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Mendibide, ChristopheORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5399-9274
Publications (10 of 18) Show all publications
Mendibide, C., Vucko, F., Martinez, M., Joshi, G. & Kittel, J. (2024). Effect of degraded environmental conditions on the service behavior of a X65 pipeline steel not designed for hydrogen transport. International journal of hydrogen energy, 52, 1019
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of degraded environmental conditions on the service behavior of a X65 pipeline steel not designed for hydrogen transport
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2024 (English)In: International journal of hydrogen energy, ISSN 0360-3199, E-ISSN 1879-3487, Vol. 52, p. 1019-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

With the international drive to deploy green energies and decarbonized intermediates in the place of fossil fuel sources, a large number of developed countries are actively preparing for a future where hydrogen plays a strategic role as an energy storage medium. Producing and using hydrogen requires the rapid expansion of a dedicated, economically viable industrial sector. Nevertheless, questions on how to safely store, transport and distribute hydrogen remain an important priority today. In countries with existing natural gas transport grids, the possibility to retrofit these networks to store and transport hydrogen-natural gas blends is being studied. A key challenge is to evaluate how pressurized H2 would interact with steel structures with regards structural embrittlement of the latter, with a view to exploiting existing transport infrastructures for storage and transport applications. In this work, we evaluate the H2-performance of a non-hydrogen service ×65 pipeline steel. The cracking susceptibility of this steel grade has been evaluated at 100 bar H2 using slow strain rate testing, Constant strain testing and fracture toughness measurements. Accompanying hydrogen permeation tests under pressure provide diffusion data and elucidate the discussion. Exposures were carried out in dry or wet H2 and with or without H2S contamination at levels representative of biogas. The results underline that the impact of dry or wet hydrogen on this grade are moderate. The presence of traces of H2S together with humidity could risk seriously degrading the mechanical performance of the ×65 steel grade. © 2023 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2024
Keywords
Fracture toughness, Hydrogen induced cracking, Hydrogen permeation, Hydrogen transport, Pipeline, Slow strain rate test, Cracks, Digital storage, Ductile fracture, Fossil fuels, Fracture testing, Hydrogen, Hydrogen embrittlement, Natural gas, Steel pipe, Strain rate, 'Dry' [, Environmental conditions, Green energy, Service behaviors, Slow strain rate tests, Steel grades, X65 pipe-line steel, Pipelines
National Category
Corrosion Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-65558 (URN)10.1016/j.ijhydene.2023.05.309 (DOI)2-s2.0-85162176430 (Scopus ID)
Note

Correspondence Address: C. Mendibide; Institut de La Corrosion (French Corrosion Institute), Part of RISE - ZA Du Parc, Fraisses, Secteur Gampille, F-42490, France;   

Available from: 2023-06-30 Created: 2023-06-30 Last updated: 2024-06-07Bibliographically approved
Bulidon, N., Pélissier, K., Boissy, C., Mendibide, C., Maillot, V., Bourbon, X. & Crusset, D. (2023). Hydrogen production through aluminium corrosion in a cement-based matrix. Materials and corrosion - Werkstoffe und Korrosion, 74(11-12), 1765-1776
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hydrogen production through aluminium corrosion in a cement-based matrix
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2023 (English)In: Materials and corrosion - Werkstoffe und Korrosion, ISSN 0947-5117, E-ISSN 1521-4176, Vol. 74, no 11-12, p. 1765-1776Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In France, deep geological disposal is considered for the storage of high and intermediate-level long-lived radioactive wastes. For aluminium, the possibility to encapsulate the wastes in a cement-based matrix is studied. However, cement being an alkaline environment, aluminium can lose its passivity, starts to corrode leading to hydrogen evolution in the infrastructures and generate a possible explosive hazard after decades of storage if hydrogen can accumulate somewhere in the facility. It is therefore necessary to study the corrosion behaviour of aluminium in the different cements considered for the encapsulation to estimate the possible amount of hydrogen that could be generated through corrosion and design the cement capsules accordingly. This work mainly focused on the reaction occurring at the aluminium-cement interface. Raman spectroscopy did not highlight significant differences in the nature of the corrosion products forming at the cement/aluminium interface, leading to the conclusion that it is not the chemistry of the cement that is the key factor controlling the corrosion rate but rather the physical properties of the cement matrix. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley and Sons Inc, 2023
Keywords
Alkalinity; Aluminum corrosion; Cements; Corrosion rate; Corrosive effects; Electrochemical corrosion; Hydrogen storage; Radioactive wastes; Alkaline environment; Aluminum can; Cement encapsulation; Cement-based matrices; Corrosion products; Deep geological disposal; Electrochemical measurements; Hydrogen-evolution; Long-lived radioactive wastes; Nuclear waste disposal; Hydrogen production
National Category
Corrosion Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-67964 (URN)10.1002/maco.202313962 (DOI)2-s2.0-85171655991 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-24 Created: 2023-11-24 Last updated: 2023-12-28Bibliographically approved
Mendibide, C. & Dessolin, C. (2023). Selective Dissolution Forming on Duplex Stainless Steels during Sour Testing. Is it a Pass or a Fail?. Corrosion, 79(2), 174-192
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Selective Dissolution Forming on Duplex Stainless Steels during Sour Testing. Is it a Pass or a Fail?
