Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Combining expansion in pulp capacity with production of sustainable biofuels – Techno-economic and greenhouse gas emissions assessment of drop-in fuels from black liquor part-streams
Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy. International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis. Austria.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4909-6643
Preem AB, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2020 (English)In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 279, article id 115879Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Drop-in biofuels from forest by-products such as black liquor can help deliver deep reductions in transport greenhouse gas emissions by replacing fossil fuels in our vehicle fleet. Black liquor is produced at pulp mills that can increase their pulping capacity by upgrading some of it to drop-in biofuels but this is not well-studied. We evaluate the techno-economic and greenhouse gas performance of five drop-in biofuel pathways based on BL lignin separation with hydrotreatment or black liquor gasification with catalytic synthesis. We also assess how integrated biofuel production impacts different types of pulp mills and a petroleum refinery by using energy and material balances assembled from experimental data supplemented by expert input. Our results indicate that drop-in biofuels from black liquor part-streams can be produced for ~80 EUR2017/MWh, which puts black liquor on the same footing (or better) as comparable forest residue-based alternatives. The best pathways in both production routes have comparable costs and their principal biofuel products (petrol for black liquor gasification and diesel for lignin hydrotreatment) complement each other. All pathways surpass European Union's sustainability criteria for greenhouse gas savings from new plants. Supplementing black liquor with pyrolysis oil or electrolysis hydrogen can improve biofuel production potentials and feedstock diversity, but better economic performance does not accompany these benefits. Fossil hydrogen represents the cheaper option for lignin hydrotreatment by some margin, but greenhouse gas savings from renewable hydrogen are nearly twice as great. Research on lignin upgrading in industrial conditions is recommended for reducing the presently significant performance uncertainties. © 2020 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd , 2020. Vol. 279, article id 115879
Keywords [en]
Biofuels, Black liquor, Gasification, Hydrotreatment, Lignin, Pulp, Drops, Fleet operations, Forestry, Fossil fuels, Gas emissions, Gasoline, Greenhouse gases, Industrial research, Petroleum refineries, Biofuel production, Black liquor gasification, Catalytic synthesis, Economic performance, Industrial conditions, Material balance, Renewable hydrogens, Sustainability criteria, biofuel, economic analysis, electrokinesis, energy conservation, greenhouse gas, hydrogen, pyrolysis, sustainability
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-49466DOI: 10.1016/j.apenergy.2020.115879Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85091666946OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-49466DiVA, id: diva2:1478207
Note

Funding details: Energimyndigheten; Funding text 1: This work was supported by the Swedish Energy Agency , f3 – Swedish Knowledge Centre for Renewable Transportation Fuels, and Bio4Energy .

Available from: 2020-10-21 Created: 2020-10-21 Last updated: 2023-05-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records

Mesfun, SennaiMossberg, JohannaFurusjö, Erik

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Mesfun, SennaiMossberg, JohannaFurusjö, Erik
By organisation
Biorefinery and Energy
In the same journal
Applied Energy
Natural Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 92 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf