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Publications (10 of 32) Show all publications
Kaschuk, J. J., Al Haj, Y., Valdez Garcia, J., Kamppinen, A., Rojas, O. J., Abitbol, T., . . . Vapaavuori, J. (2024). Processing factors affecting roughness, optical and mechanical properties of nanocellulose films for optoelectronics. Carbohydrate Polymers, 332, Article ID 121877.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Processing factors affecting roughness, optical and mechanical properties of nanocellulose films for optoelectronics
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2024 (English)In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 332, article id 121877Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This work aims to understand how nanocellulose (NC) processing can modify the key characteristics of NC films to align with the main requirements for high-performance optoelectronics. The performance of these devices relies heavily on the light transmittance of the substrate, which serves as a mechanical support and optimizes light interactions with the photoactive component. Critical variables that determine the optical and mechanical properties of the films include the morphology of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF), as well as the concentration and turbidity of the respective aqueous suspensions. This study demonstrates that achieving high transparency was possible by reducing the grammage and adjusting the drying temperature through hot pressing. Furthermore, the use of modified CNF, specifically carboxylated CNF, resulted in more transparent films due to a higher nanosized fraction and lower turbidity. The mechanical properties of the films depended on their structure, homogeneity (spatial uniformity of local grammage), and electrokinetic factors, such as the presence of electrostatic charges on CNF. Additionally, we investigated the angle-dependent transmittance of the CNF films, since solar devices usually operate under indirect light. This work demonstrates the importance of a systematic approach to the optimization of cellulose films, providing valuable insight into the optoelectronic field. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2024
Keywords
Biobased substrates, Light management, Optoelectronic, Solar cells, Sustainable electronics, Anatomy, Basis Weight, Electrostatics, Hot Pressing, Turbidity, Cellulose films, Morphology, Nanocellulose, Nanofibers, Suspensions (fluids), Bio-based, Biobased substrate, Cellulose nanofibrils, Grammage, Nanocellulose films, Optical and mechanical properties, Performance, Processing factors, Substrates
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-71940 (URN)10.1016/j.carbpol.2024.121877 (DOI)2-s2.0-85184152262 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, European Research CouncilSwedish Research Council Formas, 318890, 318891Academy of Finland, 334818EU, Horizon 2020, 788489
Note

This work was a part of the Academy of Finland 's Flagship Programme under Projects No. 318890 and 318891 (Competence Center for Materials Bioeconomy, FinnCERES). J.V. acknowledges the Academy of Finland project “SUBSTAINABLE” (Decision number 334818 ) for generous funding. T.A. acknowledges funding from Formas for the “SUBSTAINABLE” project granted through the Tandem Forest Values program (Formas grant number 2019–02508 ). J. V. G acknowledges funding from Academy of Finland (Bio-EST, 336441 ) and Finnish Cultural Foundation . A. K. acknowledges funding from: UTUGS graduate school. K. M. acknowledges the Academy of Finland project Bio-EST, 336577 . O.J.R. and J.J.K. acknowledge funding support from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program (grant agreement No 788489 , “BioElCell”)

