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Konsumtionsbaserade resursavtryck och cirkulär ekonomi i Sverige: Nationella och lokala resursavtryck i Göteborg, Malmö och Umeå
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Infrastructure and concrete technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2066-6371
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.ORCID iD: 0009-0001-2826-226X
2020 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

World Business Council for Sustainable Development WBCSD estimates that by 2050we will need four to tenfold improvements in resource efficiency. Sweden's Agenda 2030Action Plan for 2018 - 2020 has a strategy for sustainable consumption that aims, amongother things, to increase resource efficiency and circular economy. The Swedishinnovation Agency Vinnova runs a program on circular economy from theory to practice.

This study is part of a project called “8 on society” and financed by the Swedishinnovation agency Vinnova. The aim of the project is to measure the citizens nationalfootprint and to increase the knowledge of municipalities on circular economy, the useof resources and citizens material footprints.

In this study we have chosen a method that measures the citizens consumption and itstotal impact on global resources. The method is called Lifestyle Material Footprint LMFand include, among other things, abiotic and biotic resources. A sustainable level withinplanetary boundaries lies at 8 tons per person, according to calculations from theWuppertal Institute and Aalto University.

The results of this study are based on national and municipal statistics on consumptioncombined with a resource database. The results show that Sweden's consumption-basedmaterial footprint is 32 tons per person and year: including food (20%), mobility (41%),housing (27%), and electronics / clothing / furniture (4%), leisure activities (6%). Theresults for Gothenburg and Malmö are also around 30-35 tons. Umeå stands out and isaround 40 tons. This is because heating for housing and transport are much higher innorthern Sweden. Finland shows similar figures, eg 40 tons.

Sweden's resource footprint for leisure activities is around 2,000 kg per person and year(distributed on 200 kg outdoor activities, 800 kg computer / TV, culture 100 kg, tourism900 kg). Differences between the three cities lie in tourism. Umeå residents travel more.Sweden's resource footprint for electronics, clothing and furniture is 1400 kg per personand year (800 kg electronics, 499 kg clothes and shoes, and 88 kg furniture).

The results also show that Swedish waste's related resource footprint is 5.5 tons including2.7 tons for electronics and 1 ton for mixed waste. Gothenburg and Malmö are around 3-4 tons including 1 ton for electronics and 1 ton for mixed waste.

Future scenarios and different lifestyles have been discussed (local, digital, circular) andcalculations of scenarios around division and circularity show that Sweden's resourcefootprint fall below 8 tons, but only if sharing initiatives increase from 10% to 20%, andcircularity increases to 40%.

The results also indicate that there is an opportunity to integrate resource footprint intostrategy and action plans in the three cities. Future prospects for using resource footprintas indicator look good. Within the new OECD study and the follow-up of circulareconomics, several new indicators have been proposed, including a resource footprint.To achieve a sustainable society and a circular economy, it also needs a resource targetkg / person for example in IT and electronics!

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020. , p. 60
Series
RISE Rapport ; 2020:42
Keywords [en]
footprint, resources, consumption, sharing, circular economy
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-50590ISBN: 9789189167247 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-50590DiVA, id: diva2:1499524
Available from: 2020-11-09 Created: 2020-11-09 Last updated: 2024-01-05

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Brunklaus, BirgitSchnurr, Maria

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