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Collier, Elizabeth SORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4730-6328
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Publications (10 of 26) Show all publications
Costa, E., Bergman, P., Niimi, J. & Collier, E. S. (2024). Exploring seafood choices at the point of purchase among a sample of Swedish consumers. British Food Journal, 126(13), 269-285
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring seafood choices at the point of purchase among a sample of Swedish consumers
2024 (English)In: British Food Journal, ISSN 0007-070X, E-ISSN 1758-4108, Vol. 126, no 13, p. 269-285Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Seafood consumption in Sweden is below the national recommendations and limited to very few species. This study aims to explore the factors shaping seafood choices at the point of purchase among a sample of current consumers in Sweden, and examines their attitudes regarding seafood consumption more broadly. Design/methodology/approach: Convenience sampling was used to recruit consumers planning to purchase seafood at a supermarket in Sweden. Participants’ shopping trip was recorded using wearable eye tracking glasses and, upon completion, semi-structured interviews were conducted using a cued retrospective think aloud method. This exploratory study integrates qualitative data (N = 39) with eye tracking data (N = 34), to explore how seafood choices unfold when consumers purchase at the point of purchase. Findings: Purchases were mostly restricted to familiar seafood species. Four interlinked main themes were identified from thematic analysis of the interview data: Ambivalence, Nice and Necessary, Proficiency with Seafood and External Influences. Sustainability information (e.g. certifications) faced strong competition from other visual elements at the point of purchase, receiving less attention than product imagery and pricing information. Originality/value: This study is the first to explore the factors shaping seafood choices of current consumers at the point of purchase. The unique approach, combining explicit and implicit measures, enriches understanding of the factors influencing seafood choices and how these may interrelate. The results are valuable for the industry and contribute to the literature by identifying possible routes to improve seafood sustainability communication.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Publishing, 2024
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-73251 (URN)10.1108/BFJ-08-2023-0702 (DOI)2-s2.0-85192569885 (Scopus ID)
Note

 This project was funded by Blue Food – Centre for future seafood, with contributions fromFORMAS – a Swedish Research Council for Sustainable Development (grant number 2020-02834) andRegion V€astra G€otaland (grant number RUN 2020-00352)

Available from: 2024-05-23 Created: 2024-05-23 Last updated: 2024-05-23Bibliographically approved
Ulfsdotter Gunnarsson, K., Collier, E. S., McCambridge, J. & Bendtsen, M. (2024). Randomized study of two different consent procedures on recall: a study within a digital alcohol intervention trial. Trials, 25(1), Article ID 5.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Randomized study of two different consent procedures on recall: a study within a digital alcohol intervention trial
2024 (English)In: Trials, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 25, no 1, article id 5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Individuals’ comprehension of the information provided in consent forms should fundamentally influence whether to participate initially in a study and later whether to remain a participant. Existing evidence, however, suggests that participants do not thoroughly read, comprehend, or recall the information in consent forms. This study aimed to better understand how well participants recalled trial procedure information in the consent materials they received prior to taking part in a trial of a digital alcohol intervention. Method: This study was nested within an online effectiveness trial. The study included a contrast between two layout approaches to present the trial procedure information: one where all materials were shown on the same page (One page) and one where participants had to click on links to get materials for certain parts of the study information (Active request). Recall of trial procedures was measured 2 months post-randomization with four questions. Participants were also asked to leave a comment after each question. Result: Of the 2437 individuals who registered interest in the parent trial, 1197 were randomized to One page and 1240 were randomized to Active request. Approximately 90% consented to participate and 53% of the participants responded to the recall questionnaire. Contrasting the consent layout showed no marked differences between groups in three out of the four questions on recall of trial procedures. There was, however, evidence that recall of aspects of how personal data would be handled during the trial did differ between the two groups, with the Active request group reporting less recall than the One page group. Free-text comments were used to give nuance to the quantitative analysis. Conclusion: Participants exposed to different layouts of trial procedure information exhibited varying levels of information recall 2 months after consenting. The findings highlight the influence of the presentation of consent forms, which should be given attention when designing trials. Trial registration: ISRCTN ISRCTN48317451. Registered 6 December 2018, https://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN48317451. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central Ltd, 2024
Keywords
Consent Forms, Humans, Informed Consent, Mental Recall, Research Design, Surveys and Questionnaires, adult, article, attention, controlled study, female, human, identifiable information, intervention study, quantitative analysis, questionnaire, randomized controlled trial, recall, methodology
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-71931 (URN)10.1186/s13063-023-07855-3 (DOI)2-s2.0-85181233599 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2022-00193
Note