Available from: 2024-02-27 Created: 2024-02-27 Last updated: 2024-02-27Bibliographically approved
Sudheshwar, A., Beni, V., Malinverno, N., Hischier, R., Nevo, Y., Dhuiège, B., . . . Som, C. (2023). Assessing sustainability hotspots in the production of paper-based printed electronics. Flexible and Printed Electronics, 8(1), Article ID 015002.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing sustainability hotspots in the production of paper-based printed electronics
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2023 (English)In: Flexible and Printed Electronics, ISSN 2058-8585, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 015002Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Novel printed electronics are projected to grow and be manufactured in the future in large volumes. In many applications, printed electronics are envisaged as sustainable alternatives to conventional (PCB-based) electronics. One such application is in the semi-quantitative drug detection and point-of-care device called ‘GREENSENSE’ that uses paper-based printed electronics. This paper analyses the carbon footprint of GREENSENSE in order to identify and suggest means of mitigating disproportionately high environmental impacts, labeled ‘sustainability hotspots’, from materials and processes used during production which would be relevant in high-volume applications. Firstly, a life cycle model traces the flow of raw materials (such as paper, CNCs, and nanosilver) through the three ‘umbrella’ processes (circuit printing, component mounting, and biofunctionalization) manufacturing different electronic components (the substrate, conductive inks, energy sources, display, etc) that are further assembled into GREENSENSE. Based on the life cycle model, life cycle inventories are modeled that map out the network of material and energy flow throughout the production of GREENSENSE. Finally, from the environmental impact and sustainability hotspot analysis, both crystalline nanocellulose and nanosilver were found to create material hotspots and they should be replaced in favor of lower-impact materials. Process hotspots are created by manual, lab-, and pilot-scale processes with unoptimized material consumption, energy use, and waste generation; automated and industrial-scale manufacturing can mitigate such process hotspots. © 2023 The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Physics, 2023
Keywords
carbon footprint, life cycle assessment, printed electronics, sustainability hotspots, Environmental impact, Life cycle, Substrates, Sustainable development, Drug detection, Hotspots, Large volumes, Life cycle model, Nano silver, PCB-based, Point of care, Sustainability hotspot, Electronics, Energy, Paper, Production, Raw Materials
National Category
Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-63978 (URN)10.1088/2058-8585/acacab (DOI)2-s2.0-85146865282 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding details: Horizon 2020 Framework Programme, H2020, 761000; Funding text 1: This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under Grant Agreement No. 761000 GREENSENSE.

Available from: 2023-02-16 Created: 2023-02-16 Last updated: 2023-12-06Bibliographically approved
Kotov, N., Larsson, P. A., Jain, K., Abitbol, T., Cernescu, A., Wågberg, L. & Johnson, C. M. (2023). Elucidating the fine-scale structural morphology of nanocellulose by nano infrared spectroscopy. Carbohydrate Polymers, 302, Article ID 120320.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elucidating the fine-scale structural morphology of nanocellulose by nano infrared spectroscopy
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2023 (English)In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 302, article id 120320Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nanoscale infrared (IR) spectroscopy and microscopy, enabling the acquisition of IR spectra and images with a lateral resolution of 20 nm, is employed to chemically characterize individual cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) to elucidate if the CNCs and CNFs consist of alternating crystalline and amorphous domains along the CNF/CNC. The high lateral resolution enables studies of the nanoscale morphology at different domains of the CNFs/CNCs: flat segments, kinks, twisted areas, and end points. The types of nanocellulose investigated are CNFs from tunicate, CNCs from cotton, and anionic and cationic wood-derived CNFs. All nano-FTIR spectra acquired from the different samples and different domains of the individual nanocellulose particles resemble a spectrum of crystalline cellulose, suggesting that the non-crystalline cellulose signal observed in macroscopic measurements of nanocellulose most likely originate from cellulose chains present at the surface of the nanocellulose particles. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2023
Keywords
Cellulose nanocrystals, Cellulose nanofibrils, Crystalline and amorphous domains, Nano-FTIR spectroscopy, Nanocellulose, S-SNOM, Cellulose derivatives, Morphology, Nanocrystals, Nanofibers, Wood, Crystalline and amorphous domain, Crystalline cellulose, Different domains, FTIR spectroscopy, Infrared: spectroscopy, Nano-cellulose, Spectra's, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy
National Category
Bio Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-61348 (URN)10.1016/j.carbpol.2022.120320 (DOI)2-s2.0-85142692194 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding details: 188-0175, 2017/88 (180, 985/19; Funding text 1: This work was supported by a grant from Olle Engkvists stiftelse ( 2017/88 (180) ) that financed the purchase of the nano-FTIR instrument, a scholarship from Olle Engkvists stiftelse ( 188-0175 ) finances the postdoctoral studies of N.K., and a grant from Troedsson-fonden ( 985/19 ) partly finances C.M.J., P.L., and N.K..

