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Costa, E., Wrange, A.-L., Collier, E. S., Niimi, J. & Strand, Å. (2023). Beyond raw: Investigating alternative preparation methods as a tool to increase acceptance of oysters in Sweden. Future Foods, 7, Article ID 100217.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond raw: Investigating alternative preparation methods as a tool to increase acceptance of oysters in Sweden
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2023 (English)In: Future Foods, ISSN 2666-8335, Vol. 7, article id 100217Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The role of seafood in supporting transitions towards more sustainable and healthier diets is often overlooked. Oysters, for example, are a nutrient dense aquatic food whose production requires no feed, freshwater, or land use. However, oyster consumption in Sweden is limited, possibly in part due to being traditionally served raw. This study investigated consumer acceptance of oysters when cooked and prepared to resemble familiar foods and examined whether food neophobia (FN) was related to liking. Four oyster-based samples (raw oyster, oyster crepe, oyster burger, and oyster soup) were evaluated in an ecologically valid setting. Participants (N=102; convenience sampling) rated the samples in terms of hedonics (expected liking and liking after tasting), described which aspects of the samples were liked/disliked, and reported the contexts in which oyster consumption is perceived as appropriate. The findings suggest that FN was negatively associated with expected liking of raw oysters, but not with expected liking for cooked oyster-based products that were cooked to resemble familiar foods. On the other hand, familiarity with oysters was positively associated with expected liking of raw oysters. This suggests that expanding oyster preparations beyond its traditional raw format could be a valuable strategy to promote oyster consumption in Sweden. © 2023 The Author(s)

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2023
Keywords
Consumer acceptance, Food neophobia, Liking, Oyster consumption, Street food
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-64093 (URN)10.1016/j.fufo.2023.100217 (DOI)2-s2.0-85147933822 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Correspondence Address: Costa E, RISE, Sweden; email: elena.costa@ri.se; Funding details: Svenska Forskningsrådet Formas, 2020-02834; Funding text 1: This work was supported by funding from FORMAS – Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences, and Spatial Planning, grant number 2020-02834, and satellite project funding through the Blue Food Center.; Funding text 2: Main chef developing recipes: Stefan Sandersnäs (Grebbestad folkhögskola). Food preparation: chef Stefan Sandersnäs and students in sustainable seafood education (Grebbestad folkhögskola). Main chef in food truck: Loppa Alexius. Research assistants: Matej Bozon and Isabelle Johansson. Professional oyster shucker: Mattias Gustavsson (Frölunda lilla saluhall). Data collection and technical support (permits, seating area etc.): Kristoffer Nilsson and Peter Nylund (Stadsbyggnadskontoret). Food truck: Lindholmen Street Food Market. Oyster raw material: Adriaan van de Plasse (Orust Shellfish). Kathryn Harris, generation of the final version of Fig. 2.

Available from: 2023-02-28 Created: 2023-02-28 Last updated: 2023-10-30Bibliographically approved
Niimi, J., Sörensen, V., Mihnea, M., Valentin, D., Bergman, P. & Collier, E. (2023). Does cooking ability affect consumer perception and appreciation of plant-based protein in Bolognese sauces?. Food Quality and Preference, 99, Article ID 104563.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does cooking ability affect consumer perception and appreciation of plant-based protein in Bolognese sauces?
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2023 (English)In: Food Quality and Preference, ISSN 0950-3293, E-ISSN 1873-6343, Vol. 99, article id 104563Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Encouraging consumers to reduce their meat consumption is imperative in mitigating climate change effects related to the food industry. For some, transitioning away from meat may be facilitated by meat substitutes. However, these are not always accepted as suitable alternatives to meat due to a combination of psychological, situational, and sensorial aspects. The influence of factors such as cooking ability on hedonics and sensory discrimination of meat and meat substitutes is currently under-researched. The present study investigated such effects. Consumers (N = 101) of varying cooking ability and food neophobia (measured using questionnaires) tasted and evaluated six mince products (one beef and five meat substitutes - three soybean-based, one mycoprotein-based, and one oat-based) prepared in a Bolognese sauce. They rated liking for overall, appearance, aroma, taste/flavour, and texture, and profiled the products sensorially using check-all-that-apply (CATA). It was found that meat substitutes can be liked just as much as, if not more than, beef in the application of Bolognese sauce. No main effects of cooking ability were found for any modality of liking, though an interaction between cooking ability and sample was found for liking of flavour/taste. Consumers’ ability to sensorially discriminate between the Bolognese sauces was not dependent on their cooking ability. Several attributes that contributed to (dis)liking were identified. An additional online sample (N = 288) completed only the cooking ability and food neophobia questionnaires. A negative relationship was detected between cooking ability and food neophobia for the combined consumer and online datasets (total N = 389).