 This study was conducted under the auspices of the Alcohol Research Council of the Swedish Alcohol Retailing Monopoly (grant numbers 2019-0056 and 2020-0043) and the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life, and Welfare (grant number 2022-00193)

Available from: 2024-02-27 Created: 2024-02-27 Last updated: 2024-02-27Bibliographically approved
Collier, E. S., Blomqvist, J. & Bendtsen, M. (2024). Satisfaction with a digital support tool targeting alcohol consumption: perspectives from participants in a randomized control trial. Alcohol and Alcoholism, 59(1), Article ID agad070.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Satisfaction with a digital support tool targeting alcohol consumption: perspectives from participants in a randomized control trial
2024 (English)In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 59, no 1, article id agad070Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: Intervention design may be improved through evaluating the feedback from those who have been exposed to such interventions. As such, here the perspectives of the intervention group from a recent randomized control trial investigating the effectiveness of a digital alcohol intervention, in terms of perceived suitability and usefulness of the support tool they engaged with, were investigated. Methods: Respondents (N=475; 45% of the intervention group) answered five quantitative questions addressing user experience, completed the 10-item System Useability Scale, and were offered the opportunity to write free-text feedback. Quantitative measures were analysed using ordinal and linear regression with baseline characteristics as predictors, and free-text responses were evaluated using content analysis. Results: Overall, respondents were positive towards the intervention in terms of it fitting their needs, the usefulness of the tools included, and the usefulness of text message content. The intervention was perceived as more helpful by respondents with lower total weekly alcohol consumption, higher self-reported confidence in their ability to reduce their drinking, and the perceived importance there of, at baseline. The free-text comments revealed the value of reminders as prompts to reflect on one’s own drinking behaviour. Nonetheless, criticisms of the intervention were voiced, primarily highlighting the repetitive nature of the reminders and the lack of individuation in advice. Some also feltlike the intervention was impersonal and targeted only a specific drinking pattern. Conclusions: Experiences of the intervention group in this trial were generally positive, though there may be demand for more individualised, targeted intervention design.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2024
Keywords
alcohol, behavioural change, experiences, feedback, intervention design, adult, alcohol consumption, article, behavior change, content analysis, controlled study, drinking behavior, female, human, individualization, linear regression analysis, male, randomized controlled trial, satisfaction, text messaging
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-71925 (URN)10.1093/alcalc/agad070 (DOI)2-s2.0-85182883268 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2022–00193)
Note

This study was conducted under the auspices of the Alcohol Research Council of the Swedish Alcohol Retailing Monopoly (grant numbers 2019–0056 and 2020–0043) and the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life, and Welfare (grant number 2022–00193)

