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Publications (10 of 11) Show all publications
Hynynen, J., Quant, M., Pramanik, R., Olofsson, A., Li, Y. Z., Arvidson, M. & Andersson, P. (2023). Electric Vehicle Fire Safety in Enclosed Spaces.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Electric Vehicle Fire Safety in Enclosed Spaces
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2023 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Lately, concerns regarding fires in electric vehicles in enclosed spaces such as in road tunnels and parking garages have been raised and there are indications that parking of electric vehicles may be prohibited in some spaces. For the success of electromobility and the transition from fossil to renewable fuels, it is important to understand the risks and consequences of fires in electric vehicles and to provide technical solutions if necessary, so as not to hinder the widespread adoption of electric vehicles.

In this work, a literature review on fires in vehicles has been conducted. The focus was on fires in enclosed spaces involving electric vehicles. A comprehensive risk assessment of electric vehicle fires was performed using systematic hazard identification. In addition, a workshop with representatives from three Swedish fire and rescue services was carried out to evaluate the emergency rescue sheets/response guides.

The main conclusions are; That statistics regarding vehicle fires need to be improved, as of today the root causes of fires are missing in the data, which could potentially result in non-fact based regulations; The data studied in this work does not imply that fires in electric vehicles are more common than fires in internal combustion engine vehicles; Fires in electric vehicles and internal combustion engine vehicles are similar in regards to the fire intensity and peak heat release rates. 

The most effective risk reductions measures on vehicle level, to decrease the number of fires in EVs, could not be defined based on that relevant data on the root causes of fires in EVs are currently not publicly accessible. The most effective risk reduction measures, to limit fire spread, on infrastructure level were the use of fire sprinkler systems, fire detection systems (early detection) and increased distance between parked vehicles.

Publisher
p. 79
Series
RISE Rapport ; 2023:42
Keywords
Electric vehicle, fire safety, enclosed space, parking garage, vehicle fire, field experience, hazard identification
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics Other Chemical Engineering Other Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-64248 (URN)978-91-89757-90-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-03-21 Created: 2023-03-21 Last updated: 2023-11-02Bibliographically approved
Pramanik, R., Andersson, S. & Andersson, P. (2023). Harbour Battery Energy Storage Systems: Hazards and potential mitigation measures. Brandposten (62), 28-29
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Harbour Battery Energy Storage Systems: Hazards and potential mitigation measures
2023 (English)In: Brandposten, no 62, p. 28-29Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Battery Energy Storage Systems (BESS) is a vital part of electrification of the shipping industry. However, there are potential risks that must be considered for BESS installation. The article presents HAZID as an earlystage hazard identification method for installation of harbour BESS. The HAZID identified critical factors such as proximity to the marine environment and safe distances between BESS containers

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, 2023
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-73088 (URN)
Available from: 2024-04-30 Created: 2024-04-30 Last updated: 2024-04-30Bibliographically approved
Pramanik, R. (2021). Diversity and Inclusion in Businessas a Tool to Enhance Business Continuity. Paper presented at Know Disasters Conference Webinar. Know Disasters Magazine, May-June, 26-29
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diversity and Inclusion in Businessas a Tool to Enhance Business Continuity
2021 (English)In: Know Disasters Magazine, Vol. May-June, p. 26-29-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [en]

If we appreciate thesociological complexities andinterconnectedness of our21st-century society, we willrealise that the immediatechallenges of businesscontinuity can be resolvedby practising diversity andinclusion. The solutions lie among us; what we need is the intent.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New Delhi, India: , 2021
Keywords
Business continuity; disaster risk reduction; disaster management; diversity; inclusion; policy making; public private partnerships
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-58713 (URN)
Conference
Know Disasters Conference Webinar
Available from: 2022-02-24 Created: 2022-02-24 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Pramanik, R. (2021). Resource mobilization and contributing resources to a collective task by emergency responders: an experimental study on collaboration in crisis response: Mobilizingresources incrisis response. Continuity & Resilience Review, 3(2), 149-165
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resource mobilization and contributing resources to a collective task by emergency responders: an experimental study on collaboration in crisis response: Mobilizingresources incrisis response
2021 (English)In: Continuity & Resilience Review, ISSN 2516-7502, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 149-165Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract

Purpose – Twenty-first century crises reaffirm the need of faster mobilization of resources during crises.Without interorganizational collaboration and resource mobilization, organizing efficient response is notpossible. Resource mobilization is an essential aspect of response. It ensures a faster and better response.Collaboration between teams of emergency responders may include commonly known boundary spanningactivities such as resource sharing, information sharing and communication. The purpose of this paper is tocontribute our knowledge of how to organize a better crisis response through collaboration. More precisely,what strategies work as drivers for emergency responder teams during collaboration in crisis scenarios.

Design/methodology/approach – Through design of experiments, using tabletop exercises and onlinesurveys, this study investigates the drivers of collaboration during a crisis scenario. Participants of this studyare decision makers and emergency responders from various public actors in crisis management from Sweden.

Findings – Collaboration is essential to manage cross-functional services in normal times, as well as meet thegrowing needs during crises. In absence of collaboration, boundary spanning activities such as sharingresources or information to provide any kind of service will not be possible. For teams to survive in fastchangingenvironment, they must be able to adapt to the changing demands accordingly. This paperdemonstrates which factors are drivers for emergency responders to mobilize resources, especially duringcrises. It captures the tension between individual and collective goals in crisis response and highlights thedrivers that affect decision-making during crises.

Originality/value – The novelty of the paper lies in its methodology using tabletop exercises, design ofexperiments as part of Six Sigma toolbox and online surveys in combination with weightage of agreements anddisagreements and free text answers. Although scientific research so far has demonstrated the need forcollaboration during crises, however, which factors act as drivers for emergency responders to collaborate, islacking scientific evidence. Incentives for collaboration have not been studied enough. These can tell us whichstrategies can improve collaboration during crises. This research paper is a scientific contribution in thatdirection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2021
Keywords
Collaboration, Crisis response, Individual goal, Collective goal, Goal conflict, Trade-off, Collective task, Resource contribution, Resource mobilization
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-58711 (URN)10.1108/crr-03-2021-0010 (DOI)
Available from: 2022-02-24 Created: 2022-02-24 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Bram, S., Sjögren, P., Burgén, J. & Pramanik, R. (2021). STM BALTSAFE : Validation of WP4: Document No: BS_ WP6.2.2.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>STM BALTSAFE : Validation of WP4: Document No: BS_ WP6.2.2
2021 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Vessel Traffic Service Operators (VTSOs) employ their experience and problem-solving skills in order to uphold safety in the controlled traffic area. Human Factors studies focus on the conditions of that work – whether technologies, organizations and interfaces to other stakeholders are adapted to VTS operator activities and needs. For the VTS, the purpose of Sea Traffic Management (STM) services is to allow digital communication and information sharing between the VTS Centre and ships in the controlled area, with an emphasis on simple creation and sharing of ship routes. The aim of this evaluation has been to uncover Human Factors hazards associated with the introduction of STM services developed in STM BALT SAFE WP4, directed towards route creation, sharing and associated safety functions. Analyses have concentrated on three levels of interaction within the sea traffic system: 1. The VTS operator and her immediate working environment (usability and ergonomics of VTS systems and tools affected by STM implementation). 2. The organization of VTS collaboration with other actors in the port and its surroundings. 3. Interaction in the greater context of ship traffic (including both STM and non-STM ships). The evaluation was performed using qualitative methods in a process consisting of three main stages – A first analysis using heuristics from the domain of Human Reliability Analysis, an interview study with sea traffic system stakeholders, and a VTS simulator study. Results indicate that maritime administrations should employ a consistent design process that caters for local VTS Centre characteristics and the needs of their operators. As work with STM continues, technical development should be augmented with an iterative development of VTS system user experience and usability. Aspects of STM that are already known to require a human factors validation are, but not limited to: • That the new information provided to operators through the STM services is presented in a way that does not introduce confusion or obscure information (e.g. cluttering of routes, poor visibility of ships/routes/geographical features). • That alarms and/or alerts are relevant, useful and communicated effectively. Irrelevant alarms or alerts can disturb the work of the VTSO, and even if only relevant alerts are provided, the sum of all alerts can still produce a poor working environment (e.g. with regard to noise). • That STM services are coupled with sufficient support for notetaking and/or marking. With a larger bulk of information available to the operator (e.g. around possible future hazards) comes a larger need to support the operator attention and memory. • That the implementation of STM functions accounts for information management over several work shifts. • That predictive tools (e.g. prediction of future ship movements and associated conflicts) factor in prediction uncertainty, so that the operator is given a truthful representation of possible traffic development. • That there are means of communication suitable for use with the STM functions. Even though chat functionality was excluded from the STM BALT SAFE scope, some informants hold that other means of communication than VHF might be necessary if the ship is to send its route before reaching the VTS area. • That dynamics in VTS-ship interaction may be affected as new forms of communication develop. For example, even if the purpose of the VTS Centre is only to “inform” ships about traffic conditions, creating and sharing routes via STM services might be regarded as something more than a friendly suggestion. This invokes a discussion around VTS authority and responsibility in the event of an incident that needs to be continued. Evaluation data suggests that the use of STM functionality is not appropriate for all operative conditions, and that implementation must be calibrated against the practical needs of local VTS operators. Here, a balance must be struck between allowing for local adaption of STM services and offering a uniform STM interface towards vessels moving between different control areas. A final aspect of adaptation is the relation between VTS technical functionality and how these functionalities are put to practical use. Seeing that STM services could expand the operator time horizon and allow them to work more proactively, technical development should be combined with a review of local VTS procedures, making sure that the VTS operational approach (e.g. procedures for ship interaction or the functional level of VTS implementation) matches all the capabilities afforded by STM.