2023 (English)In: Corrosion, ISSN 0010-9312, E-ISSN 1938-159X, Vol. 79, no 2, p. 174-192Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, the effect of test conditions on the formation of selective dissolution during sour testing was investigated on a cold-rolled duplex stainless steel UNS S32750. All experiments were conducted in NaCl 150 g/L and pH2S = 0.3 bar. Different pHs between 3.3 and 4.5 were studied at 80°C. Based on tests performed under varying conditions, it is demonstrated that selective dissolution (SD) competes with cracking and that under conditions leading to the formation of a large area with SD, the presence of this type of corrosion can hide the susceptibility of the material to cracking. The presence of only SD after testing must therefore be considered with caution. SD initiated also without applied stress showing that the phenomenon is correlated to a loss of passivity. From electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analyses and electrochemical monitoring the formation of SD under the test conditions considered in this work is correlated to the instability of the passive film and not to any superficial singularities of the material or specific crystallographic orientations. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NACE International, 2023
Keywords
Cracking, Duplex stainless steel, H2S, Selective dissolution, Cold rolling, Dissolution, Metal cladding, Stainless steel, Steel corrosion, Steel sheet, Steel testing, Applied stress, Cold-rolled, Condition, Crystallographic orientations, Electrochemical monitoring, Electron backscattered diffraction analysis, Passive films, Test condition, Types of corrosions, Sodium chloride
National Category
Corrosion Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-64412 (URN)10.5006/4225 (DOI)2-s2.0-85153050436 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Correspondence Address: Mendibide C, RISE - Institut de la Corrosion, France

Available from: 2023-05-03 Created: 2023-05-03 Last updated: 2023-05-03Bibliographically approved
Mendibide, C., Dusquesnes, V., Deydier, V., Bourbon, X. & Crusset, D. (2021). Corrosion behavior of aluminum alloy 5754 in cement-based matrix-simulating nuclear waste disposal conditions. Materials and corrosion - Werkstoffe und Korrosion, 72(1-2), 383-395
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Corrosion behavior of aluminum alloy 5754 in cement-based matrix-simulating nuclear waste disposal conditions
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2021 (English)In: Materials and corrosion - Werkstoffe und Korrosion, ISSN 0947-5117, E-ISSN 1521-4176, Vol. 72, no 1-2, p. 383-395Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Depending on the lifetime and level of radioactivity of radioactive wastes, different disposal facilities are considered. Though low- and intermediate-level short-lived waste can be disposed in surface disposal facilities, deep geological disposal is considered for high- and intermediate-level long-lived waste. In France and Belgium, long-term disposal is studied in clay host rock media. For aluminum, the disposal concept is based on encapsulation of the waste in a cement-based matrix. It is also well-known that aluminum is prone to severe corrosion in sufficiently alkaline environments leading to possible hydrogen production. To ensure the safety of the disposal facilities and the integrity of the cement capsules, the amount of aluminum that is disposed in each waste package must be specified and is limited to mitigate the level of hydrogen production by aluminum corrosion. In the present study, the corrosion resistance of an aluminum alloy (grade EN-AW-5754/H111) in two different cement matrices was studied in different configurations at room temperature. In each case, the evolution of hydrogen production was monitored to address the corrosion rate variation versus time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlag, 2021
Keywords
aluminum, cement encapsulation, hydrogen evolution, nuclear waste management, resaturation, Aluminum corrosion, Cement industry, Cements, Corrosion rate, Corrosion resistance, Corrosion resistant alloys, Corrosive effects, Hydrogen production, Radioactive waste disposal, Radioactive wastes, Radioactivity, Alkaline environment, Cement-based matrices, Corrosion behavior, Deep geological disposal, Disposal facilities, Evolution of hydrogens, Nuclear waste dis-posal, Surface disposal facility, Aluminum alloys
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-46359 (URN)10.1002/maco.202011687 (DOI)2-s2.0-85088660329 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-08-19 Created: 2020-08-19 Last updated: 2022-01-20Bibliographically approved
Larché, N., Emo, B., Thierry, D., Duquesnes, V. & Mendibide, C. (2021). Localized corrosion of lean duplex stainless steels in H2S-containing wet atmosphere from urban wastewater treatment units. Materials and corrosion - Werkstoffe und Korrosion (11), 1730
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Localized corrosion of lean duplex stainless steels in H2S-containing wet atmosphere from urban wastewater treatment units
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2021 (English)In: Materials and corrosion - Werkstoffe und Korrosion, ISSN 0947-5117, E-ISSN 1521-4176, no 11, p. 1730-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

With lower alloying costs and higher mechanical properties, lean duplex stainless steels can be a good alternative to the more commonly used austenitic stainless steels. A study was initiated to define the limits of the use of lean duplex stainless steels for urban wastewater treatment (WWT) units. This paper gives and discusses the corrosion results in an aerated wet atmosphere containing H2S at different levels. Exposures were performed both at laboratory scale and in the field WWT plant for 1 year. A specific probe was also designed to study the corrosion process below water condensate film contaminated with H2S. Under such conditions, the properties of stainless steel were strongly modified with an enhanced risk of localized corrosion. The results obtained on lean duplex materials (UNS S32101, S32202, and S32304) are compared with austenitic UNS S30403 and UNS S31603 and with the more standard duplexes UNS S82441 and UNS S32205. The results show that lean duplexes can be used in aerated wet atmospheres in case of moderate contamination of H2S (<10 ppm) and chloride (<200 ppm). For higher contaminations (e.g., H2S around 100 ppm/chloride around 1000 ppm) the duplex S32205 should be preferred.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley and Sons Inc, 2021
Keywords
H2S, lean duplex, localized corrosion, stainless steels, wastewater, wet corrosion, Atmospheric corrosion, Austenite, Chlorine compounds, Hydrogen sulfide, Hydrogen sulfide removal (water treatment), Steel corrosion, Wastewater treatment, Alloying costs, Austenitic, Condensate films, Corrosion process, Lean duplex stainless steel, Lean duplexes, Duplex stainless steel
National Category
Metallurgy and Metallic Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-54688 (URN)10.1002/maco.202112508 (DOI)2-s2.0-85107825521 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Research Fund for Coal and Steel, RFCS, 749632; Funding text 1: Stéphane Deleris, David Lahache, Jean Francois Mougel, and Catalin Biscu are acknowledged for their help in field exposures in Brussels. Veronique Hocquet, Olivier Colombero, and Paul Sacristan are acknowledged for their help in field exposures in Cap Sicié. This study shows part of the results from a European project supported by the Research Fund for Coal and Steel (RFCS), under the Grant Agreement Number 749632 (2017–2020).

Available from: 2021-06-28 Created: 2021-06-28 Last updated: 2023-05-26Bibliographically approved
Bulidon, N., Deydier, V., Bumbieler, F., Duret-Thual, C., Mendibide, C. & Crusset, D. (2021). Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of P285NH and API 5L X65 steel grades in the high-level radioactive waste repository cell concept. Materials and corrosion - Werkstoffe und Korrosion (1-2), 154-165
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of P285NH and API 5L X65 steel grades in the high-level radioactive waste repository cell concept
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2021 (English)In: Materials and corrosion - Werkstoffe und Korrosion, ISSN 0947-5117, E-ISSN 1521-4176, no 1-2, p. 154-165Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Since 2014, the concept developed for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in the French deep geological repository project Cigéo includes a cement-based grout material. This cement-based grout material will be injected between the casing and the claystone to neutralize the potential acidity resulting from the claystone oxidation induced by the drilling process of the disposal cell. In these conditions of pH (around 10.5) and temperature (90°C, maximum expected during the disposal), the metallic materials could be sensitive to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). In this project, different environments (aerated or deaerated, at room temperature or at 90°C) and synthetic solutions are considered to reproduce the different periods expected during the long life repository. The project is based on electrochemical measurements (polarization curves to define the SCC critical domain of potentials), slow strain rate tensile tests, and long-term immersion for crack initiation and propagation tests.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlag, 2021
Keywords
geological repository, radioactive waste, stress corrosion cracking, Cements, Cracks, Geological repositories, Grouting, Mortar, Radioactive waste disposal, Radioactive waste storage, Radioactive wastes, Radioactivity, Residual stresses, Steel corrosion, Strain rate, Tensile testing, Crack initiation and propagation, Deep geological repository, Electrochemical measurements, High level radioactive waste repositories, High level radioactive wastes, Long-term immersions, Slow strain rate tensile test, Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-50118 (URN)10.1002/maco.202011842 (DOI)2-s2.0-85091488389 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-11-04 Created: 2020-11-04 Last updated: 2023-05-26Bibliographically approved
Trillo, E., Duret-Thual, C., Thierry, D., Mendibide, C., Salvatori, I., Alleva, L. & Martin, J. W. (2019). Assessment of the hydrogen induced stress cracking resistance of precipitation hardened nickel-based alloys using the slow strain rate tensile test method - Experimental parameters and related issues. In: NACE - International Corrosion Conference SeriesVolume 2019-March, 2019, Nashville; United States; 24 March 2019 through 28 March 2019;: . Paper presented at NACE - International Corrosion Conference Series 24 March 2019 through 28 March 2019. National Assoc. of Corrosion Engineers International
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of the hydrogen induced stress cracking resistance of precipitation hardened nickel-based alloys using the slow strain rate tensile test method - Experimental parameters and related issues
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2019 (English)In: NACE - International Corrosion Conference SeriesVolume 2019-March, 2019, Nashville; United States; 24 March 2019 through 28 March 2019;, National Assoc. of Corrosion Engineers International , 2019Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Within the framework of a Joint Industrial Project (JIP) sponsored by several petroleum companies, the behavior of several Precipitation Hardened (PH) Ni-based alloys with respect to Hydrogen Induced Stress Cracking (HISC) resistance was studied using the Slow Strain Rate Tensile (SSRT) test method under hydrogen charging conditions. The experimental conditions included a 0.5M sulfuric acid solution at 5 mA/cm2 and at 40°C at a strain rate of 10-6 sec-1. A round robin was performed that highlighted the need to measure the effective strain rate of the specimen during the elastic part of the SSRT test, the cell configuration, the current density, the gas cap composition, were all studied to determine the effects on the results. Once the test conditions had been optimized, the study of different industrial heats was carried out on specimens sampled in three locations, 120 degrees apart and at mid radius. It was found that sampling different areas could lead to changes in the test results, resulting mainly from microstructural variances at different locations of the bar. The results generated in this program could then be studied by relating plastic elongation obtained under CP as well as cracking mode and microstructure compliance with the API 6A CRA standard.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
National Assoc. of Corrosion Engineers International, 2019
Keywords
