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Process integration of green hydrogen: Decarbonization of chemical industries
NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4273-231x
University of South-Eastern Norway, Norway.
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2020 (English)In: Energies, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 13, no 18, article id 4859Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Integrated water electrolysis is a core principle of new process configurations for decarbonized heavy industries. Water electrolysis generates H2 and O2 and involves an exchange of thermal energy. In this manuscript, we investigate specific traditional heavy industrial processes that have previously been performed in nitrogen-rich air environments. We show that the individual process streams may be holistically integrated to establish new decarbonized industrial processes. In new process configurations, CO2 capture is facilitated by avoiding inert gases in reactant streams. The primary energy required to drive electrolysis may be obtained from emerging renewable power sources (wind, solar, etc.) which have enjoyed substantial industrial development and cost reductions over the last decade. The new industrial designs uniquely harmonize the intermittency of renewable energy, allowing chemical energy storage. We show that fully integrated electrolysis promotes the viability of decarbonized industrial processes. Specifically, new process designs uniquely exploit intermittent renewable energy for CO2 conversion, enabling thermal integration, H2 and O2 utilization, and sub-process harmonization for economic feasibility. The new designs are increasingly viable for decarbonizing ferric iron reduction, municipal waste incineration, biomass gasification, fermentation, pulp production, biogas upgrading, and calcination, and are an essential step forward in reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions. © 2020 by the authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG , 2020. Vol. 13, no 18, article id 4859
Keywords [en]
Biogas upgrading, Calcination, Electrolysis, Fermentation, Green hydrogen, Iron reduction, Municipal waste incineration, Oxy-combustion, Process integration, Pulp production, Carbon dioxide, Chemical industry, Cost reduction, Energy storage, Hydrogen production, Inert gases, Waste incineration, Biomass Gasification, Economic feasibilities, Industrial development, Industrial processs, Process configuration, Thermal integration, Process design, Cost Control, Energy, Integration, Processes, Water
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-49486DOI: 10.3390/en13184859Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85091842567OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-49486DiVA, id: diva2:1477138
Available from: 2020-10-16 Created: 2020-10-16 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved

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Rodriguez-Fabia, Sandra

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