Publisher
p. 46
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-73094 (URN)
Available from: 2024-05-02 Created: 2024-05-02 Last updated: 2024-05-02Bibliographically approved
Pramanik, R. (2018). Chapter 11: Armed forces in disaster response: Problems and perspectives on disaster governance in India. In: Governance of Risk, Hazards and Disasters: Trends in Theory and Practice: (pp. 190-205). London, UK: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chapter 11: Armed forces in disaster response: Problems and perspectives on disaster governance in India
2018 (English)In: Governance of Risk, Hazards and Disasters: Trends in Theory and Practice, London, UK: Routledge, 2018, p. 190-205Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This chapter looks at the challenges of disaster governance in India. It highlights the problems of engaging the Armed Forces as the responder to disasters given the prevalent sociological dynamics within the communities. The Armed Forces in India have successfully responded to several catastrophes such as the Gujarat earthquake, the Indian Ocean tsunami, the Kashmir earthquake and the mudslides in Himachal that severely hit India. The findings from the interviews analyse the reasons behind the growing involvement of the Armed Forces in disaster response and recovery in India. They also capture the challenges of involving the Armed Forces from a critical perspective. The sophisticated logistical processes, techniques and equipment owned by the Armed Forces have been utilised in immediate response and relief operations to large-scale disasters in several countries, including India, to support the otherwise overwhelmed State-owned response mechanisms. The level of women's involvement in the growing presence of the Armed Forces in disaster response and recovery is negligible.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: Routledge, 2018
Keywords
DM Disaster Management; DRR Disaster Risk Reduction; Armed Forces; DRM Disaster Risk Management; Stakeholders Involvement; RVA Risk Assessment Vulnerability Assessment; Governance; Challenges & Opportunities.
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-58431 (URN)10.4324/9781315463896 (DOI)2-s2.0-85045605458 (Scopus ID)9781315463889 (ISBN)9781138206823 (ISBN)
Note

Date of publishing: 2018, Jan 1.