Keywords
Cooking ability, food neophobia, consumers, meat substitutes, CATA, liking
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-58563 (URN)10.1016/j.foodqual.2022.104563 (DOI)s2.0-S0950329322000386 (Scopus ID)
Note

This work was supported by a grant from FORMAS – Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, grant number 2018–01867. 

Available from: 2022-02-16 Created: 2022-02-16 Last updated: 2023-07-06Bibliographically approved
Collier, E. S., Harris, K. L., Bendtsen, M., Norman, C. & Niimi, J. (2023). Just a matter of taste?: Understanding rationalizations for dairy consumption and their associations with sensory expectations of plant-based milk alternatives. Food Quality and Preference, 104, Article ID 104745.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Just a matter of taste?: Understanding rationalizations for dairy consumption and their associations with sensory expectations of plant-based milk alternatives
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2023 (English)In: Food Quality and Preference, ISSN 0950-3293, E-ISSN 1873-6343, Vol. 104, article id 104745Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although knowledge surrounding the obstacles omnivorous consumers face when substituting meat products with plant-based alternatives has increased dramatically, less is known about their perspectives on plant-based alternatives to dairy products. Here, these perspectives are assessed in two survey-based studies. Study 1 (N = 175) adapts an existing scale (the 4Ns of meat consumption) to dairy products in an effort to identify similarities and differences between rationalizations for meat and dairy consumption. This 16-item scale quantifies four factors (Natural, Necessary, Normal, and Nice) describing common rationalizations for meat consumption. The results revealed that the 4Ns transfer well to the dairy category, and that endorsement of dairy products as Nice was the strongest predictor of dairy consumption, relative to the other 3Ns. This is further supported by evaluation of consumers’ own qualitative descriptions of why they do or do not consume meat/dairy products, where “taste” was the most frequently used word in both categories. Study 2 replicates the relationships between dairy 4Ns scores and reported dairy consumption found in Study 1 and builds upon these results by showing that 4N score could accurately categorize consumers as frequent (N = 192) or infrequent (N = 210) consumers of plant-based milk alternatives (PBMAs). Differences in consumers’ expectations for the sensory characteristics of cow’s milk and PBMAs are identified, and the impact of rationalization (total 4N score) on the likelihood of expected sensory attribute associations is described. The role of rationalization in shaping sensory expectations and impacting dietary choices, in particular resistance to adopting PBMAs, is discussed.

Keywords
Sustainability, Consumer behavior, Rationalization, Plant-based alternatives, Dairy consumption
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-61123 (URN)10.1016/j.foodqual.2022.104745 (DOI)
Note

This work was supported by funding from FORMAS – Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences, and Spatial Planning, grant number 2020-02839.

Available from: 2022-10-31 Created: 2022-10-31 Last updated: 2023-07-06Bibliographically approved
Niimi, J., Ahlinder, A., Nilsson Pingel, T., Niimi, C., Höglund, E., Öhgren, C., . . . Nielsen, T. (2023). Saltiness enhancement: Impact of acid added to bread with heterogeneously distributed sodium chloride. Lebensmittel-Wissenschaft + Technologie, 176, Article ID 114557.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Saltiness enhancement: Impact of acid added to bread with heterogeneously distributed sodium chloride
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2023 (English)In: Lebensmittel-Wissenschaft + Technologie, ISSN 0023-6438, E-ISSN 1096-1127, Vol. 176, article id 114557Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The current global sodium consumption exceeds recommended daily intakes and there is a great need to reduce the sodium content in foods for a healthier society. The current study investigated the effect of combining sensory interaction principles and heterogeneous distribution of NaCl in bread on sensory properties, structure, and NaCl distribution. Breads were prepared in three different arrangements of NaCl distribution: homogenous, layered, and layered with lactic acid. Within each arrangement, four NaCl levels were tested. The breads were evaluated by a sensory panel for perceived saltiness, sourness, and qualitative texture, measured for stiffness, and the NaCl distribution was determined by X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM). Perceived saltiness was significantly enhanced in breads beyond heterogeneous NaCl distribution when lactic acid was added. Stiffness measurements were affected by layering of bread, the layers without NaCl were stiffer with an increase in overall salt concentration. The heterogeneous distribution of NaCl in layered breads could be visualised by XFM and textural consequences of layering bread are discussed. The current study demonstrates the potential of combining principles of pulsation of taste and sensory interactions together to enhance salt perception, and hence suggesting the approach as a possible further strategy for NaCl reduction in bread.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2023
Keywords
Heterogeneous salt distribution, Perception, Pulsation, Salt, Sensory interactions, Fluorescence microscopy, Food products, Lactic acid, Sensory perception, Stiffness, Textures, 'current, Heterogeneous distributions, Recommended daily intakes, Sensory panels, Sensory properties, Stiffness measurements, X-ray fluorescence microscopy, Sodium chloride
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-63980 (URN)10.1016/j.lwt.2023.114557 (DOI)2-s2.0-85147538587 (Scopus ID)
Note

