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Objective measures of grape quality: From Cabernet Sauvignon grape composition to wine sensory characteristics
University of Adelaide, Australia; CSIRO, Australia.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2642-283x
Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway.
Nofima, Norway.
University of Adelaide, Australia.
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2020 (English)In: Lebensmittel-Wissenschaft + Technologie, ISSN 0023-6438, E-ISSN 1096-1127, Vol. 123, article id 109105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In an investigation of objective measures that link grape composition to wine quality, this study sought to identify Cabernet Sauvignon grape parameters that predict the sensory properties of the corresponding wines. Eleven chemical measures comprising volatile and non-volatile compounds, enzyme activity plus standard industry harvest measurements were applied to grape samples obtained from different regions throughout South Eastern Australia over three vintages. Grapes underwent controlled vinification and the resulting wines evaluated with sensory descriptive analysis. The entire multi-vintage data sets were combined and modelled using a combination of partial least squares (PLS) and sequential and orthogonalised (SO) -PLS regression techniques. Optimal models were obtained with single sensory attributes rather than global modelling with the entire sensory profile. Five grape chemical measures, which in the main were harvest parameters, were used along with colour, total phenolics and tannin, targeted volatiles, and flavonols, and orthogonalised to model 14 sensory attributes of the Cabernet Sauvignon wines. The seven remaining measures were not used due to their poor ability to model wine sensory attributes, with enzyme activity and tannin by HPLC explaining the least. The study revealed new insights into the relationship between grape chemistry and wine sensory characters, which has implications for developing an objective measurement system for determining grape quality. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press , 2020. Vol. 123, article id 109105
Keywords [en]
Cabernet Sauvignon, Chemometrics, Grapes, SO-PLS, Vitis vinifera, Wine, Enzyme activity, Flavonoids, Least squares approximations, Sensory analysis, Tannins, Volatile organic compounds, Cabernet-Sauvignon
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-56358DOI: 10.1016/j.lwt.2020.109105Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85078958523OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-56358DiVA, id: diva2:1592255
Note

 Funding details: Australian Government; Funding details: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, CSIRO; Funding text 1: The authors would like to thank the industry partners CCW Co-operative Ltd, Yalumba and Treasury Wine Estates, for generously allowing access to their vineyards and grapes samples. Authors acknowledge the financial support provided by Wine Australia (CSP1201) which is supported by Australian grape growers and winemakers with matching funds from the Australian Government. Sandra Olarte-Mantilla and Trent Johnson are greatly appreciated for their assistance in sensory data collection for the 2013 vintage, as is Claudia Niimi for her assistance with grape data collection. Michael Coode and John Gledhill from the WIC Winemaking service are thanked for producing the small-scale wines. CSIRO and The University of Adelaide are partners in the Wine Innovation Cluster at the Waite Campus. Nofima is acknowledged for supporting the work of T.N.; Funding text 2: The authors would like to thank the industry partners CCW Co-operative Ltd, Yalumba and Treasury Wine Estates, for generously allowing access to their vineyards and grapes samples. Authors acknowledge the financial support provided by Wine Australia ( CSP1201 ) which is supported by Australian grape growers and winemakers with matching funds from the Australian Government. Sandra Olarte-Mantilla and Trent Johnson are greatly appreciated for their assistance in sensory data collection for the 2013 vintage. Michael Coode and John Gledhill from the WIC Winemaking service are thanked for producing the small-scale wines. CSIRO and The University of Adelaide are partners in the Wine Innovation Cluster at the Waite Campus. Nofima is acknowledged for supporting the work of T.N.

Available from: 2021-09-08 Created: 2021-09-08 Last updated: 2023-05-23Bibliographically approved

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