Available from: 2022-01-25 Created: 2022-01-25 Last updated: 2022-03-14Bibliographically approved
Giritli Nygren, K., Olofsson, A., Pramanik, R. & Öhman, S. (2018). Mapping of Risk Perception and Assessment: Inspiring Methods for National Level Risk Mapping in Sweden. Mid Sweden University, Department of Social Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mapping of Risk Perception and Assessment: Inspiring Methods for National Level Risk Mapping in Sweden
2018 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Our modern society is exposed to multiple hazards and risks. To manage these successfully, it is important to have a good overview of the risks that potentially affect our society and how they are perceived and valued. This pilot study investigated possible ways of mapping and analysing risks that Swedish society and its inhabitants are exposed to and aware of. The aim was to capture complementary perspectives on accidents and crises, and to provide a point of departure for future planning and data collection strategies. To achieve this, previous studies are mapped and critically assessed and an example of a method of analysis is presented. The following questions have guided the work: 1) What methods are currently available to describe risks at a broader societal level? 2) What are the limitations, advantages and disadvantages of these existing methods? 3) Which of these methods are of relevance to Sweden? Summarizing previous studies, the report includes examples of methods, structures and data visualizations for mapping risks nationally or in larger regions. The report analyses 11 types of existing study or report as a source of inspiration and to scope existing gaps for potential improvement. The report makes recommendations for national level risk mapping in a Swedish context, supported by an empirical example.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mid Sweden University, Department of Social Sciences, 2018
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-73093 (URN)978-91-7383-786-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2024-05-02 Created: 2024-05-02 Last updated: 2024-05-07Bibliographically approved
Pramanik, R. (2015). Challenges in coordination: Differences in perception of civil and military organizations by comparing international scientific literature and field experiences. Journal of Risk Research, 18(7), 989-1007
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges in coordination: Differences in perception of civil and military organizations by comparing international scientific literature and field experiences
2015 (English)In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 989-1007Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The extreme pressure resulting from modern-day disasters in terms of severe shortages of resources, mass casualties, infrastructure breakdown, large-scale damage and their impact necessitate coordination between all the agencies involved in disaster response. Better coordination in international disaster response operations will make them more effective in organizing the different phases of relief, rehabilitation and recovery. Recent disasters such as the hurricane Katrina, the Indian Ocean tsunami and the earthquake in Haiti have seen multiple civil agencies and the military working together. However, challenges have been identified in civil-military coordination. Differences in working procedures and a lack of knowledge on the others organizational identities resulted in stereotyping and prejudices, which are root obstacles to coordination. The aim of this study was to identify the perception-related challenges in civil-military coordination, and how they are perceived in the field by civil and military teams, and to investigate whether perception-related challenges and their implications have been reported in the international literature. A systematic literature review and 12 semi-structured interviews were carried out to answer these questions. Nine out of the 12 respondents were practitioners from the Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency (MSB) and the Swedish military, with experience of international disaster response missions that involved civil-military interactions, and 3 were trainees from Karlberg Military Academy, Stockholm, who were expected to participate in similar operations in the near future. The questions asked during the interviews were based on the systematic literature review. National backgrounds, attitudes and perceptions of the professionals towards the other organization were found to be key factors influencing civil-military coordination. This indicates that comparisons between the perceptions of professionals from both civil and military teams with different nationalities and different political histories should be carried out in future research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2015
Keywords
civilmilitary coordination, international disaster response operations, perception of challenges, Emergency services, Attitudes and perceptions, Disaster response operations, Military organizations, Organizational identities, Scientific literature, Semi structured interviews, Systematic literature review, Human resource management
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-58433 (URN)10.1080/13669877.2015.1043566 (DOI)2-s2.0-84938419363 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-01-25 Created: 2022-01-25 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Pramanik, R. (2015). Interorganizational Collaboration In Crisis Response Management: Exploring The Conditions For Improving Collaborative Behaviour Across Organizational Borders.. (Licentiate dissertation). Division of Risk Management and Societal Safety, Faculty of Engineering, Lund University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interorganizational Collaboration In Crisis Response Management: Exploring The Conditions For Improving Collaborative Behaviour Across Organizational Borders.
2015 (English)Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis explores the conditions to improve collaborative behaviour between organizations in crisis response management. It takes an explorative approach and begins by identifying several challenges to interorganizational collaboration. A systematic review of the international scientific literature in conjuction with semi-structured interviews with crisis management professionals in civil-military collaboration context identified several challenges and their underlying reasons.Indications on ways to minimize such challenges are also explored. Based on these indications, two factors are chosen that are tested with the help of experiments involving 111 crisis management professionals from the Swedish police force, fire and rescue services, defense forces and the Civil Contingencies Agency (MSB). The experiments were performed to test whether changing the degree of these factors can potentially influence collaborative behaviour. Findings of the study indicate that by changing familiarity and expectation of future cooperation the extent of utilizing resources and the extent ofcontributing resources can be influenced. With greater degree of familiarity and long term commitment between organizations, greater knowledge on capabilities and equipment of other actors in crisis response, there is a higher extent of utilization of resources from other organizations in a joint task. Similarly higher degree of familiarity and long term commitment also make organizations to be more willing to contribute in terms of resources, equipment, knowledge and capabilities in a joint task. This means by fostering higher degree of familiarity and long term commitment, organizations areexpected to share, allocate and mobilze resources between them more effectively. Since this most likely will contribute to improve overall collaborative efforts in crisis response management, steps to increase familiarity and long term commitment between organizations seem to be a promising strategy to improve interorganizational collaboration. The thesis also discusseshow increased familiarity and long term commitments may also help organizations to adapt to changed conditions that arise during crises. The thesis has implications for crisis planning, preparedness and overall improvements of collaborative efforts in crisis response management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Division of Risk Management and Societal Safety, Faculty of Engineering, Lund University, 2015
Keywords
interorganizational collaboration, crisis response management, collaborative behaviour, organizational adaptation.
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-73126 (URN)978-91-7623-554-6 (ISBN)
Note

