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Impact evaluation of a thin hybrid wood based joist floor
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Samhällsbyggnad, Byggteknik.ORCID-id: 0000-0002-0019-4568
Linnæus University, Sweden. (Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för teknik (FTK), Institutionen för maskinteknik (MT). (Maskinteknik))ORCID-id: 0000-0002-4404-5708
2016 (engelsk)Inngår i: Proceedings of ISMA 2016: International Conference on Noise and Vibration Engineering, 2016, s. 589-602Konferansepaper, Publicerat paper (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this paper is twofold. The first aim is to develop a numericalanalysis procedure, by combining FRFs from FE-models with analyticalformulas for sound emission and transmission from the ceiling anddownwards within a room with four walls. The aim is to, by applying thisapproach; accomplish a tool which calculates the relative impact soundbetween different joist floors, in the low frequency range. The second aim is tobenchmark a thin hybrid wooden based joist floor with similar thickness,surface weight and global bending stiffness as a concrete hollow core floorstructure. What will be the difference in sound transmission? The question isrelevant since it may be necessary to make thinner wood based joist floors inhigh rise buildings, if wood should stay competitive against concrete. Theresults show that the direct transmissions of impact sound are very similararound the first bending mode. As the frequency increases, the modes in thestructures differ significantly. Below 100 Hz, the concrete floor has 4 modes,while the hybrid joist floor has 9 modes. As the frequency increases the soundradiation characteristics differs. The results show that it is possible to havesimilar sound transmission properties around the first bending modes for ahybrid based joist floor and a hollow core concrete floor structure with similar thicknesses. At the first modes of the structure, the information about thesurface weight and global bending stiffness are useful for prediction of soundtransmission properties but for higher modes, they are not sufficient.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
2016. s. 589-602
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-36984ISBN: 978-1-5108-3591-7 (tryckt)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-36984DiVA, id: diva2:1275921
Konferanse
International Conference on Noise and Vibration Engineering 2016 (ISMA 2016), September 19-21, 2016, Leuven, Belgium
Forskningsfinansiär
Interreg Öresund-Kattegat-Skagerrak
Merknad

The FE-Model development of the joist floor made within the ProWOOD research education program,funded by the Swedish Knowledge foundation, Linnæus University and SP Technical Research Institute ofSweden. The further sound radiation analysis of the joist floors was made within the Intereg Öresund-Kattegat-Skagerak project Urban Tranquililty.

Tilgjengelig fra: 2019-01-07 Laget: 2019-01-07 Sist oppdatert: 2019-06-24bibliografisk kontrollert
Inngår i avhandling
1. Low Frequency Impact Sound in Timber Buildings: Simulations and Measurements
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Low Frequency Impact Sound in Timber Buildings: Simulations and Measurements
2016 (engelsk)Licentiatavhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
Abstract [en]

An increased share of construction with timber is one possible way of achieving more sustainable and energy-efficient life cycles of buildings. The main reason is that wood is a renewable material and buildings require a large amount of resources. Timber buildings taller than two storeys were prohibited in Europe until the 1990s due to fire regulations. In 1994, this prohibition was removed in Sweden.

    Some of the early multi-storey timber buildings were associated with more complaints due to impact sound than concrete buildings with the same measured impact sound class rating. Research in later years has shown that the frequency range used for rating has not been sufficiently low in order to include all the sound characteristics that are important for subjective perception of impact sound in light weight timber buildings. The AkuLite project showed that the frequency range has to be extended down to 20 Hz in order to give a good quality of the rating. This low frequency range of interest requires a need for knowledge of the sound field distribution, how to best measure the sound, how to predict the sound transmission levels and how to correlate numerical predictions with measurements.

    Here, the goal is to improve the knowledge and methodology concerning measurements and predictions of low frequency impact sound in light weight timber buildings. Impact sound fields are determined by grid measurements in rooms within timber buildings with different designs of their joist floors. The measurements are used to increase the understanding of impact sound and to benchmark different field measurement methods. By estimating transfer functions, from impact forces to vibrations and then sound pressures in receiving rooms, from vibrational test data, improved possibilities to correlate the experimental results to numerical simulations are achieved. A number of excitation devices are compared experimentally to evaluate different characteristics of the test data achieved. Further, comparisons between a timber based hybrid joist floor and a modern concrete floor are made using FE-models to evaluate how stiffness and surface mass parameters affect the impact sound transfer and the radiation.

    The measurements of sound fields show that light weight timber floors in small rooms tend to have their highest sound levels in the low frequency region, where the modes are well separated, and that the highest levels even can occur below the frequency of the first room mode of the air. In rooms with excitation from the floor above, the highest levels tend to occur at the floor levels and in the floor corners, if the excitation is made in the middle of the room above. Due to nonlinearities, the excitation levels may affect the transfer function in low frequencies which was shown in an experimental study. Surface mass and bending stiffness of floor systems are shown, by simulations, to be important for the amount of sound radiated.

    By applying a transfer function methodology, measuring the excitation forces as well as the responses, improvements of correlation analyses between measurements and simulations can be achieved.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Växjö: Linnaeus University Dissertations, 2016. s. 100
Emneord
Impact sound, Stegljud
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-36986 (URN)978-91-88357-46-5 (ISBN)
Presentation
2016-11-30, Sal Tegnér,, Hus H, Linnéuniversitet, Växjö, 10:00 (engelsk)
Opponent
Veileder
Prosjekter
ProWoodSilent Timber BuildUrban TranquilityBioInnovation FBBB
Tilgjengelig fra: 2019-07-02 Laget: 2019-01-07 Sist oppdatert: 2019-07-02bibliografisk kontrollert

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