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Collier, E. S., Costa, E., Harris, K. L., Bendtsen, M. & Niimi, J. (2024). Still just a matter of taste?: Sensorial appreciation of seafood is associated with more frequent and diverse consumption. Appetite, 198, Article ID 107369.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Still just a matter of taste?: Sensorial appreciation of seafood is associated with more frequent and diverse consumption
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2024 (English)In: Appetite, ISSN 0195-6663, E-ISSN 1095-8304, Vol. 198, article id 107369Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Improving health and sustainability outcomes in WEIRD (Western, Educated, Industrial, Rich, Democratic) nations necessitates a reduction in red meat consumption. Seafood is often overlooked in achieving this goal. However, simply consuming more of familiar fish species places high stress on production of these species. For this reason, diversification of seafood consumption is also critical. Here the motives for seafood consumption (frequency and diversity) are investigated across two studies by adapting the 4Ns survey to the seafood category. This 16-item survey measures four factors underpinning meat consumption: namely that it is ‘Natural’, ‘Necessary’, ‘Normal’ and ‘Nice’. Swedish consumers’ hedonic and sensory expectations of two herring concepts (traditional pickled contra novel minced and presented as a burger) are also evaluated in relation to the 4Ns. Study 1 (N = 304) revealed that the seafood 4Ns scale had a similar underlying structure to that of meat and had good test-retest reliability. Study 2 (N = 514) showed that consumers expected to like the pickled herring (associated with being ‘seasoned’, ‘salty’, ‘sweet’, ‘firm’, ‘juicy’, ‘chewy’, and ‘slimy’) more than the minced herring (associated with being ‘mushy’, ‘fishy’, ‘grainy’, ‘dry’ and having ‘small bones’), and that ‘Nice’ scores affected expectations of both herring concepts. Food neophobia correlated inversely with seafood consumption frequency, expected liking, the ‘Nice’ subscale, and food agency. Critically, in both studies, enjoyment of seafood (higher ‘Nice’ scores) predicted more frequent and diverse seafood consumption, whilst agreeing that seafood is ‘Necessary’ for health predicted only consumption frequency, not diversity. Communicating the positive sensory attributes of seafood and developing novel product concepts in ways that disconfirm sceptical consumers’ negative sensory expectations may increase acceptance of both familiar and unfamiliar seafood concepts. © 2024 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2024
Keywords
Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Animals; Consumer Behavior; Female; Fishes; Food Preferences; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Seafood; Surveys and Questionnaires; Sweden; Taste; Young Adult; adolescent; adult; aged; animal; consumer attitude; female; fish; food preference; human; male; middle aged; psychology; questionnaire; sea food; Sweden; taste; young adult
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-73287 (URN)10.1016/j.appet.2024.107369 (DOI)2-s2.0-85191499142 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2020-02834Region Västra Götaland, RUN 2020-00352
Note

The project has been funded by Blue Food - Centre for future seafood, with contributions from Formas -  a Swedish Research Council for Sustainable Development (grant number 2020-02834) and Region Västra Götaland (grant number RUN 2020-00352).

Available from: 2024-05-23 Created: 2024-05-23 Last updated: 2024-05-27Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, S., Harris, K. L., Melin, J., Lahne, J., Wolfson, J. & Collier, E. S. (2023). An evaluation and shortening of the Cooking and Food Provisioning Action Scale (CAFPAS) using item response theory. Food Quality and Preference, 108, Article ID 104880.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An evaluation and shortening of the Cooking and Food Provisioning Action Scale (CAFPAS) using item response theory
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2023 (English)In: Food Quality and Preference, ISSN 0950-3293, E-ISSN 1873-6343, Vol. 108, article id 104880Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Cooking and Food Provisioning Action Scale (CAFPAS) is a 28-item validated tool for measuring food agency, a latent construct representing an individual's ability to make and achieve food-preparation and -provisioning goals. Here, key measurement parameters (targeting, threshold ordering, item fit, unidimensionality, differential item functioning, local dependency, and person reliability) of the CAFPAS are evaluated using a specific case of item response theory, Rasch analysis, on data from a development sample (N = 1853; 910 from Sweden; 943 from the US). Winsteps (v.5.1.7) is used for this analysis. The similarity of the Swedish version of the CAFPAS to the original is also assessed. Based on an iterative assessment of the measurement properties with different combinations of items in the development sample, ways to shorten the CAFPAS without jeopardizing construct validity or person reliability are examined. After removing items that do not fit the Rasch model, or that appear redundant in relation to other items, an 11-item version (CAFPAS-short) is suggested and tested using further Rasch analysis on both the development sample and an additional US-based validation sample (N = 1457). Scores of cooking confidence and attitudes are then modelled with measures from the CAFPAS and CAFPAS-short using frequentist and Bayesian analysis. Results suggest that the CAFPAS-short performs similarly to the full-length version, and potential future improvements to the CAFPAS are discussed. This study represents a successful application of item response theory to investigate and shorten a psychometric scale, reducing cognitive load on participants in studies using the CAFPAS whilst minimizing loss of data reliability. © 2023 The Author(s)