Licentiate Thesis

Available from: 2024-05-14 Created: 2024-05-13 Last updated: 2024-05-14Bibliographically approved
Pramanik, R., Hassel, H. & Tehler, H. (2015). Motivating factors towards willingness to contribute in collaborative tasks: A crisis cooperation perspective. In: Safety and Reliability of Complex Engineered Systems - Proceedings of the 25th European Safety and Reliability Conference, ESREL 2015: . Paper presented at 25th European Safety and Reliability Conference, ESREL 2015, 7 September 2015 through 10 September 2015 (pp. 237-243). CRC Press/Balkema
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Motivating factors towards willingness to contribute in collaborative tasks: A crisis cooperation perspective
2015 (English)In: Safety and Reliability of Complex Engineered Systems - Proceedings of the 25th European Safety and Reliability Conference, ESREL 2015, CRC Press/Balkema , 2015, p. 237-243Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The interaction among various stakeholder organizations in modern crisis response is very similar to negotiation where each organization has its own goal in addition to a common goal. Decision makers in stakeholder organizations most often have to settle for win-win situations to attain higher joint benefit. In such cases willingness to contribute in joint tasks becomes a prerequisite. In our present study performed with 111 crisis management professionals from various stakeholder organizations in decision making roles, we study familiarity and expectation to future cooperation as constructs that can motivate decision makers to be more willing to contribute to joint tasks in crisis response.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CRC Press/Balkema, 2015
Keywords
Reliability, Collaborative tasks, Crisis management, Crisis response, Decision makers, Win-win, Decision making
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-58434 (URN)10.1201/b19094-35 (DOI)2-s2.0-84958962592 (Scopus ID)9781138028791 (ISBN)
Conference
25th European Safety and Reliability Conference, ESREL 2015, 7 September 2015 through 10 September 2015
Available from: 2022-01-25 Created: 2022-01-25 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1965-4963

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