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Free space optical link for biomedical applications
Lund University, Sweden.
Lund University, Sweden.
RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
Show others and affiliations
2012 (English)In: Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS, 2012, p. 1667-1670, article id 6346267Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Free space optics is an interesting alternative for telemetry with medical implants, due to the high data bandwidths available at optical frequencies. Especially implanted brain-computer interfaces gives rise to large data sets that needs to be transmitted transcutaneous. In this paper we show that it is possible to establish such a link at near-IR wavelengths using a modulated reflector in the implant, thus keeping the laser and the detector on the outside. In addition, we show that it will not only work on short, i.e. touch, distances but also at larger distances, in the range of a meter. We have used an electro absorption modulator to modulate the reflection of an external laser source back towards an external detector. The only part of this system that needs to be implanted is the modulator and drive electronics. The study has been done both by Monte-Carlo simulations of a multi-layer model of a rat skull, and with an experiment demonstrating the feasibility of the link when transmitted through biological tissue. The results show that it is possible to establish a transcutaneous link with an external laser source and light detector, and an internal modulated reflector.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. p. 1667-1670, article id 6346267
Keywords [en]
Biological tissues, Biomedical applications, Data bandwidth, Drive electronics, External laser sources, Free space optics, Free-space optical link, Large datasets, Medical implants, Monte Carlo Simulation, Multilayer models, Near-IR, Optical frequency, Transcutaneous, Transcutaneous link, Digital storage, Intelligent systems, Medical applications, Pulse circuits, Reflection, Lasers, animal, article, computer simulation, functions of the skin and its appendages, in vitro study, medical technology, methodology, Monte Carlo method, mouse, optics, rat, signal noise ratio, theoretical model, Animals, Biomedical Technology, Mice, Models, Theoretical, Optics and Photonics, Rats, Signal-To-Noise Ratio, Skin Physiological Phenomena
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-51025DOI: 10.1109/EMBC.2012.6346267Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84880846567ISBN: 9781424441198 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-51025DiVA, id: diva2:1516067
Conference
34th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 2012, 28 August 2012 through 1 September 2012, San Diego, CA
Available from: 2021-01-11 Created: 2021-01-11 Last updated: 2021-01-12Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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