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2023
Keywords
Categorical measurement, Cooking ability, Food agency, Item response theory, Psychometrics
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-64425 (URN)10.1016/j.foodqual.2023.104880 (DOI)2-s2.0-85154566017 (Scopus ID)
Note

Correspondence Address: E.S. Collier; RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Division of Bioeconomy and Health, Perception and Design Unit, Stockholm, Sweden; email: elizabeth.collier@ri.se; 

SK, KLH, JM, and ESC were supported by the RISE competence platform Centre for Categorical Based Measurements. KLH and ESC were supported by FORMAS - Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, grant number 2018–01867. JAW was supported by the National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), grant number K01DK119166.

Available from: 2023-05-11 Created: 2023-05-11 Last updated: 2023-10-31Bibliographically approved
Van Meter, K., Pitenis, A., Harris, K. L., Sawyer, W. G. & Krick, B. (2023). Contact pressure dependent mechanisms of ultralow wear PTFE composites. Wear, 152, Article ID 204715.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contact pressure dependent mechanisms of ultralow wear PTFE composites
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2023 (English)In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 152, article id 204715Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One of the most dramatic reductions in the wear of PTFE has been achieved by compositing PTFE with as little as 1–5 wt% of alumina particles; this has been reported to produce wear rates K ∼10−7 mm3/Nm. The mechanisms associated with this reduction in wear are multifaceted, including 1) preventing crack propagation and delamination of the PTFE wear surface, 2) promoting tribochemistry and more recently 3) tribologically-induced breaking of the filler into nanoscale fragments to stabilize and reinforce tribofilms. However, in an effort to keep experiments comparable, many of the studies throughout the literature have focused on a narrow contact pressure range. In these experiments, we explored the effects of contact pressure on the tribological behavior of different PTFE and alumina composites, one of which is reported to achieve ultra-low wear (∼10−7 mm3/Nm) and another that is reported to only have mild reductions in wear (∼1 × 10−5 mm3/Nm) compared to unfilled PTFE (∼4 × 10−4 mm3/Nm). We found that with decreased contact pressures, the PTFE-alumina composite that was previously reported as high wear could achieve ultralow wear rates. The PTFE-alumina composite previously reported to achieve ultralow wear achieved ultralow wear at a range of low to high contact pressures, with a higher pressure limit corresponding to increases in wear. The friction behavior of PTFE-alumina composites was found to be highly dependent on contact pressure, with increasing pressures resulting in decreasing friction coefficients (∼0.5–0.17 over a 0.62–8.5 MPa range). This effect became more pronounced when the contact pressure was incrementally varied during testing resulting in up to a 70% decrease or increase in friction coefficient due to increasing or decreasing the pressure, respectively. IR spectra of the polymer wear surface showed that tribofilms rich in carboxylates and metal oxides form at the full range of contact pressures tested, even at the extremes. This formation of tribofilms at the sliding interface not only contributes to the ultralow wear of these materials, but plays a role in the friction behavior observed. From this, we gained new insight into the role, functionality and limitations of the alumina fillers. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2023
Keywords
Alumina, Contact pressure, Polytetrafluoroethylene, PTFE, Tribochemistry, Ultralow wear, Aluminum oxide, Carboxylation, Fillers, Friction, Polytetrafluoroethylenes, Tribology, Wear of materials, % reductions, Alumina composites, Contact pressures, Friction behaviour, Friction coefficients, Pressure dependent, Tribo-chemistry, Tribofilms, Wear surface
National Category
Tribology (Interacting Surfaces including Friction, Lubrication and Wear)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-64340 (URN)10.1016/j.wear.2023.204715 (DOI)2-s2.0-85151367559 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: National Science Foundation, NSF; Funding details: Division of Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation, CMMI, 1449440, 1463141, 2027029; Funding details: DuPont; Funding text 1: The authors would like to thank the many collaborators for their thoughtful comments and insight, including Christopher P. Junk, Gregory S. Blackman and Heidi Burch at DuPont. We also thank Shefik Bowen and Daniel Hallinan at FAMU-FSU for access and training to ATR-IR spectroscopy. All the authors acknowledge. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF), including the Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation (CMMI) under Grant #2027029 and #1463141 (Krick), as well as NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant #1449440 (Van Meter).; Funding text 2: The authors would like to thank the many collaborators for their thoughtful comments and insight, including Christopher P. Junk, Gregory S. Blackman and Heidi Burch at DuPont. We also thank Shefik Bowen and Daniel Hallinan at FAMU-FSU for access and training to ATR-IR spectroscopy. All the authors acknowledge. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) , including the Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation (CMMI) under Grant # 2027029 and # 1463141 (Krick), as well as NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant # 1449440 (Van Meter).