Available from: 2024-02-27 Created: 2024-02-27 Last updated: 2024-02-27Bibliographically approved
Collier, E. S., Costa, E., Harris, K. L., Bendtsen, M. & Niimi, J. (2024). Still just a matter of taste?: Sensorial appreciation of seafood is associated with more frequent and diverse consumption. Appetite, 198, Article ID 107369.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Still just a matter of taste?: Sensorial appreciation of seafood is associated with more frequent and diverse consumption
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2024 (English)In: Appetite, ISSN 0195-6663, E-ISSN 1095-8304, Vol. 198, article id 107369Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Improving health and sustainability outcomes in WEIRD (Western, Educated, Industrial, Rich, Democratic) nations necessitates a reduction in red meat consumption. Seafood is often overlooked in achieving this goal. However, simply consuming more of familiar fish species places high stress on production of these species. For this reason, diversification of seafood consumption is also critical. Here the motives for seafood consumption (frequency and diversity) are investigated across two studies by adapting the 4Ns survey to the seafood category. This 16-item survey measures four factors underpinning meat consumption: namely that it is ‘Natural’, ‘Necessary’, ‘Normal’ and ‘Nice’. Swedish consumers’ hedonic and sensory expectations of two herring concepts (traditional pickled contra novel minced and presented as a burger) are also evaluated in relation to the 4Ns. Study 1 (N = 304) revealed that the seafood 4Ns scale had a similar underlying structure to that of meat and had good test-retest reliability. Study 2 (N = 514) showed that consumers expected to like the pickled herring (associated with being ‘seasoned’, ‘salty’, ‘sweet’, ‘firm’, ‘juicy’, ‘chewy’, and ‘slimy’) more than the minced herring (associated with being ‘mushy’, ‘fishy’, ‘grainy’, ‘dry’ and having ‘small bones’), and that ‘Nice’ scores affected expectations of both herring concepts. Food neophobia correlated inversely with seafood consumption frequency, expected liking, the ‘Nice’ subscale, and food agency. Critically, in both studies, enjoyment of seafood (higher ‘Nice’ scores) predicted more frequent and diverse seafood consumption, whilst agreeing that seafood is ‘Necessary’ for health predicted only consumption frequency, not diversity. Communicating the positive sensory attributes of seafood and developing novel product concepts in ways that disconfirm sceptical consumers’ negative sensory expectations may increase acceptance of both familiar and unfamiliar seafood concepts. © 2024 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2024
Keywords
Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Animals; Consumer Behavior; Female; Fishes; Food Preferences; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Seafood; Surveys and Questionnaires; Sweden; Taste; Young Adult; adolescent; adult; aged; animal; consumer attitude; female; fish; food preference; human; male; middle aged; psychology; questionnaire; sea food; Sweden; taste; young adult
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-73287 (URN)10.1016/j.appet.2024.107369 (DOI)2-s2.0-85191499142 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2020-02834Region Västra Götaland, RUN 2020-00352
Note

The project has been funded by Blue Food - Centre for future seafood, with contributions from Formas -  a Swedish Research Council for Sustainable Development (grant number 2020-02834) and Region Västra Götaland (grant number RUN 2020-00352).

Available from: 2024-05-23 Created: 2024-05-23 Last updated: 2024-05-27Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, S., Harris, K. L., Melin, J., Lahne, J., Wolfson, J. & Collier, E. S. (2023). An evaluation and shortening of the Cooking and Food Provisioning Action Scale (CAFPAS) using item response theory. Food Quality and Preference, 108, Article ID 104880.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An evaluation and shortening of the Cooking and Food Provisioning Action Scale (CAFPAS) using item response theory
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2023 (English)In: Food Quality and Preference, ISSN 0950-3293, E-ISSN 1873-6343, Vol. 108, article id 104880Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Cooking and Food Provisioning Action Scale (CAFPAS) is a 28-item validated tool for measuring food agency, a latent construct representing an individual's ability to make and achieve food-preparation and -provisioning goals. Here, key measurement parameters (targeting, threshold ordering, item fit, unidimensionality, differential item functioning, local dependency, and person reliability) of the CAFPAS are evaluated using a specific case of item response theory, Rasch analysis, on data from a development sample (N = 1853; 910 from Sweden; 943 from the US). Winsteps (v.5.1.7) is used for this analysis. The similarity of the Swedish version of the CAFPAS to the original is also assessed. Based on an iterative assessment of the measurement properties with different combinations of items in the development sample, ways to shorten the CAFPAS without jeopardizing construct validity or person reliability are examined. After removing items that do not fit the Rasch model, or that appear redundant in relation to other items, an 11-item version (CAFPAS-short) is suggested and tested using further Rasch analysis on both the development sample and an additional US-based validation sample (N = 1457). Scores of cooking confidence and attitudes are then modelled with measures from the CAFPAS and CAFPAS-short using frequentist and Bayesian analysis. Results suggest that the CAFPAS-short performs similarly to the full-length version, and potential future improvements to the CAFPAS are discussed. This study represents a successful application of item response theory to investigate and shorten a psychometric scale, reducing cognitive load on participants in studies using the CAFPAS whilst minimizing loss of data reliability. © 2023 The Author(s)