Available from: 2022-12-09 Created: 2022-12-09 Last updated: 2022-12-09Bibliographically approved
Abitbol, T., Kubat, M., Brännvall, E., Kotov, N., Johnson, C. M., Nizamov, R., . . . Guerreiro, M. P. (2023). Isolation of Mixed Compositions of Cellulose Nanocrystals, Microcrystalline Cellulose, and Lignin Nanoparticles from Wood Pulps. ACS Omega, 8(24), 21474-21484
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Isolation of Mixed Compositions of Cellulose Nanocrystals, Microcrystalline Cellulose, and Lignin Nanoparticles from Wood Pulps
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2023 (English)In: ACS Omega, E-ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 8, no 24, p. 21474-21484Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

From a circular economy perspective, one-pot strategies for the isolation of cellulose nanomaterials at a high yield and with multifunctional properties are attractive. Here, the effects of lignin content (bleached vs unbleached softwood kraft pulp) and sulfuric acid concentration on the properties of crystalline lignocellulose isolates and their films are explored. Hydrolysis at 58 wt % sulfuric acid resulted in both cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and microcrystalline cellulose at a relatively high yield (>55%), whereas hydrolysis at 64 wt % gave CNCs at a lower yield (<20%). CNCs from 58 wt % hydrolysis were more polydisperse and had a higher average aspect ratio (1.5-2×), a lower surface charge (2×), and a higher shear viscosity (100-1000×). Hydrolysis of unbleached pulp additionally yielded spherical nanoparticles (NPs) that were <50 nm in diameter and identified as lignin by nanoscale Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and IR imaging. Chiral nematic self-organization was observed in films from CNCs isolated at 64 wt % but not from the more heterogeneous CNC qualities produced at 58 wt %. All films degraded to some extent under simulated sunlight trials, but these effects were less pronounced in lignin-NP-containing films, suggesting a protective feature, but the hemicellulose content and CNC crystallinity may be implicated as well. Finally, heterogeneous CNC compositions obtained at a high yield and with improved resource efficiency are suggested for specific nanocellulose uses, for instance, as thickeners or reinforcing fillers, representing a step toward the development of application-tailored CNC grades. © 2023 The Authors. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society, 2023
National Category
Biochemicals
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-65709 (URN)10.1021/acsomega.3c00295 (DOI)2-s2.0-85162876606 (Scopus ID)
Note

This research was funded by the RISE RP18 Nanocellulose Research Program, the RISE Nanocellulose Competence Platform, and the Tandem Forest Values Program “SUBSTAINABLE” project (Formas grant number 2019-02508).

Available from: 2023-08-09 Created: 2023-08-09 Last updated: 2024-03-13Bibliographically approved
Wojno, S., Ahlinder, A., Altskär, A., Stading, M., Abitbol, T. & Kádár, R. (2023). Percolation and phase behavior in cellulose nanocrystal suspensions from nonlinear rheological analysis. Carbohydrate Polymers, 308, Article ID 120622.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Percolation and phase behavior in cellulose nanocrystal suspensions from nonlinear rheological analysis
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2023 (English)In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 308, article id 120622Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We examine the influence of surface charge on the percolation, gel-point and phase behavior of cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) suspensions in relation to their nonlinear rheological material response. Desulfation decreases CNC surface charge density which leads to an increase in attractive forces between CNCs. Therefore, by considering sulfated and desulfated CNC suspensions, we are comparing CNC systems that differ in their percolation and gel-point concentrations relative to their phase transition concentrations. The results show that independently of whether the gel-point (linear viscoelasticity, LVE) occurs at the biphasic - liquid crystalline transition (sulfated CNC) or at the isotropic - quasi-biphasic transition (desulfated CNC), the nonlinear behavior appears to mark the existence of a weakly percolated network at lower concentrations. Above this percolation threshold, nonlinear material parameters are sensitive to the phase and gelation behavior as determined in static (phase) and LVE conditions (gel-point). However, the change in material response in nonlinear conditions can occur at higher concentrations than identified through polarized optical microscopy, suggesting that the nonlinear deformations could distort the suspensions microstructure such that for example a liquid crystalline phase (static) suspension could show microstructural dynamics similar to a biphasic system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2023
Keywords
Cellulose nanocrystal suspensions, Fourier-transform rheology, Percolation, Self-assembly phases, Stress decomposition, Cellulose, Cellulose derivatives, Gelation, Nanocrystals, Nonlinear optics, Solvents, Suspensions (fluids), Cellulose nanocrystal suspension, Gel phasis, Gel point, Linear viscoelasticity, Material response, Rheological analysis, Self-assembly phase, Stress decompositions, Self assembly, Behavior, Dispersions, Phase Transition
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-64094 (URN)10.1016/j.carbpol.2023.120622 (DOI)2-s2.0-85147603169 (Scopus ID)
Note

