Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Intuitive and subtle motion-anticipatory auditory cues reduce motion sickness in self-driving cars
Volvo Car Group, Sweden.
Volvo Car Group, Sweden.
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6134-4745
2021 (English)In: International Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics, ISSN 2045-7804, E-ISSN 2045-7812, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 370-392Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Motion sickness may be a factor detrimental to the experience of self-driving cars. This study investigates whether auditory displays can support in lowering passengers' feeling of motion sickness by allowing them to anticipate upcoming manoeuvres. Twenty participants took part in the study and rode on a specially designed test track with and without auditory display while performing a reading task. The display provided information about upcoming car manoeuvres, which were identified as being motion sickness inducing and the sounds were designed to resemble the actual sound of the manoeuvres taking place. Sounds representing acceleration, deceleration and left and right turns were played slightly in advance of the upcoming manoeuvre. Participants rated their motion sickness at regular intervals during the ride as well as before and after the ride. The results showed that illness ratings in the auditory display condition were statistically lower significantly compared to the condition without sound. The sounds were also judged as intuitive and helpful by the users who reported willingness to use them when riding autonomous cars in the future, especially while reading or working. These results have implications for the interaction design of self-driving cars and can guide future auditory display research. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Inderscience Publishers , 2021. Vol. 8, no 4, p. 370-392
Keywords [en]
Auditory display, Auditory display guidelines, Automation technology, Autonomous car, Autonomous drive, Car intention, Car perception, Experiment, Interaction design, Motion sickness, Self-driving vehicles, Sonification, User acceptance
National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-57356DOI: 10.1504/IJHFE.2021.119053Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85120305292OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-57356DiVA, id: diva2:1622642
Note

Export Date: 16 December 2021; Article; Correspondence Address: Maculewicz, J.; Volvo Car Group, Gunnar Engellaus väg 19, Sweden; email: justyna.maculewicz@volvocars.com; Funding details: Fellowships Fund Incorporated, FFI, 2018-02730; Funding text 1: The work presented in this paper is part of the currently ongoing project Sonic Interaction in Intelligent Cars (SIIC), funded by the Swedish Partnership Programme Strategic Vehicle Research and Innovation (FFI), D. Nr. 2018-02730. The project is a collaboration between Volvo Cars, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden and Pole Position Production.

Available from: 2021-12-23 Created: 2021-12-23 Last updated: 2023-05-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records

Fagerlönn, Johan

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Fagerlönn, Johan
By organisation
Prototyping Society
In the same journal
International Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 86 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf