Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Peterson, A., Wallinder, J., Bengtsson, J., Idström, A., Bialik, M., Jedvert, K. & de la Motte, H. (2022). Chemical Recycling of a Textile Blend from Polyester and Viscose, Part I: Process Description, Characterization, and Utilization of the Recycled Cellulose. Sustainability, 14(12), Article ID 7272.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chemical Recycling of a Textile Blend from Polyester and Viscose, Part I: Process Description, Characterization, and Utilization of the Recycled Cellulose
Show others...
2022 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 12, article id 7272Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Material recycling requires solutions that are technically, as well as economically and ecologically, viable. In this work, the technical feasibility to separate textile blends of viscose and polyester using alkaline hydrolysis is demonstrated. Polyester is depolymerized into the monomer terephthalic acid at high yields, while viscose is recovered in a polymeric form. After the alkaline treatment, the intrinsic viscosity of cellulose is decreased by up to 35%, which means it may not be suitable for conventional fiber-to-fiber recycling; however, it might be attractive in other technologies, such as emerging fiber processes, or as raw material for sugar platforms. Further, we present an upscaled industrial process layout, which is used to pinpoint the areas of the proposed process that require further optimization. The NaOH economy is identified as the key to an economically viable process, and several recommendations are given to decrease the consumption of NaOH. To further enhance the ecological end economic feasibility of the process, an increased hydrolysis rate and integration with a pulp mill are suggested. © 2022 by the authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
industrial process layout, polyester, textile blend, textile recycling, viscose, cellulose, feasibility study, hydrolysis, recycling, textile industry
National Category
Other Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-59842 (URN)10.3390/su14127272 (DOI)2-s2.0-85132547021 (Scopus ID)
Note

Correspondence Address: de la Motte, H.; RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Argongatan 30, Box 104, Sweden; email: hanna.delamotte@ri.se; Funding details: Södra Skogsägarnas Stiftelse för Forskning, Utveckling och Utbildning, 2019-106; Funding text 1: Funding: This research was funded by Södra Skogsägarnas stiftelse för Forskning, Utveckling och Utbildning, grant number 2019-106.

Available from: 2022-08-03 Created: 2022-08-03 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Bialik, M., Jensen, A., Kotilainen, O., Kulander, I. & Lopes, M. (2020). Design, optimization and modelling of a chemical recovery system for wet spinning of cellulose in sodium carbonate solutions. Cellulose, 27, 8681-8693
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design, optimization and modelling of a chemical recovery system for wet spinning of cellulose in sodium carbonate solutions
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Cellulose, ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 27, p. 8681-8693Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study is to present the design, optimization and modelling of a chemical recovery system for a novel CS2-free viscose-type process that entails dissolution of pre-treated dissolving pulp in a continuous-flow reactor in cold alkali and wet spinning of cellulose in sodium carbonate solutions. Technologies already known to other industries for the recovery and reuse of chemicals, such as causticizing, recalcination, recarbonization and freeze-separation, were used. Chemical equilibria simulations were performed with OLI Studio 9.5, with the purpose to select experimental conditions which avoid undesired precipitations in each unit operation. Synthetic solutions mimicking the spent coagulation liquor were used in the laboratorial experiments. The proposed chemical recovery system was shown to be technically feasible and reduce chemical make-ups to a minimum of 45 kg/ton of NaOH and 4 kg/ton of H2SO4. Small amounts of Zn are expected to precipitate during recarbonization of the coagulation liquor at 30 °C and causticizing at 98 °C. Thus, a filter for ZnO particles should be included in the design of the recarbonization unit and a continuous purge of lime mud and input of fresh lime make-up should be needed to keep burnt lime availability at an acceptable level. Overall, the results presented in this study portray a solution to reduce operating costs and the environmental impact of novel viscose-type processes with alkaline spin dopes and wet spinning of cellulose in sodium carbonate solutions. © 2020, The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Causticizing, Chemical recovery, Freeze-crystallization, Process modelling, Recarbonization, Regenerated cellulose, Textile fibre, Alkalinity, Calcium oxide, Carbonation, Cellulose, Coagulation, Environmental impact, II-VI semiconductors, Lime, Operating costs, Oxide minerals, Recovery, Sodium Carbonate, Sodium hydroxide, Structural design, Zinc oxide, Chemical equilibriums, Chemical recovery systems, Continuous flow reactors, Dissolving pulp, Experimental conditions, Recalcination, Synthetic solutions, ZnO particles, Molecular biology
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-47690 (URN)10.1007/s10570-020-03394-1 (DOI)2-s2.0-85089742374 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: 720729; Funding text 1: Open access funding provided by RISE Research Institutes of Sweden. This research was conducted within the Project “NeoCel” that received funding from the Bio Based Industries Joint Undertaking within the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program, under Grant Agreement No. 720729.

Available from: 2020-09-01 Created: 2020-09-01 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, K., Kulander, I., Törngren, P. & Bialik, M. (2018). Soap separation: A new option for removal of NPEs. In: Pulping Engineering and Environmental Recycling Sustainability Conference, PEERS 2018: Technical Solutions for Today and Beyond. Paper presented at Pulping Engineering and Environmental Recycling Sustainability Conference 2018: Technical Solutions for Today and Beyond, PEERS 2018; Portland; United States; 28 October 2018 through 31 October 2018 (pp. 272-277). TAPPI Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Soap separation: A new option for removal of NPEs
2018 (English)In: Pulping Engineering and Environmental Recycling Sustainability Conference, PEERS 2018: Technical Solutions for Today and Beyond, TAPPI Press , 2018, p. 272-277Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Non-process elements (NPEs) are elements present in the process streams without taking part in the desired reaction. With increasing process closure and new NPE-rich input streams such as gasified bark in the lime kiln and the destruction of biosludge in the recovery boiler, the traditional purge points may prove insufficient. A new method to remove NPEs is suggested: Removal of NPEs from tall oil brine. The idea is based on the fact that many elements are enriched in the soap and separated from the black liquor but are later led back to the black liquor with the brine. The results showed strong enrichment of Ba, Ca, Mg, Mn, P and Zn in soap; an enrichment factor of 8 or higher was observed. Laboratory experiments where tall oil brine has been alkalized and subjected to a separation stage have been conducted. The laboratory experiments showed that more than 90% of Al, Ba, Mg, Mn and P precipitates and could be removed with the solid phase if alkalized to pH 11. The separation efficiency varied for Ca and Si from 70-85 %. To conclude, removal of non-process elements from tall oil brine is a promising new kidney, especially for P and Si.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAPPI Press, 2018
Keywords
Lime, Recycling, Separation, Tall oil, Laboratory experiments, Non process elements, Process streams, Recovery boilers, Separation efficiency, Soap separation, Sustainable development
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-38944 (URN)2-s2.0-85064932940 (Scopus ID)
Conference
Pulping Engineering and Environmental Recycling Sustainability Conference 2018: Technical Solutions for Today and Beyond, PEERS 2018; Portland; United States; 28 October 2018 through 31 October 2018
Note