Correspondence Address: Abitbol T, RISE, Sweden;  Funding details: BASF; Funding details: Wallenberg Wood Science Center, WWSC; Funding text 1: SW and RK are grateful for the financial support of the Wallenberg Wood Science Centre (WWSC) and of the Chalmers Area of Advance Materials Science. The Chair of Sustainable Packaging within the Institute of Materials at EPFL, co-funded by BASF, Logitech, Nestlé and SIG, is acknowledged by TA. A.Ah, A.A. and M.S. are grateful for the financial support from KP Nanocellulose platform at RISE AB.; Funding text 2: SW and RK are grateful for the financial support of the Wallenberg Wood Science Centre (WWSC) and of the Chalmers Area of Advance Materials Science. The Chair of Sustainable Packaging within the Institute of Materials at EPFL, co-funded by BASF, Logitech, Nestlé and SIG, is acknowledged by TA. A.Ah, A.A. and M.S. are grateful for the financial support from KP Nanocellulose platform at RISE AB.

Available from: 2023-02-28 Created: 2023-02-28 Last updated: 2023-10-06Bibliographically approved
Moon, R. J., Hensdal, C. L., Beck, S., Fall, A., Costa, J., Kojima, E., . . . Batchelor, W. (2023). Setting priorities in CNF particle size measurement: What is needed vs. what is feasible. TAPPI Journal, 22(2), 116-137
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Setting priorities in CNF particle size measurement: What is needed vs. what is feasible
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2023 (English)In: TAPPI Journal, ISSN 0734-1415, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 116-137Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Measuring the size of cellulose nanomaterials can be challenging, especially in the case of branched and entangled cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs). The International Organization for Standardization, Technical Committee 6, Task Group 1—Cellulosic Nanomaterials, is exploring opportunities to develop standard methods for the measurement of CNF particle size and particle size distribution. This paper presents a summary of the available measuring techniques, responses from a survey on the measurement needs of CNF companies and researchers, and outcomes from an international workshop on cellulose nanofibril measurement and standardization. Standardization needs differed among groups, with Japanese companies mostly requiring measurements for product specification and production control, and other companies mostly needing measurements for safety/regula-tory purposes and for grade definitions in patents. Among all the companies, average length and width with percen-tiles (D(10), D(50), D(90)) were the most desired measurands. Workshop participants concurred that defining the location(s) on the CNF at which to measure the width and the length is an urgent and complex question. They also agreed that methods are needed for rapid particle size measurement at the nanoscale. Our recommendation within ISO is to start work to revise the definition of CNFs and develop sample preparation and measurement guidelines. It was also recommended that further research be done to reproducibly prepare hierarchical branched CNF structures and characterize them, develop automated image analysis for hierarchical branched CNF structures, and develop a classification system encompassing measurements at multiple size ranges from micro-to nanoscale to fully characterize and distinguish CNF samples. 00327-2022 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Technical Assoc. of the Pulp and Paper Industry Press, 2023
Keywords
Cellulose, Nanofibers, Particle size, Production control, Standardization, Cellulose nanofibrils, International organization for standardizations, Measurements of, Measuring technique, Nano scale, Particle size measurement, Particles sizes, Particles-size distributions, Task groups, Technical committees, Particle size analysis, ISO, Measurement, Standards, Structures
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-64329 (URN)10.32964/TJ22.2.116 (DOI)2-s2.0-85150051138 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-05 Created: 2023-05-05 Last updated: 2023-12-06Bibliographically approved
Koppolu, R., Lahti, J., Abitbol, T., Aulin, C., Kuusipalo, J. & Toivakka, M. (2023). Tailoring the performance of nanocellulose-based multilayer-barrier paperboard using biodegradable-thermoplastics, pigments, and plasticizers. Cellulose, 30(11), 6945
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tailoring the performance of nanocellulose-based multilayer-barrier paperboard using biodegradable-thermoplastics, pigments, and plasticizers
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2023 (English)In: Cellulose, ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 30, no 11, p. 6945-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this work a multilayer barrier paperboard was produced in a roll-to-roll process by slot-die coating of nanocellulose (microfibrillated cellulose or carboxymethylated cellulose nanofibrils) followed by extrusion coating of biodegradable thermoplastics (polylactic acid, polybutylene adipate terephthalate and polybutylene succinate). Hyperplaty kaolin pigments were blended in different ratios into nanocellulose to tailor the barrier properties of the multilayer structure and to study their influence on adhesion to the thermoplastic top layer. Influence of a plasticizer (glycerol) on flexibility and barrier performance of the multilayer structure was also examined. Water vapor permeance for the multilayer paperboard was below that of control single-layer thermoplastic materials, and oxygen permeance of the coated structure was similar or lower than that of pure nanocellulose films. Glycerol as a plasticizer further lowered the oxygen permeance and kaolin addition improved the adhesion at the nanocellulose/thermoplastic interface. The results provide insight into the role played by nanocelluloses, thermoplastics, pigments, and plasticizers on the barrier properties when these elements are processed together into multilayer structures, and paves the way for industrial production of sustainable packaging. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Science and Business Media B.V., 2023
Keywords
Barrier, Biodegradable, Multilayer, Nanocellulose, Packaging, Roll-to-roll, Adhesion, Biodegradable polymers, Glycerol, Kaolin, Multilayer films, Multilayers, Oxygen, Reinforced plastics, Solvents, Barrier properties, Biodegradable thermoplastics, Multilayer barriers, Multilayer structures, Nano-cellulose, Performance, Roll to Roll, Roll-to-roll process, Plasticizers
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-65544 (URN)10.1007/s10570-023-05281-x (DOI)2-s2.0-85161525316 (Scopus ID)
Note