Available from: 2023-05-03 Created: 2023-05-03 Last updated: 2023-05-23Bibliographically approved
Collier, E. S., Harris, K. L., Jecks, M. & Bendtsen, M. (2023). Don’t throw the individual perspective out while waiting for systemic change. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 46, Article ID e154.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Don’t throw the individual perspective out while waiting for systemic change
2023 (English)In: Behavioral and Brain Sciences, ISSN 0140-525X, E-ISSN 1469-1825, Vol. 46, article id e154Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although it is clear that i-frame approaches cannot stand alone, the impact of s-frame changes can plateau. Combinations of these approaches may best reflect what we know about behavior and how to support behavioral change. Interactions between i-frame and s-frame thinking are explored here using two examples: alcohol consumption and meat consumption.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2023
Keywords
alcohol consumption; behavior change; human; meat consumption; review; thinking
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-67890 (URN)10.1017/S0140525X23000948 (DOI)2-s2.0-85171896326 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-27 Created: 2023-11-27 Last updated: 2023-11-27Bibliographically approved
Collier, E. S., Harris, K. L., Bendtsen, M., Norman, C. & Niimi, J. (2023). Just a matter of taste?: Understanding rationalizations for dairy consumption and their associations with sensory expectations of plant-based milk alternatives. Food Quality and Preference, 104, Article ID 104745.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Just a matter of taste?: Understanding rationalizations for dairy consumption and their associations with sensory expectations of plant-based milk alternatives
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2023 (English)In: Food Quality and Preference, ISSN 0950-3293, E-ISSN 1873-6343, Vol. 104, article id 104745Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although knowledge surrounding the obstacles omnivorous consumers face when substituting meat products with plant-based alternatives has increased dramatically, less is known about their perspectives on plant-based alternatives to dairy products. Here, these perspectives are assessed in two survey-based studies. Study 1 (N = 175) adapts an existing scale (the 4Ns of meat consumption) to dairy products in an effort to identify similarities and differences between rationalizations for meat and dairy consumption. This 16-item scale quantifies four factors (Natural, Necessary, Normal, and Nice) describing common rationalizations for meat consumption. The results revealed that the 4Ns transfer well to the dairy category, and that endorsement of dairy products as Nice was the strongest predictor of dairy consumption, relative to the other 3Ns. This is further supported by evaluation of consumers’ own qualitative descriptions of why they do or do not consume meat/dairy products, where “taste” was the most frequently used word in both categories. Study 2 replicates the relationships between dairy 4Ns scores and reported dairy consumption found in Study 1 and builds upon these results by showing that 4N score could accurately categorize consumers as frequent (N = 192) or infrequent (N = 210) consumers of plant-based milk alternatives (PBMAs). Differences in consumers’ expectations for the sensory characteristics of cow’s milk and PBMAs are identified, and the impact of rationalization (total 4N score) on the likelihood of expected sensory attribute associations is described. The role of rationalization in shaping sensory expectations and impacting dietary choices, in particular resistance to adopting PBMAs, is discussed.

Keywords
Sustainability, Consumer behavior, Rationalization, Plant-based alternatives, Dairy consumption
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-61123 (URN)10.1016/j.foodqual.2022.104745 (DOI)
Note

This work was supported by funding from FORMAS – Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences, and Spatial Planning, grant number 2020-02839.