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2023
Keywords
Categorical measurement, Cooking ability, Food agency, Item response theory, Psychometrics
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-64425 (URN)10.1016/j.foodqual.2023.104880 (DOI)2-s2.0-85154566017 (Scopus ID)
Note

Correspondence Address: E.S. Collier; RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Division of Bioeconomy and Health, Perception and Design Unit, Stockholm, Sweden; email: elizabeth.collier@ri.se; 

SK, KLH, JM, and ESC were supported by the RISE competence platform Centre for Categorical Based Measurements. KLH and ESC were supported by FORMAS - Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, grant number 2018–01867. JAW was supported by the National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), grant number K01DK119166.

Available from: 2023-05-11 Created: 2023-05-11 Last updated: 2023-10-31Bibliographically approved
Costa, E., Wrange, A.-L., Collier, E. S., Niimi, J. & Strand, Å. (2023). Beyond raw: Investigating alternative preparation methods as a tool to increase acceptance of oysters in Sweden. Future Foods, 7, Article ID 100217.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond raw: Investigating alternative preparation methods as a tool to increase acceptance of oysters in Sweden
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2023 (English)In: Future Foods, ISSN 2666-8335, Vol. 7, article id 100217Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The role of seafood in supporting transitions towards more sustainable and healthier diets is often overlooked. Oysters, for example, are a nutrient dense aquatic food whose production requires no feed, freshwater, or land use. However, oyster consumption in Sweden is limited, possibly in part due to being traditionally served raw. This study investigated consumer acceptance of oysters when cooked and prepared to resemble familiar foods and examined whether food neophobia (FN) was related to liking. Four oyster-based samples (raw oyster, oyster crepe, oyster burger, and oyster soup) were evaluated in an ecologically valid setting. Participants (N=102; convenience sampling) rated the samples in terms of hedonics (expected liking and liking after tasting), described which aspects of the samples were liked/disliked, and reported the contexts in which oyster consumption is perceived as appropriate. The findings suggest that FN was negatively associated with expected liking of raw oysters, but not with expected liking for cooked oyster-based products that were cooked to resemble familiar foods. On the other hand, familiarity with oysters was positively associated with expected liking of raw oysters. This suggests that expanding oyster preparations beyond its traditional raw format could be a valuable strategy to promote oyster consumption in Sweden. © 2023 The Author(s)

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2023
Keywords
Consumer acceptance, Food neophobia, Liking, Oyster consumption, Street food
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-64093 (URN)10.1016/j.fufo.2023.100217 (DOI)2-s2.0-85147933822 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Correspondence Address: Costa E, RISE, Sweden; email: elena.costa@ri.se; Funding details: Svenska Forskningsrådet Formas, 2020-02834; Funding text 1: This work was supported by funding from FORMAS – Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences, and Spatial Planning, grant number 2020-02834, and satellite project funding through the Blue Food Center.; Funding text 2: Main chef developing recipes: Stefan Sandersnäs (Grebbestad folkhögskola). Food preparation: chef Stefan Sandersnäs and students in sustainable seafood education (Grebbestad folkhögskola). Main chef in food truck: Loppa Alexius. Research assistants: Matej Bozon and Isabelle Johansson. Professional oyster shucker: Mattias Gustavsson (Frölunda lilla saluhall). Data collection and technical support (permits, seating area etc.): Kristoffer Nilsson and Peter Nylund (Stadsbyggnadskontoret). Food truck: Lindholmen Street Food Market. Oyster raw material: Adriaan van de Plasse (Orust Shellfish). Kathryn Harris, generation of the final version of Fig. 2.