Correspondence Address: Niimi J, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Sweden. Funding details: Västra Götalandsregionen, RUN 2020–00378; Funding details: VINNOVA, 2020–01824; Funding text 1: The measurements indicated only a little NaCl migration after baking, freezing, storage and thawing, since sharp changes in the chlorine signals were not observed, but rather a gradual transition between the layers (Fig. S6). Also, the signal did not drop to zero in the centre of the layers with no added NaCl. The amount of NaCl migration appeared to be so small that it is not expected to have a significant impact on the perceived saltiness of the breads. Additional measurements were performed using ICP-OES and IC to investigate if the migration of sodium is larger than the observed chlorine migration in the XFM measurements. The migration of sodium was similar or less to that of chlorine, which supported the conclusions drawn from the XFM results (for methodology and a summary of the ICP-OES/IC results see S2.0 and Table S2 in the supplementary material). Given that the ICP-OES/IC measurements showed that chlorine migrated in a similarly strong manner to sodium, it is reasonable to assume that the sodium distribution was adequately represented by chlorine. These measurements with XFM demonstrated its applicability in measuring chlorine ions in bread. Previous applications of XFM were on plant materials such as leaves, seedlings, barley grains, and rice kernels to measure distribution of ions such as zinc, calcium, potassium, and manganese among others. The results demonstrate that XFM can be a useful tool in confirming heterogenous distribution of chlorine ions of NaCl in processed food stuffs, such as breads.This study was performed under the project ReduSalt – Salt Reduction in Foods, a project funded by Sweden's Innovation Agency (Vinnova), grant number 2020–01824. The financial support by Region Västra Götaland, Sweden, grant number RUN 2020–00378, is also gratefully acknowledged.  Funding text 2: This study was performed under the project ReduSalt – Salt Reduction in Foods, a project funded by Sweden's Innovation Agency (Vinnova) , grant number 2020–01824 . The financial support by Region Västra Götaland, Sweden , grant number RUN 2020–00378 

Available from: 2023-02-22 Created: 2023-02-22 Last updated: 2023-06-08Bibliographically approved
Loren, N., Niimi, J., Höglund, E., Albin, R., Rytter, E., Bjerre, K. & Nielsen, T. (2023). Sodium reduction in foods: Challenges and strategies for technical solutions. Journal of Food Science, 88(3), 885
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sodium reduction in foods: Challenges and strategies for technical solutions
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Food Science, ISSN 0022-1147, E-ISSN 1750-3841, Vol. 88, no 3, p. 885-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In many parts of the world, sodium consumption is higher than recommended levels, representing one of the most important food-related health challenges and leading to considerable economical costs for society. Therefore, there is a need to find technical solutions for sodium reduction that can be implemented by food producers and within food services. The aims of this review are to discuss the barriers related to sodium reduction and to highlight a variety of technical solutions. The barriers relate to consumer perception, microbiology, processing, and physicochemistry. Existing technical solutions include inhomogeneous salt distribution, coated salt particles, changing particle sizes and forms, surface coating, multisensory combinations, sodium replacements, double emulsions, adapted serum release by microstructure design, and adapted brittleness by microstructure design. These solutions, their implementation and the associated challenges, and applicable product categories are described. Some of these solutions are ready for use or are in their early development stages. Many solutions are promising, but in most cases, some form of adaptation or optimization is needed before application in specific products, and care must always be taken to ensure food safety. For instance, further research and innovation are required in the dynamic evolution of saltiness perception, consumer acceptance, the binding and migration of sodium, juiciness, microbiological safety, and the timing of salt addition during processing. Once implemented, these solutions will undoubtedly support food producers and food services in reducing sodium content and extend the application of the solutions to different foods. © 2022 Research Institutes of Sweden, Swedish Food Federation and Lyckeby Culinar AB.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley and Sons Inc, 2023
Keywords
food, inhomogeneous salt distribution, multisensory, safety, sodium reduction, technical solutions
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-63988 (URN)10.1111/1750-3841.16433 (DOI)2-s2.0-85147016942 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Correspondence Address: Lorén, N. RISE Agriculture and Food, Sweden; email: niklas.loren@ri.se;

Funding details: VINNOVA, 2020‐01824; Funding text 1: This review has been compiled within ReduSalt – Salt Reduction in Foods, a project funded by Sweden's Innovation Agency (Vinnova), grant number 2020‐01824.