Available from: 2022-10-31 Created: 2022-10-31 Last updated: 2023-07-06Bibliographically approved
Collier, E. S., Normann, A., Harris, K. L., Oberrauter, L.-M. & Bergman, P. (2022). Making More Sustainable Food Choices One Meal at a Time: Psychological and Practical Aspects of Meat Reduction and Substitution. Foods, 11(9), Article ID 1182.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making More Sustainable Food Choices One Meal at a Time: Psychological and Practical Aspects of Meat Reduction and Substitution
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2022 (English)In: Foods, E-ISSN 2304-8158, Vol. 11, no 9, article id 1182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Switching out meat in favour of plant-based alternatives such as meat substitutes is an important step towards eating more sustainably. Here, the aim was to identify and explore the specific barriers experienced by Swedish consumers when replacing meat with more sustainable alternatives. All meat-eating participants in this study reported some interest in reducing their meat consumption. Aspects of home-use and central-location test methods were combined by using a digital conferencing system to host cooking sessions and focus group discussions online, which was shown to be a viable setup even in this hands-on setting. The discussions targeted participants’ experience preparing meals using meat substitutes as well as their perceived motivators and barriers to reducing meat consumption. Four themes identified through thematic analysis indicated that meat-eating participants, despite their desire or intent to reduce their meat consumption, experienced barriers relating to the following: internal conflict due to holding multiple positive and negative beliefs about meat simultaneously (ambivalence), justification of eating meat (rationalisation), a desire for variety in and control over their food choices (agency), and sensitivity to the views and expectations of other people and the situational context regarding meat (social and structural factors). Possible strategies to support ambivalent individuals in aligning their behaviour with their beliefs instead of vice versa are discussed in the context of the meat paradox. Agency and practical skills, including increasing knowledge in preparing meals with plant-based proteins, likely play a role in bridging this intention–behaviour gap. © 2022 by the authors. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
climate change, consumer behaviour, cooking at home, meat paradox, meat substitutes
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-59223 (URN)10.3390/foods11091182 (DOI)2-s2.0-85129301895 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Svenska Forskningsrådet Formas, 2018-01867; Funding text 1: Funding: This research was funded by FORMAS—Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, grant number 2018-01867.

Available from: 2022-06-10 Created: 2022-06-10 Last updated: 2023-06-05Bibliographically approved
Skedung, L., Hörlin, E., Harris, K. L., Rutland, M. W., Applebaum, M., Greaves, A. & Luengo, G. (2021). A Curly Q: Is Frizz a Matter of Friction?. Perception, 50(8), 728-732
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Curly Q: Is Frizz a Matter of Friction?
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2021 (English)In: Perception, ISSN 0301-0066, E-ISSN 1468-4233, Vol. 50, no 8, p. 728-732Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The oft discussed and fretted over environmental influences on hair have led to a popular consensus which suggests that elevated temperature and humidity lead to frizzier, wilder hair. However, few attempts at actually quantifying these effects have been made. Although frizziness is usually perceived visually, here the influence of variations in temperature and humidity on the tactile perception and friction of curly and straight hair were investigated. It is shown that changes in humidity may disproportionately affect perceived frizziness of curly hair by touch due to concurrent changes in the tactile friction. © The Author(s) 2021.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE Publications Ltd, 2021
Keywords
environmental conditions, hair care, tactile friction, tactile perception
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-54705 (URN)10.1177/03010066211024442 (DOI)2-s2.0-85108305444 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding text 1: The author(s) declared the following potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: GSL, MA and AG are full employees of L’Oréal involved in research activities. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden have received funding from L’Oréal to perform this research.; Funding text 2: The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: The majority of this work was financed by L’Oréal.