cited By 0

Available from: 2019-06-03 Created: 2019-06-03 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, K., Kulander, I., Törngren, P. & Bialik, M. (2018). Soap separation: a new option for removal of NPEs. In: Technical solutions for today and beyond: TAPPI PEERS conference. Paper presented at TAPPI PEERS Conference, October 28-31, 2018, Portland, USA (pp. 154-159).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Soap separation: a new option for removal of NPEs
2018 (English)In: Technical solutions for today and beyond: TAPPI PEERS conference, 2018, p. 154-159Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Keywords
tall oil, soap, separation, non-process element
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-36533 (URN)
Conference
TAPPI PEERS Conference, October 28-31, 2018, Portland, USA
Available from: 2018-11-26 Created: 2018-11-26 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Ahlroth, M., Bialik, M., Jansson, M. & Rosenqvist, K. (2017). Bark and wood powder firing in the recovery boiler for maximum power generation. In: International chemical recovery conference, May 24-26, 2017, Halifax, Canada: . Paper presented at International chemical recovery conference (ICRC 2017), May 24-26, 2017, Halifax, Canada. PAPTAC
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bark and wood powder firing in the recovery boiler for maximum power generation
2017 (English)In: International chemical recovery conference, May 24-26, 2017, Halifax, Canada, PAPTAC , 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The effect of co-firing bark or wood powder in a recovery boiler is studied. The effect of increased NPEs in the liquor and lime cycles, the FMT and sticky dust and the smelt composition is assessed by using simulation tools. The results indicate that generating an additional 22-39% HP steam for power production by firing wood powder in the recovery boiler is a viable option, if Cl and K are purged from the ESP dust by a treatment unit. The smelt is enriched with the same proportion of NPEs as the as-fired liquor.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PAPTAC, 2017
Keywords
recovery furnace, biomass, firing, non process element, simulation
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-33013 (URN)
Conference
International chemical recovery conference (ICRC 2017), May 24-26, 2017, Halifax, Canada
Available from: 2018-01-10 Created: 2018-01-10 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Ahlroth, M., Bialik, M. & Jensen, A. (2017). Hydrothermal carbonisation of effluent sludge. In: The 7th Nordic Wood Biorefinery Conference held in Stockholm, Sweden, 28-30 Mar. 2017: NWBC 2017. Paper presented at 7th Nordic Wood Biorefinery Conference held in Stockholm, Sweden, 28-30 Mar. 2017 (pp. 156-158). Stockholm: RISE Bioekonomi
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hydrothermal carbonisation of effluent sludge
2017 (English)In: The 7th Nordic Wood Biorefinery Conference held in Stockholm, Sweden, 28-30 Mar. 2017: NWBC 2017, Stockholm: RISE Bioekonomi , 2017, p. 156-158Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Research was carried out to investigate hydrothermal carbonisation (HTC) treatment of different effluent sludges from the pulp and paper industry in a Parr-reactor. Sludge samples were evaluated from a thermomechanical paper (TMP) mill and a kraft market pulp mill (NSWBK). The issues studied included HTC treatment time; addition of acid and alkali; dewatering properties of the resulting slurry; and non-process element (NPE) concentration in the original sludge, the filtrate and the filter cake. It was found that HTC improved the fuel quality. Alkali metals were depleted in TMP and NSWBK sludge and in both cases, the sludge was easier to dewater. The yield was better for TMP than NSWBK sludge and the yield losses had a negative impact on the NSWBK sludge. TMP sludge was already a viable boiler fuel and the treatment improved the fuel qualities even more. The HTC treatment of the NSWBK sludge resulted in lower chlorine and potassium, with lower fuel-nitrogen resulting in lower nitrous oxide. Although HTC treatment improved the low heating value of the sludge, this was counteracted by yield loss. Compared with untreated NSWBK, the overall energy impact was negative. HTC treatment offered mixed opportunities from the viewpoint of the recovery cycle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: RISE Bioekonomi, 2017
Keywords
carbonisation, effluent treatment, heat treatment, heating value, non process element, paper mill effluent, pulp mill effluent, sludge dewatering, sludge disposal
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-29745 (URN)9789186018207 (ISBN)
Conference
7th Nordic Wood Biorefinery Conference held in Stockholm, Sweden, 28-30 Mar. 2017
Available from: 2017-05-31 Created: 2017-05-31 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Wolf, J., Bialik, M. & Jensen, A. (2017). Modelling of precipitation of silicon, aluminium and phosphorus into green liquor dregs. In: International chemical recovery conference, May 24-26, 2017, Halifax, Canada: . Paper presented at International chemical recovery conference (ICRC 2017), May 24-26, 2017, Halifax , Canada.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modelling of precipitation of silicon, aluminium and phosphorus into green liquor dregs
2017 (English)In: International chemical recovery conference, May 24-26, 2017, Halifax, Canada, 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A set of empirical equations is presented for modelling the precipitation of aluminium, silicon and phosphorous in green liquor plants as a function of initial concentrations of these elements plus magnesium, calcium and alkali in the dissolver. As process parameters, the model includes residence time and temperature. Concentrations, temperature and residence time have been varied according to a factor design plan. Main findings are that in laboratory experiments it was possible to remove aluminium, silicon and phosphorous down to concentrations below their solubility in white liquor thus avoiding accumulation of these elements in the lime cycle. In addition, the experimental work showed that the initial concentrations of aluminium, silicon and phosphorous in raw green liquor have a strong increasing impact on their concentrations in filtered green liquor.