HISC, Precipitation Hardened Ni-based alloys, SSRT, Density of gases, Hardening, Hydrogen, Metal testing, Nickel alloys, Petroleum industry, Precipitation (chemical), Regulatory compliance, Tensile testing, Cell configurations, Experimental conditions, Experimental parameters, Ni based alloy, Slow strain rate tensile test, Sulfuric acid solution, Strain rate
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-40476 (URN)2-s2.0-85070068401 (Scopus ID)
Conference
NACE - International Corrosion Conference Series 24 March 2019 through 28 March 2019
Available from: 2019-10-10 Created: 2019-10-10 Last updated: 2023-05-16Bibliographically approved
Ayagou, M., Joshi, G. R., Tran, T. T., Sutter, E., Tribollet, B., Mendibide, C., . . . Kittel, J. (2019). Corrosion and hydrogen permeation in H 2 S environments with O 2 contamination, Part 2: Impact of H 2 S partial pressure. Corrosion, 75(4), 389-397
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Corrosion and hydrogen permeation in H 2 S environments with O 2 contamination, Part 2: Impact of H 2 S partial pressure
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2019 (English)In: Corrosion, ISSN 0010-9312, E-ISSN 1938-159X, Vol. 75, no 4, p. 389-397Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Materials selection in the oil and gas industry relies on engineering standards, such as NACE TM0177 and NACE TM0284, which stipulate that oxygen contamination should be avoided during materials testing in H 2 S-containing media. In this second paper, as part of a series of articles that evaluates how traces of oxygen modify the corrosion of pure iron and hydrogen permeation across iron membranes in H 2 S-containing solutions, the impact of changing the H 2 S partial pressure from 100 kPa to 0.1 kPa was investigated. It was found that bulk solution chemistry for all H 2 S partial pressures changes with time, due to the formation of H 2 S–O 2 reaction products (sulfates, sulfites, and thiosulfates), which results in bulk solution acidification. Electrochemical and weight-loss measurements confirm that Fe corrosion rates in baseline well-deaerated H 2 S-containing solutions decrease with decreasing H 2 S partial pressure, although these are observed to be much higher under continuous oxygen contamination. With decreasing H 2 S partial pressure, hydrogen uptake in Fe also decreases, due to lower and lower concentrations of dissolved H 2 S and the associated increase in pH. However, even at 1 kPa and 0.1 kPa H 2 S, permeation effciencies remain close to 100% when no O 2 contamination is present. The hydrogen uptake is always relatively lower in Fe exposed to oxygen-polluted H 2 S solutions. Permeation efficiencies decrease continuously. From electrochemical data and surface characterization, these observations at lower H 2 S partial pressures are attributed to the disruptive effect of oxygen on the nature of sulfide corrosion products, and hydrogen entry promotion, along with the contribution of an additional cathodic reaction that does not result in hydrogen entry into the metal

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
National Assoc. of Corrosion Engineers International, 2019
Keywords
Hydrogen permeation, Hydrogen sulfide, Hydrogen-induced cracking, Sulfide stress cracking, Contamination, Corrosion rate, Gas industry, Hydrogen embrittlement, Materials testing, Partial pressure, Permeation, Solution mining, Sulfur compounds, Electrochemical data, Engineering standards, Hydrogen induced cracking, Oxygen contamination, Surface characterization, Weight loss measurements, Iron
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-39990 (URN)10.5006/3092 (DOI)2-s2.0-85063677833 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-09 Created: 2019-10-09 Last updated: 2021-06-17Bibliographically approved
Martien, D., Mendibide, C., Duret-Thual, C., Jean, K., Ferrando, N., Sutter, E., . . . Tribollet, B. (2019). EIS study of iron and steel corrosion in aqueous solutions at various concentrations of dissolved H2S: Impact of oxygen contamination. In: NACE - International Corrosion Conference SeriesVolume 2019-March, 2019, Article number 13041Corrosion Conference and Expo 2019; Nashville; United States; 24 March 2019 through 28 March 2019: . Paper presented at NACE - International Corrosion Conference Series Volume 2019-March, 2019, Article number 13041 Corrosion Conference and Expo 2019; Nashville; United States; 24 March 2019 through 28 March 2019. National Assoc. of Corrosion Engineers International
Open this publication in new window or tab >>EIS study of iron and steel corrosion in aqueous solutions at various concentrations of dissolved H2S: Impact of oxygen contamination