Available from: 2023-02-15 Created: 2023-02-15 Last updated: 2023-07-03Bibliographically approved
Costa, E., Niimi, J. & Collier, E. S. (2023). The relationship between food neophobia and hedonic ratings of novel foods may be mediated by emotional arousal. Food Quality and Preference, 109, Article ID 104931.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The relationship between food neophobia and hedonic ratings of novel foods may be mediated by emotional arousal
2023 (English)In: Food Quality and Preference, ISSN 0950-3293, E-ISSN 1873-6343, Vol. 109, article id 104931Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Seafood could support the transition away from terrestrial animal-source foods towards more sustainable protein sources. Food neophobia (FN), the reluctance to eat novel foods (which also extends to many familiar foods including seafood), is a known barrier to dietary change. This study investigates the relationship between FN and consumers’ acceptance of novel surimi-based products shaped to resemble pasta; and explores the role of emotional arousal experienced during tasting. Consumers (N = 211) completed the Food Neophobia Scale prior to the tasting session and were quasi-randomized to either the blind (N = 107; given no information about the content of the samples) or informed condition (N = 104; informed that the samples derived from fish), to ensure a similar FN distribution across groups. Respondents tasted three variants (pollock, cod, or salmon) of a surimi-based product at a central location in Sweden. Each sample was rated in terms of hedonics, experienced emotional arousal (from 1-relaxed to 7-anxious), overall perceived aroma and flavor intensity, and freely described for flavor character. Attitudes (positive/negative) towards the concept were also described by respondents with free text. In line with previous studies, results showed negative associations between FN and both hedonic ratings and purchase intention. Moreover, mediation analysis suggested that the relationship between FN and hedonic liking was indirectly explained by emotional arousal, implying that higher arousal may be mechanistic in describing how FN negatively impacts liking. The effect of FN was, however, not observed for the salmon sample which evoked higher levels of arousal overall and may have also been perceived as more familiar due to high salmon consumption in Sweden. These results support the arousal hypothesis of FN and contribute to further understanding the mechanisms underpinning FN, highlighting the relevance of incorporating emotional measurements in sensory evaluations. © 2023 The Author(s)

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2023
Keywords
Arousal, Consumer acceptance, Food neophobia, Liking, Novel foods, Seafood
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-65719 (URN)10.1016/j.foodqual.2023.104931 (DOI)2-s2.0-85164496069 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Correspondence Address: E. Costa, RISE, Frans Perssons väg 6, 412-76, Sweden; email: elena.costa@ri.se; 

This work was supported by funding from FORMAS – Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences, and Spatial Planning, for the project BLUE FOOD - Centre for the seafood of the future (grant number 2020-02834).  

