article id 121502Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tactile perception can be investigated through ex vivo friction measurements using a so–called ForceBoard™, providing objective assessments and savings in time and money, compared to a subjective human panel. In this work we aim to compare excised skin versus VitroSkin® as model substrates for tactile friction measurements. A further aim is to detect possible differences between traditional surfactant-based creams, and a particle-stabilized (Pickering) cream and investigate how the different substrates affect the results obtained. It was found that the difference in tactile friction between excised skin and VitroSkin® was small on untreated substrates. When topical creams were applied, the same trends were observed for both substrates, although the frictional variation over time relates to the difference in surface structure between the two substrates. The results also confirmed that there is a difference between starch-based Pickering formulations and surfactant-based creams after application, indicating that the latter is greasier than Pickering cream. It was also shown that the tactile friction of Pickering emulsions was consistently high even with high amounts of oil, indicating a non-greasy, and non-sticky formulation. The characteristics of starch-stabilized Pickering formulations make them promising candidates in the development of surfactant-free topical formulations with unique tactile properties. © 2022 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V. , 2022. Vol. 615, article id 121502
Keywords [en]
Excised skin, Force-Board™, Pickering emulsions, Surfactant-free formulations, Tactile friction, Topical creams, VitroSkin®
National Category
Food Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-58500DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2022.121502Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85123703718OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-58500DiVA, id: diva2:1638967
Note

 Funding details: Stiftelsen för Kunskaps- och Kompetensutveckling, KKS; Funding details: Gustav Th. Ohlssons Fond; Funding text 1: We are grateful to the Knowledge foundation (Sweden) for funding the project, and Johan Engblom also thank the Gustaf Th Olsson foundation (Sweden) for financial support. Speximo AB is acknowledged for providing starch particles.

Available from: 2022-02-18 Created: 2022-02-18 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved

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