Available from: 2023-02-28 Created: 2023-02-28 Last updated: 2023-10-30Bibliographically approved
Niimi, J., Sörensen, V., Mihnea, M., Valentin, D., Bergman, P. & Collier, E. (2023). Does cooking ability affect consumer perception and appreciation of plant-based protein in Bolognese sauces?. Food Quality and Preference, 99, Article ID 104563.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does cooking ability affect consumer perception and appreciation of plant-based protein in Bolognese sauces?
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2023 (English)In: Food Quality and Preference, ISSN 0950-3293, E-ISSN 1873-6343, Vol. 99, article id 104563Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Encouraging consumers to reduce their meat consumption is imperative in mitigating climate change effects related to the food industry. For some, transitioning away from meat may be facilitated by meat substitutes. However, these are not always accepted as suitable alternatives to meat due to a combination of psychological, situational, and sensorial aspects. The influence of factors such as cooking ability on hedonics and sensory discrimination of meat and meat substitutes is currently under-researched. The present study investigated such effects. Consumers (N = 101) of varying cooking ability and food neophobia (measured using questionnaires) tasted and evaluated six mince products (one beef and five meat substitutes - three soybean-based, one mycoprotein-based, and one oat-based) prepared in a Bolognese sauce. They rated liking for overall, appearance, aroma, taste/flavour, and texture, and profiled the products sensorially using check-all-that-apply (CATA). It was found that meat substitutes can be liked just as much as, if not more than, beef in the application of Bolognese sauce. No main effects of cooking ability were found for any modality of liking, though an interaction between cooking ability and sample was found for liking of flavour/taste. Consumers’ ability to sensorially discriminate between the Bolognese sauces was not dependent on their cooking ability. Several attributes that contributed to (dis)liking were identified. An additional online sample (N = 288) completed only the cooking ability and food neophobia questionnaires. A negative relationship was detected between cooking ability and food neophobia for the combined consumer and online datasets (total N = 389).

Keywords
Cooking ability, food neophobia, consumers, meat substitutes, CATA, liking
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-58563 (URN)10.1016/j.foodqual.2022.104563 (DOI)s2.0-S0950329322000386 (Scopus ID)
Note

This work was supported by a grant from FORMAS – Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, grant number 2018–01867. 

Available from: 2022-02-16 Created: 2022-02-16 Last updated: 2024-03-06Bibliographically approved
Collier, E. S., Harris, K. L., Jecks, M. & Bendtsen, M. (2023). Don’t throw the individual perspective out while waiting for systemic change. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 46, Article ID e154.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Don’t throw the individual perspective out while waiting for systemic change
2023 (English)In: Behavioral and Brain Sciences, ISSN 0140-525X, E-ISSN 1469-1825, Vol. 46, article id e154Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although it is clear that i-frame approaches cannot stand alone, the impact of s-frame changes can plateau. Combinations of these approaches may best reflect what we know about behavior and how to support behavioral change. Interactions between i-frame and s-frame thinking are explored here using two examples: alcohol consumption and meat consumption.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2023
Keywords
alcohol consumption; behavior change; human; meat consumption; review; thinking
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-67890 (URN)10.1017/S0140525X23000948 (DOI)2-s2.0-85171896326 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-27 Created: 2023-11-27 Last updated: 2023-11-27Bibliographically approved
Collier, E. S., Blomqvist, J., Crawford, J., McCambridge, J. & Bendtsen, M. (2023). Exploratory mixed methods analysis of self-authored content from participants in a digital alcohol intervention trial. Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, 18(1), Article ID 60.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploratory mixed methods analysis of self-authored content from participants in a digital alcohol intervention trial
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2023 (English)In: Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, E-ISSN 1747-597X, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 60Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Digital interventions readily permit data capture of participant engagement with them. If future interventions are intended to be more interactive, tailored, or a useful resource offered to users, it may be valuable to examine such data. One module available in a digital alcohol intervention recently tested in a randomised control trial offered participants the opportunity to self-author prompts that were sent to them by a text message at a time of their choosing. This study thus aimed to evaluate these self-authored prompts to increase knowledge on how individuals negotiate behaviour change and assess whether intervention content can be improved in the future. Methods: The self-authored prompts were evaluated qualitatively using a combination of content and thematic analysis. The identified themes and subcategories are exemplified using anonymized quotes, and the frequency that each identified theme was coded for among the prompts was calculated. Associations between baseline characteristics and the odds of authoring a prompt at all, as well as a prompt within each theme, were investigated using logistic regression. Results: Five themes were identified (Encouragement Style, Level of Awareness, Reminders of reasons to reduce/quit, Strategies to reduce/quit, and Timescale), all with several subcategories. The prompts module was more likely to be used by women and older individuals, as well as those for whom reducing alcohol consumption was perceived as important, or who felt they had the know-how to do so. Participants who had immediate access to the support tool (intervention group) were more than twice as likely to author a prompt (OR = 2.36; probability of association > 99%) compared to those with 4-month delayed access (control group). Conclusions: Individuals who engaged with the prompts module showed evidence of using the information provided in the support tool in an active way, with several showing goal setting and making plans to change their drinking behaviour. Individuals also used this opportunity to remind themselves of personal and specific reasons they wanted to change their drinking, as well as to encourage themselves to do so. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central Ltd, 2023
Keywords
Female; Humans; Research Design; Text Messaging; controlled study; female; human; methodology; randomized controlled trial; text messaging
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-67884 (URN)10.1186/s13011-023-00569-4 (DOI)2-s2.0-85175151772 (Scopus ID)
Note