Available from: 2023-08-09 Created: 2023-08-09 Last updated: 2023-10-30Bibliographically approved
Gärtner, A.-K., Matullat, I., Genuttis, D., Engelhardt, S., Sveinsdóttir, K., Niimi, J. & Rusu, A. (2023). Vegan spread applications of alternative protein from torula yeast: product development and consumer perception. Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, 7, Article ID 1285883.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vegan spread applications of alternative protein from torula yeast: product development and consumer perception
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2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, E-ISSN 2571-581X, Vol. 7, article id 1285883Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Alternative protein sources are gaining attraction in food industry and consumers. Proteins obtained by single-cell organisms, such as torula yeast, are of enormous interest, as they are highly scalable, efficient, and sustainable, and the production costs are comparably low. Nevertheless, proteins obtained from yeasts are still mostly known and studied for feed applications, despite their nutritional, functional, and sensory benefits for various food applications. Testing consumer acceptance of products, especially products containing alternative proteins provides insights into, e.g., market success, consumer perception, and optimization potential. In this study, the development of two vegan spread powders, high in protein and containing torula yeast as an alternative protein source, is introduced. The result of food product development using torula yeast were “Leberwurst”-style (14.7% protein) and a “Balkan”-style (9.7% protein) spreads both meeting the criteria “at least 20% kcal from proteins of total product kcal” and thus claimable as “high-protein.” The application of the alternative protein from torula yeast within the final products was studied by a consumer acceptance test (n = 123) within three different countries (Germany, Iceland, and Sweden). Consumers also rated their trust in food production actors, the food industry in particular, and their willingness to try new foods. Overall, both spreads received acceptance values in the range of “like slightly.” It is noticeable that the consumers liked the spread “Balkan style” more than “Leberwurst”-style. The background variables revealed higher neophobic characteristics of Icelandic consumers compared with Swedish or German consumers. However, German consumers felt transparency, and communication was missing, but Icelandic consumers, in general, had more trust in the overall food value chain. This knowledge allows for the development of strategies that address cultural-specific barriers and capitalize on cultural values that promote openness to culinary innovation. The identification of cultural variations in consumer preferences emphasizes the need for customized approaches to product development and marketing. These findings could have implications for businesses and policymakers in understanding and catering to the preferences and concerns of consumers in these respective countries. Businesses might benefit from emphasizing transparency and improving communication strategies. This could involve providing clear information about the sourcing, production, and other aspects of the food value chain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media SA, 2023
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-71531 (URN)10.3389/fsufs.2023.1285883 (DOI)2-s2.0-85182830239 (Scopus ID)
Note

The author(s) declare financial support was received for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article. This study was carried out in the frame of the NEXTGENPROTEINS project and SYLPLANT project, respectively. NEXTGENPROTEINS has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Program under grant agreement no 862704 and SYLPLANT has received funding from the Circular Bio-based Europe Joint Undertaking and its members, under grant agreement no 101112555. Views and opinions expressed are however those of the authors only and do not necessarily reflect those of the European Union or CBE JU. Neither the European Union nor the CBE JU can be responsible for them.

Available from: 2024-01-30 Created: 2024-01-30 Last updated: 2024-01-30Bibliographically approved
Niimi, J., Hörlin, E., Oberrauter, L.-M., Sörensen, V., Norman, C., Normann, A., . . . Bergman, P. (2022). Sample discrimination through profiling with rate all that apply (RATA) using consumers is similar between home use test (HUT) and central location test (CLT). Food Quality and Preference, 95, Article ID 104377.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sample discrimination through profiling with rate all that apply (RATA) using consumers is similar between home use test (HUT) and central location test (CLT)
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2022 (English)In: Food Quality and Preference, ISSN 0950-3293, E-ISSN 1873-6343, Vol. 95, article id 104377Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The impact of testing locations, home use test (HUT) and central location test (CLT) on consumer evaluations of food products using rate all that apply (RATA) was investigated. As a case study, eight cold cuts were evaluated: four vegetarian/vegan and four meat-based products. A between-subjects design was used, whereby consumers were randomly allocated to either HUT or CLT test location (58 and 71 consumers, respectively). To retain as much similarity as possible across locations, consumers in both groups received identical bags of products with palate cleansers and instructions. Consumers evaluated the products using a lexicon consisting of 32 sensory attributes based on similar studies and benchtop tasting, using RATA with 7pt scales. A total of 30 and 31 attributes differed significantly (p < 0.05) across the products for HUT and CLT, respectively. Sample discrimination was similar between the two locations. Location significantly (p < 0.05) affected discrimination of 14 attributes, but a particular location having consistently higher attribute means was not observed. Bootstrapping of the attribute means per product showed no significant differences between the two testing locations, and multilevel regression models using Bayesian inference did not reveal marked differences in expected ratings between locations. Further comparisons of sample discrimination patterns through principal component analysis showed that the two locations were very similar, including the overlap of confidence ellipses. The between-subjects design strengthens the results: that comparable sensory profiles were obtained from different consumers in different testing locations supports the notion that RATA data from consumers can be reliably collected for relatively sensorially distinct products with minimal data compromise.

