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Additive manufacturing of prostheses using forest-based composites
Stora Enso AB, Sweden.
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2622-9757
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
Embreis AB, Sweden.
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2020 (English)In: Bioengineering, E-ISSN 2306-5354, Vol. 7, no 3, article id 103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A custom-made prosthetic product is unique for each patient. Fossil-based thermoplastics are the dominant raw materials in both prosthetic and industrial applications; there is a general demand for reducing their use and replacing them with renewable, biobased materials. A transtibial prosthesis sets strict demands on mechanical strength, durability, reliability, etc., which depend on the biocomposite used and also the additive manufacturing (AM) process. The aim of this project was to develop systematic solutions for prosthetic products and services by combining biocomposites using forestry-based derivatives with AM techniques. Composite materials made of polypropylene (PP) reinforced with microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) were developed. The MFC contents (20, 30 and 40 wt%) were uniformly dispersed in the polymer PP matrix, and the MFC addition significantly enhanced the mechanical performance of the materials. With 30 wt% MFC, the tensile strength and Young´s modulus was about twice that of the PP when injection molding was performed. The composite material was successfully applied with an AM process, i.e., fused deposition modeling (FDM), and a transtibial prosthesis was created based on the end-user’s data. A clinical trial of the prosthesis was conducted with successful outcomes in terms of wearing experience, appearance (color), and acceptance towards the materials and the technique. Given the layer-by-layer nature of AM processes, structural and process optimizations are needed to maximize the reinforcement effects of MFC to eliminate variations in the binding area between adjacent layers and to improve the adhesion between layers. © 2020 by the authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG , 2020. Vol. 7, no 3, article id 103
Keywords [en]
Additive manufacturing, Artificial limb, Biocomposite, Fibrils, Forest-based MFC, Fused deposition modeling (FDM)
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-48771DOI: 10.3390/bioengineering7030103Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85090328024OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-48771DiVA, id: diva2:1466960
Note

Export Date: 14 September 2020; Article; Funding text 1: Funding: This work was financially supported by national research agencies, Vinnova, Formas, and Energimyndigheten, through BioInnovation, a Strategic Innovation Program, through AMPOFORM and BioComp-PPS projects.

Available from: 2020-09-14 Created: 2020-09-14 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved

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Flodberg, GöranYang, Li

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