Available from: 2021-06-30 Created: 2021-06-30 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Harris, K. L., Collier, E. S., Skedung, L. & Rutland, M. W. (2021). A Sticky Situation or Rough Going?: Influencing Haptic Perception of Wood Coatings Through Frictional and Topographical Design. Tribology letters, 69(3), Article ID 113.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Sticky Situation or Rough Going?: Influencing Haptic Perception of Wood Coatings Through Frictional and Topographical Design
2021 (English)In: Tribology letters, ISSN 1023-8883, E-ISSN 1573-2711, Vol. 69, no 3, article id 113Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Improving the tactile aesthetics of products that can be described as touch intensive is an increasing priority within many sectors, including the furniture industry. Understanding which physical characteristics contribute to the haptic experience of a surface, and how, is therefore highly topical. It has earlier been shown that both friction and topography affect tactile perception. Thus, two series of stimuli have been produced using standard coating techniques, with systematic variation in (physical) friction and roughness properties. This was achieved through appropriate selection of matting agents and resins. The stimuli sets were then evaluated perceptually to determine the extent to which discrimination between pairs of surfaces followed the systematic materials variation. In addition to investigating the role of the physical properties in discrimination of the surfaces, their influence on perceived pleasantness and naturalness was also studied. The results indicate that changes in tactile perception can be understood in terms of friction and roughness, and that varying the matting agents (topography) and resins (material properties) in the coatings provide the controlling factors for furniture applications. Perceived pleasantness is associated with low friction and smoother topography, whilst perceived naturalness is found to be described by an interaction between tactile friction and the average maximum peak height of the surface features. Graphic Abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.] © 2021, The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2021
Keywords
Haptic perception, Psychophysics, Psychotribology, Tactile friction, Coatings, Resins, Surface roughness, Topography, Controlling factors, Furniture industry, Matting agents, Physical characteristics, Surface feature, Systematic variation, Tactile perception, Friction
National Category
Tribology (Interacting Surfaces including Friction, Lubrication and Wear)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-56010 (URN)10.1007/s11249-021-01485-z (DOI)2-s2.0-85112132029 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding text 1: This work is an extract from a project predominantly financed by IKEA of Sweden AB and Akzo Nobel Coatings International B.V. We extend our thanks anonymously to all of the people there who contributed with practical assistance, materials choices and supported the concept.; Funding text 2: Open access funding provided by Royal Institute of Technology. This work is an extract from a project predominantly financed by IKEA of Sweden AB and Akzo Nobel Coatings International B.V.

Available from: 2021-08-25 Created: 2021-08-25 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Skedung, L., Collier, E. S., Harris, K. L., Wallqvist, V., Nyhus, A. K. & Björndal, L. (2021). FINE-TUNING THE TACTILE PERCEPTION OF COATINGS. European Coatings Journal, 6, 32-37
Open this publication in new window or tab >>FINE-TUNING THE TACTILE PERCEPTION OF COATINGS
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2021 (English)In: European Coatings Journal, ISSN 0930-3847, Vol. 6, p. 32-37Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Human tactile evaluations were combined with tactile friction measurements to quantify the perceptual experience of touching coated panels. Monosized beads of nine different polymer compositions were added to a soft-touch waterborne two-component PUR coating. Introducing beads of different composition affected tactile perception.

National Category
Tribology (Interacting Surfaces including Friction, Lubrication and Wear)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-57519 (URN)
Available from: 2022-01-03 Created: 2022-01-03 Last updated: 2023-06-08Bibliographically approved
Skedung, L., Harris, K. L., Hörlin, E. & Rutland, M. W. (2020). The finishing touches: the role of friction and roughness in haptic perception of surface coatings.. Experimental Brain Research, 238, 1511-1524
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The finishing touches: the role of friction and roughness in haptic perception of surface coatings.
2020 (English)In: Experimental Brain Research, ISSN 0014-4819, E-ISSN 1432-1106, Vol. 238, p. 1511-1524Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Humans are extraordinarily skilled in the tactile evaluation of, and differentiation between, surfaces. The chemical and mechanical properties of these surfaces are translated into tactile signals during haptic exploration by mechanoreceptors in our skin, which are specialized to respond to different types of temporal and mechanical stimulation. Describing the effects of measurable physical characteristics on the human response to tactile exploration of surfaces is of great interest to manufacturers of household materials so that the haptic experience can be considered during design, product development and quality control. In this study, methods from psychophysics and materials science are combined to advance current understanding of which physical properties affect tactile perception of a range of furniture surfaces, i.e., foils and coatings, thus creating a tactile map of the furniture product landscape. Participants' responses in a similarity scaling task were analyzed using INDSCAL from which three haptic dimensions were identified. Results show that specific roughness parameters, tactile friction and vibrational information, as characterized by a stylus profilometer, a Forceboard, and a biomimetic synthetic finger, are important for tactile differentiation and preferences of these surface treatments. The obtained dimensions are described as distinct combinations of the surface properties characterized, rather than as 'roughness' or 'friction' independently. Preferences by touch were related to the roughness, friction and thermal properties of the surfaces. The results both complement and advance current understanding of how roughness and friction relate to tactile perception of surfaces.

Keywords
Friction, Haptic perception, Psychotribology, Roughness, Touch, Wood furniture surfaces
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-45039 (URN)10.1007/s00221-020-05831-w (DOI)32447410 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-05-29 Created: 2020-05-29 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2473-9171

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