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2019 (English)In: NACE - International Corrosion Conference SeriesVolume 2019-March, 2019, Article number 13041Corrosion Conference and Expo 2019; Nashville; United States; 24 March 2019 through 28 March 2019, National Assoc. of Corrosion Engineers International , 2019Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Mildly acidic water containing dissolved H2S presents a strong risk in the cracking of low-carbon steels. Several studies on H2S cracking mechanisms have shown that the main driving force is linked to the ability of H2S to promote hydrogen entry into the bulk material. Standard test methods have been developed and published as NACE technical standards (e.g. NACE TM0284 and NACE TM0177) to aid materials selection in the oil and gas sector. Though it is recognized that oxygen pollution should be avoided during H2S cracking tests, there is a lack of experimental data to illustrate the effects of a small oxygen pollution. Dissolved oxygen concentrations greater than the recommended upper limit (50 parts per billion) can easily be obtained in the case of poor laboratory practices. This paper will focus on the interactions between oxygen and H2S on electrochemical behavior of unalloyed steel. A continuous O2 injection at a level corresponding to 500 ppb is applied, together with H2S bubbling in our test solutions, for periods lasting the same order as SSC standard tests. Steel surface reaction phenomena/corrosion rates in H2S saturated solution, with or without oxygen pollution, are studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The evolution of corrosion rates obtained from impedance analysis was compared to two other independent methods: i/ weight loss measurements and, ii/ hydrogen permeation. Without O2 pollution, a permeation efficiency of 100% was obtained, as expected. Permeation current density was thus found to match precisely with the corrosion current density determined by impedance analysis at different times. On the other hand, when a continuous O2 pollution was added in the system, significantly higher corrosion rates were observed, associated with test solution acidification. At the same time, permeation efficiency was decreased by up to one order of magnitude. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
National Assoc. of Corrosion Engineers International, 2019
Keywords
H2S, HIC, Hydrogen embrittlement, Hydrogen permeation, O2, SSC, X65 steel, Corrosion rate, Dissolution, Dissolved oxygen, Efficiency, Electric impedance, Electrochemical corrosion, Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, Gas industry, Hydrogen, Low carbon steel, Permeation, Pollution, Pollution induced corrosion, Reaction rates, Surface reactions, Testing, Corrosion current densities, Dissolved oxygen concentrations, Electrochemical behaviors, Oxygen contamination, Standard test method, Weight loss measurements, X-65 steel, Steel corrosion
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-39999 (URN)2-s2.0-85070111408 (Scopus ID)
Conference
NACE - International Corrosion Conference Series Volume 2019-March, 2019, Article number 13041 Corrosion Conference and Expo 2019; Nashville; United States; 24 March 2019 through 28 March 2019
Available from: 2019-10-16 Created: 2019-10-16 Last updated: 2021-06-17Bibliographically approved
Deffo Ayagou, M., Joshi, G., Mai Tran, T., Tribollet, B., Sutter, E., Mendibide, C., . . . Kittel, J. (2019). Impact of oxygen contamination on the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of iron corrosion in H2S solutions. Corrosion Science, Article ID 108302.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of oxygen contamination on the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of iron corrosion in H2S solutions
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2019 (English)In: Corrosion Science, ISSN 0010-938X, E-ISSN 1879-0496, article id 108302Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Oxygen pollution in hydrogen sulfide (H2S) saturated test solutions can compromise the results of standardized tests, which guide materials selection in safety-critical components. To examine the temporal evolution of such contamination, we have used the electrochemical methods of impedance spectroscopy and hydrogen permeation to study the corrosion of iron exposed to oxygen-polluted H2S-saturated solutions. EIS analyses were performed with a previously developed model, which explicitly accounts for the contribution of a conductive and porous iron sulfide overlayer. A good correlation is found between corrosion estimates from EIS and weight loss, measured to be higher than the O2-free case. Hydrogen permeation studies across the iron membrane were conducted to qualitatively evaluate the impact of dissolved O2 on hydrogen entry. We observe that O2 contamination was found to significantly reduce hydrogen charging into the metal. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Corrosion, EIS, H2S, Iron, Oxygen, Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, Permeation, Pollution induced corrosion, Safety engineering, Spectroscopy, Sulfur compounds, ELectrochemical methods, Hydrogen permeation, Hydrogen permeation studies, Impedance spectroscopy, Materials selection, Oxygen contamination, Safety critical components, Saturated solutions, Electrochemical corrosion
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-42109 (URN)10.1016/j.corsci.2019.108302 (DOI)2-s2.0-85075328788 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-16 Created: 2019-12-16 Last updated: 2021-06-17Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5399-9274

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