Keywords
non process element, green liquor, solubility, laboratory experiment, modelling, precipitation, aluminium, silicon, phosphorus
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-33024 (URN)
Conference
International chemical recovery conference (ICRC 2017), May 24-26, 2017, Halifax , Canada
Available from: 2018-01-10 Created: 2018-01-10 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Bialik, M., Jensen, A., Rahman, H. & Langer, V. (2017). Na2CO3-Na2SO4-double salt scaling in black liquor evaporators: solubility experiments in model solutions. In: International chemical recovery conference, May 24-26, 2017, Halifax, Canada: . Paper presented at International chemical recovery conference (ICRC 2017), May 24-26, 2017, Halifax, Canada.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Na2CO3-Na2SO4-double salt scaling in black liquor evaporators: solubility experiments in model solutions
2017 (English)In: International chemical recovery conference, May 24-26, 2017, Halifax, Canada, 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Scaling by Na2CO3-Na2SO4-type solids counts among the most common problems in black liquor evaporation. Previous studies have identified two double salts precipitating from Na-CO3-SO4 solutions: burkeite, Na2CO3·2Na2SO4 and (sodium sulphate) dicarbonate, Na2SO4·2Na2CO3. The latter is believed to be more prone to cause scaling. However, it has long been suspected that other double salts, with largely unknown properties, may form in this system. This work summarizes the results of precipitation studies in the Na2CO3-Na2SO4-(additive) system targeting the transition zone between burkeite and dicarbonate formation. At least one additional double salt has been identified by X-ray diffraction in both bulk crystals and in the scale. The solubility data and the equilibrium liquor compositions have been compared with earlier models

Keywords
black liquor, scaling, evaporation, burkeite, crystallisation, solubility
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-33026 (URN)
Conference
International chemical recovery conference (ICRC 2017), May 24-26, 2017, Halifax, Canada
Available from: 2018-01-11 Created: 2018-01-11 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Bialik, M., Jensen, A. & Ahlroth, M. (2015). New challenges regarding nonprocess elements in the liquor and lime cycle. TAPPI Journal, 14(7), 421-429
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New challenges regarding nonprocess elements in the liquor and lime cycle
2015 (English)In: TAPPI Journal, ISSN 0734-1415, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 421-429Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Optimal performance of the green liquor plant, recausticizing plant, and lime cycle is vital for adequate white liquor availability and quality as well as for a mill's energy efficiency. Recently, various problems in the liquor and lime cycle have been frequently reported by our industrial partners, including poor performance of green liquor filters or sludge filters, decreased filterability of lime mud, increased lime kiln dead load, and poorquality white liquor. Those problems are most likely caused by an accumulation of nonprocess elements in the liquor and lime cycle due to increased mill closure, increased use of biofuels, or both. Data from the literature and earlier studies have been analyzed with regard to the occurrence and concentration of nonprocess elements in various process streams, including filtered green liquor, green liquor sludge, lime mud, and white liquor. The mineral forms in which nonprocess elements often precipitate were also studied, together with the common knowledge and rules of thumb used by mills for dealing with the problems. The literature data are compared with the newest analytical results from a sampling campaign involving several mills with varying process solutions with respect to nonprocess elements. The consequences and possible recommendations for the mills are presented. Application: Kraft pulp mills can use this information to diagnose and possibly solve problems related to nonprocess elements in day-to-day mill operation.

National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-778 (URN)10.32964/tj14.7.421 (DOI)2-s2.0-84938512156 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-14 Created: 2016-08-03 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Bialik, M., Björklund Jansson, M. & Törngren, P. (2014). Influence of wood extractives on calcium balance during kraft cooking (ed.). In: : . Paper presented at 13th European workshop on lignocellulosics and pulp.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of wood extractives on calcium balance during kraft cooking
2014 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Publisher
p. 4
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-9543 (URN)
Conference
13th European workshop on lignocellulosics and pulp
Available from: 2016-09-12 Created: 2016-09-12 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6692-8122

Search in DiVA

Show all publications