This study was conducted under the auspices of the Alcohol Research Council of the Swedish Alcohol Retailing Monopoly (grant numbers 2019-0056 and 2020-0043) and the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life, and Welfare (grant number 2022 − 00193).

Available from: 2023-11-29 Created: 2023-11-29 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Collier, E. S., Harris, K. L., Bendtsen, M., Norman, C. & Niimi, J. (2023). Just a matter of taste?: Understanding rationalizations for dairy consumption and their associations with sensory expectations of plant-based milk alternatives. Food Quality and Preference, 104, Article ID 104745.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Just a matter of taste?: Understanding rationalizations for dairy consumption and their associations with sensory expectations of plant-based milk alternatives
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2023 (English)In: Food Quality and Preference, ISSN 0950-3293, E-ISSN 1873-6343, Vol. 104, article id 104745Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although knowledge surrounding the obstacles omnivorous consumers face when substituting meat products with plant-based alternatives has increased dramatically, less is known about their perspectives on plant-based alternatives to dairy products. Here, these perspectives are assessed in two survey-based studies. Study 1 (N = 175) adapts an existing scale (the 4Ns of meat consumption) to dairy products in an effort to identify similarities and differences between rationalizations for meat and dairy consumption. This 16-item scale quantifies four factors (Natural, Necessary, Normal, and Nice) describing common rationalizations for meat consumption. The results revealed that the 4Ns transfer well to the dairy category, and that endorsement of dairy products as Nice was the strongest predictor of dairy consumption, relative to the other 3Ns. This is further supported by evaluation of consumers’ own qualitative descriptions of why they do or do not consume meat/dairy products, where “taste” was the most frequently used word in both categories. Study 2 replicates the relationships between dairy 4Ns scores and reported dairy consumption found in Study 1 and builds upon these results by showing that 4N score could accurately categorize consumers as frequent (N = 192) or infrequent (N = 210) consumers of plant-based milk alternatives (PBMAs). Differences in consumers’ expectations for the sensory characteristics of cow’s milk and PBMAs are identified, and the impact of rationalization (total 4N score) on the likelihood of expected sensory attribute associations is described. The role of rationalization in shaping sensory expectations and impacting dietary choices, in particular resistance to adopting PBMAs, is discussed.

Keywords
Sustainability, Consumer behavior, Rationalization, Plant-based alternatives, Dairy consumption
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-61123 (URN)10.1016/j.foodqual.2022.104745 (DOI)
Note

This work was supported by funding from FORMAS – Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences, and Spatial Planning, grant number 2020-02839.

Available from: 2022-10-31 Created: 2022-10-31 Last updated: 2023-07-06Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4730-6328

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