Keywords
RATA, CLT, HUT, Profiling, Consumers
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-56383 (URN)10.1016/j.foodqual.2021.104377 (DOI)
Available from: 2021-09-08 Created: 2021-09-08 Last updated: 2023-06-05Bibliographically approved
Niimi, J., Deveau, A. & Splivallo, R. (2021). Aroma and bacterial communities dramatically change with storage of fresh white truffle Tuber magnatum. Lebensmittel-Wissenschaft + Technologie, 151, Article ID 112125.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aroma and bacterial communities dramatically change with storage of fresh white truffle Tuber magnatum
2021 (English)In: Lebensmittel-Wissenschaft + Technologie, ISSN 0023-6438, E-ISSN 1096-1127, Vol. 151, article id 112125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

White truffles are highly valuable, but the aroma is susceptible to change with storage. How volatile composition and microbiome of Tuber magnatum evolve by storage time is poorly understood. Changes in bacterial community and volatile compounds of T. magnatum fruiting bodies with storage time at 23 °C were investigated. Truffles (21 fruiting bodies) were collected from different sites in Italy, Hungary, and Croatia. Single fruiting bodies were subsampled at four time points (day (D)0, 3, 6, and 9). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and microbiome composition using PCR-high throughput sequencing were used to analyse the volatiles and bacterial communities, respectively. Spoilage compounds atypical of truffles increased with storage time. Likewise, bacterial communities changed with storage time; families belonging to Xanthobacteraceae dominated at D0 and gradually evolved to more Rhizobiaceae and Pseudomonadaceae by D3 and D6, and finally with more prominent Xanthomonadaceae and Burkholderiaceae at D9. Overall, storage time had increased the diversity of bacterial communities. The microbiome and volatile data were correlated using regularised canonical correlation analysis and determined correlations between 2-methylisoborneol and five bacterial OTUs. Potential candidate bacteria and their volatile metabolites can serve as markers for truffle spoilage. The results highlighted the mechanisms by which the degradation of expensive truffles occur.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2021
Keywords
Microbiome, Shelf-life, Storage, Tuber magnatum, Volatile, White truffle, Digital storage, Gas chromatography, Mass spectrometry, Metabolites, Odors, Spoilage, Volatile organic compounds, Bacterial community, Fruiting bodies, Shelf life, Storage time, Volatile composition, Volatile compounds, Bacteria
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-56353 (URN)10.1016/j.lwt.2021.112125 (DOI)2-s2.0-85110162446 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding details: ANR-11-LABX 0002 01; Funding details: Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung; Funding details: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG, SP1191/5–1; Funding details: Agence Nationale de la Recherche, ANR; Funding text 1: J.N. is supported by the Alexander von Humboldt foundation through the Humboldt Research Fellowship for Postdoctoral Researchers. The panellists who participated in the GC-O trial are thanked for their time and effort. The Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG project SP1191/5–1) is acknowledged for financing the installation of GC-MS peripherals. AD was supported by the French National Research Agency through the Laboratory of Excellence ARBRE, Paris, France ( ANR-11-LABX 0002 01 ).

Available from: 2021-09-08 Created: 2021-09-08 Last updated: 2023-05-23Bibliographically approved
Niimi, J., Deveau, A. & Splivallo, R. (2021). Geographical-based variations in white truffle Tuber magnatum aroma is explained by quantitative differences in key volatile compounds. New Phytologist, 230(4), 1623-1638
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Geographical-based variations in white truffle Tuber magnatum aroma is explained by quantitative differences in key volatile compounds
2021 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 230, no 4, p. 1623-1638Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The factors that vary the aroma of Tuber magnatum fruiting bodies are poorly understood. The study determined the headspace aroma composition, sensory aroma profiles, maturity and bacterial communities from T. magnatum originating from Italy, Croatia, Hungary, and Serbia, and tested if truffle aroma is dependent on provenance and if fruiting body volatiles are explained by maturity and/or bacterial communities. Headspace volatile profiles were determined using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry–olfactometry (GC-MS-O) and aroma of fruiting body extracts were sensorially assessed. Fruiting body maturity was estimated through spore melanisation. Bacterial community was determined using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Main odour active compounds were present in all truffles but varied in concentration. Aroma of truffle extracts were sensorially discriminated by sites. However, volatile profiles of individual fruiting bodies varied more within sites than across geographic area, while maturity level did not play a role. Bacterial communities varied highly and were partially explained by provenance. A few rare bacterial operational taxonomical units associated with a select few nonodour active volatile compounds. Specificities of the aroma of T. magnatum truffles are more likely to be linked to individual properties than provenance. Some constituents of bacteria may provide biomarkers of provenance and be linked to nonodour active volatiles. © 2021 The Authors 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2021
Keywords
aroma, bacterial community, geographical origin, maturity, sensory, Tuber magnatum, volatile, white truffle
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-52614 (URN)10.1111/nph.17259 (DOI)2-s2.0-85102279769 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-03-18 Created: 2021-03-18 Last updated: 2023-05-23Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2642-283x

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