RK received funding from Åbo Akademi Graduate School of Chemical Engineering, Magnus Ehrnrooth foundation, Finnish Forest Products Engineers Association, and Walter Ahlström Foundation.

Available from: 2023-06-28 Created: 2023-06-28 Last updated: 2024-06-07Bibliographically approved
Ul Hassan Alvi, N., Mulla, Y., Abitbol, T., Fall, A. & Beni, V. (2023). The Fast and One-Step Growth of ZnO Nanorods on Cellulose Nanofibers for Highly Sensitive Photosensors. Nanomaterials, 13(18), Article ID 2611.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Fast and One-Step Growth of ZnO Nanorods on Cellulose Nanofibers for Highly Sensitive Photosensors
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2023 (English)In: Nanomaterials, E-ISSN 2079-4991, Vol. 13, no 18, article id 2611Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cellulose is the most abundant organic material on our planet which has a key role in our daily life (e.g., paper, packaging). In recent years, the need for replacing fossil-based materials has expanded the application of cellulose and cellulose derivatives including into electronics and sensing. The combination of nanostructures with cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) is expected to create new opportunities for the development of innovative electronic devices. In this paper, we report on a single-step process for the low temperature (<100 °C), environmentally friendly, and fully scalable CNF-templated highly dense growth of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs). More specifically, the effect of the degree of substitution of the CNF (enzymatic CNFs and carboxymethylated CNFs with two different substitution levels) on the ZnO growth and the application of the developed ZnO NRs/CNF nanocomposites in the development of UV sensors is reported herein. The results of this investigation show that the growth and nature of ZnO NRs are strongly dependent on the charge of the CNFs; high charge promotes nanorod growth whereas with low charge, ZnO isotropic microstructures are created that are not attached to the CNFs. Devices manufactured via screen printing/drop-casting of the ZnO NRs/CNF nanocomposites demonstrate a good photo-sensing response with a very stable UV-induced photocurrent of 25.84 µA. This also exhibits excellent long-term stability with fast ON/OFF switching performance under the irradiance of a UV lamp (15 W). 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI), 2023
National Category
Condensed Matter Physics Materials Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-67710 (URN)10.3390/nano13182611 (DOI)2-s2.0-85172775433 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 761000Vinnova, 2016–05193
Note

The authors would like to acknowledge the Linköping University for the access to its laboratory facilities. The authors would like to acknowledge funding from Vinnova (Digital Cellulose Competence Center, Diary number 2016–05193) and the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program (GREENSENSE, Grant Agreement No. 761000). Niklas Nordgren is acknowledged for the capturing the nice AFM images.

