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Energy inequality as a risk in socio-technical energy transitions: The Swedish case of individual metering and billing of energy for heating
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation. Lund University, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7568-3334
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5044-6989
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden. Lund University, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3863-0740
2020 (English)In: IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science, Vol. 588, no 3, article id 032015Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Improved energy efficiency in the housing stock is an important undertaking in the energy transition but is associated with both opportunities and risks. While there are possibilities to reduce energy inequalities in the housing stock, inequalities also risk being aggravated as actions for energy efficiency usually aim at the least energy efficient - and thus sometimes the least privileged - parts of the housing stock. In this paper, we use two different energy performance metrics (kWh/m2 and kWh/capita) to investigate the energy inequality in the Swedish multifamily building stock and explore the effects of these inequalities in the energy transition. More specifically, we investigate the implementation of individual metering and billing of energy for heating, which was recently implemented in the least energy efficient part of the housing stock. It was found that low-income households were overrepresented in the affected buildings. The consequence of this implementation is thus that the strongest protection against energy poverty in Sweden (collective billing for heating) is removed in a part of the housing stock where two of the predictors for energy poverty - low income and low energy performance - are overrepresented. It was concluded that acknowledging inequalities is crucial to avoid risks associated with the energy transition. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOP Publishing Ltd , 2020. Vol. 588, no 3, article id 032015
Keywords [en]
Economic and social effects, Heating, Housing, Sustainable development, Avoid risks, Building stocks, Energy performance, Energy poverties, Energy transitions, Housing stock, Least energy, Sociotechnical, Energy efficiency
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-51198DOI: 10.1088/1755-1315/588/3/032015Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85097159586OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-51198DiVA, id: diva2:1516231
Conference
World Sustainable Built Environment - Beyond 2020, WSBE 2020; Gothenburg; Sweden; 2 November 2020 through 4 November 202P Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science Volume 588, Issue 3, 20 November 2020, Article number0
Available from: 2021-01-11 Created: 2021-01-11 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved

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von Platten, JennyMangold, MikaelMjörnell, Kristina

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