Available from: 2023-11-06 Created: 2023-11-06 Last updated: 2023-12-06Bibliographically approved
Köhnlein, M., Abitbol, T., Osório Oliveira, A., Magnusson, M., Adolfsson, K., Svensson, S., . . . Zamani, A. (2022). Bioconversion of food waste to biocompatible wet-laid fungal films. Materials & design, 216, Article ID 110534.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bioconversion of food waste to biocompatible wet-laid fungal films
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2022 (English)In: Materials & design, ISSN 0264-1275, E-ISSN 1873-4197, Vol. 216, article id 110534Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The fungus Rhizopus delemar was grown on bread waste in a submerged cultivation process and wet-laid into films. Alkali or enzyme treatments were used to isolate the fungal cell wall. A heat treatment was also applied to deactivate biological activity of the fungus. Homogenization of fungal biomass was done by an iterative ultrafine grinding process. Finally, the biomass was cast into films by a wet-laid process. Ultrafine grinding resulted in densification of the films. Fungal films showed tensile strengths of up to 18.1 MPa, a Young's modulus of 2.3 GPa and a strain at break of 1.4%. Highest tensile strength was achieved using alkali treatment, with SEM analysis showing a dense and highly organized structure. In contrast, less organized structures were obtained using enzymatic or heat treatments. A cell viability assay and fluorescent staining confirmed the biocompatibility of the films. A promising route for food waste valorization to sustainable fungal wet-laid films was established. © 2022 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2022
Keywords
Biocompatible, Filamentous fungi, Food waste, Ultrafine grinding, Wet-laid film, Zygomycetes, Bioactivity, Elastic moduli, Fungi, Grinding (machining), Heat treatment, Tensile strength, Alkali treatment, Cultivation process, Filamentous fungus, Organized structure, Rhizopus delemar, Submerged cultivation, Ultra-fine grinding, Biocompatibility
National Category
Other Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-58887 (URN)10.1016/j.matdes.2022.110534 (DOI)2-s2.0-85126375844 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: VINNOVA, 2018-04093; Funding text 1: This work was supported by Vinnova, Sweden through the project Sustainable Fungal Textiles: A novel approach for reuse of food waste [Reference number: 2018-04093].

Available from: 2022-03-30 Created: 2022-03-30 Last updated: 2022-03-30Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, P., Engström, Å., Kaschuk, J. J., Vapaavuori, J., Larsson, A. & Abitbol, T. (2022). Design of experiments to investigate multi-additive cellulose nanocrystal films. Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences, 9, Article ID 988600.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design of experiments to investigate multi-additive cellulose nanocrystal films
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2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences, E-ISSN 2296-889X, Vol. 9, article id 988600Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) suspensions can self-assemble into chiral nematic films upon the slow evaporation of water. These films are brittle, as indicated by their fracturing instead of plastically deforming once they are fully elastically deformed. This aspect can be mediated to some extent by plasticizing additives, such as glucose and glycerol, however, few reports consider more than one additive at a time or address the influence of additive content on the homogeneity of the self-assembled structure. In this work, design of experiments (DoE) was used to empirically model complex film compositions, attempting to relate additive concentrations in dilute suspension to film properties, and to understand whether outcome specific predictions are possible using this approach. We demonstrate that DoE can be used to predict film properties in multi-additive systems, without consideration given to the different phenomena that occur along the drying process or to the nature of the additives. Additionally, a homogeneity metric is introduced in relation to chiral nematic organization in CNC films, with most of the additive-containing compositions in this work found to reduce the homogeneity of the self-assembly relative to pure CNC films. Copyright © 2022 Nilsson, Engström, Kaschuk, Vapaavuori, Larsson and Abitbol.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2022
Keywords
additives, cellulose nanocrystals, design of experiments, films, machine learning, self-assembly
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-61374 (URN)10.3389/fmolb.2022.988600 (DOI)2-s2.0-85142160702 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: BASF; Funding text 1: Elizabeth Hörlin is acknowledged for guidance and help with practical implementation of design of experiments, Niklas Nordgren for AFM imaging and analysis, Karin Hallstensson for SEM imaging, and Erik Mellberg for useful discussions. TA acknowledges the Chair in Sustainable Packaging at EPFL, co-funded by BASF, Logitech, Nestlé, and SIG.

Available from: 2022-12-08 Created: 2022-12-08 Last updated: 2022-12-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9782-3860

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