Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Publications (10 of 33) Show all publications
Wästerlid, C., Rahnama, H., Ström, M., Abrahamsson, L., Öhrvall Rönnbäck, A. & Jönsson, C. (2023). The Table & Swirl Method : A Quick Visualization Method for Aspects of Circular Material Streams.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Table & Swirl Method : A Quick Visualization Method for Aspects of Circular Material Streams
Show others...
2023 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This document describes the Table & Swirl method, which is a quick visualization method for aspects of circular material streams. Use the method to structure and visualize information to understand and share aspects of material streams in a circular economy. It is a time efficient way to start interesting discussions on any topic related to a circular material stream. The method is built around the Table, a tool to in a structured way gather information and the Swirl, which provides quick visualization.

The feedback from our test workshops and end-users were: • ”An eye opener!” • ”First, I thought the model was too simple, then I realized how quickly we got into interesting discussions.”

This method was developed in the year 2023 by the Research Institute of Sweden (RISE) and Luleå University of Technology (LTU) in the joint project “Feasibility study: Five circular material streams for batteries“, which was financed by Energimyndigheten, the Swedish Energy Agency.

Publisher
p. 12
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-67758 (URN)978-91-89896-00-0 (ISBN)
Note

Financed by Energimyndigheten, the Swedish Energy Agency.

Available from: 2023-11-15 Created: 2023-11-15 Last updated: 2023-11-21Bibliographically approved
Jönsson, C., Wei, R., Biundo, A., Landberg, J., Schwarz Bour, L., Pezzotti, F., . . . Syrén, P.-O. (2021). Biocatalysis in the Recycling Landscape for Synthetic Polymers and Plastics towards Circular Textiles. ChemSusChem, 14(19), 4028
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biocatalysis in the Recycling Landscape for Synthetic Polymers and Plastics towards Circular Textiles
Show others...
2021 (English)In: ChemSusChem, ISSN 1864-5631, E-ISSN 1864-564X, Vol. 14, no 19, p. 4028-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although recovery of fibers from used textiles with retained material quality is desired, separation of individual components from polymer blends used in today's complex textile materials is currently not available at viable scale. Biotechnology could provide a solution to this pressing problem by enabling selective depolymerization of recyclable fibers of natural and synthetic origin, to isolate constituents or even recover monomers. We compiled experimental data for biocatalytic polymer degradation with a focus on synthetic polymers with hydrolysable links and calculated conversion rates to explore this path The analysis emphasizes that we urgently need major research efforts: beyond cellulose-based fibers, biotechnological-assisted depolymerization of plastics so far only works for polyethylene terephthalate, with degradation of a few other relevant synthetic polymer chains being reported. In contrast, by analyzing market data and emerging trends for synthetic fibers in the textile industry, in combination with numbers from used garment collection and sorting plants, it was shown that the use of difficult-to-recycle blended materials is rapidly growing. If the lack of recycling technology and production trend for fiber blends remains, a volume of more than 3400 Mt of waste will have been accumulated by 2030. This work highlights the urgent need to transform the textile industry from a biocatalytic perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlag, 2021
Keywords
biocatalysis, enzyme engineering, plastics, recycling, textile, Biotechnology, Elastomers, Garment industry, Plants (botany), Plastic bottles, Polymer blends, Synthetic textile fibers, Textile blends, Textile industry, Blended materials, Individual components, Material quality, Polymer degradation, Recycling technology, Research efforts, Synthetic polymers, Textile materials, Plastic recycling
National Category
Polymer Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-52499 (URN)10.1002/cssc.202002666 (DOI)2-s2.0-85100841511 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Energimyndigheten; Funding details: 2017‐01116; Funding details: VINNOVA, 2019‐03174; Funding details: Horizon 2020, 870294; Funding text 1: This work was generously supported by the Swedish Energy Agency/VINNOVA under the project Re:Mix 2017‐002010, project C1Bio (Grant no. 2019‐03174) and by a FORMAS young research leader fellowship (Grant no. 2017‐01116). The authors thank Malin Wennberg at RISE and Anna Pehrsson, Texaid for fruitful discussions. We thank Susan Falck at RISE for assistance in figure preparation and Patricia Saenz‐Méndez for fruitful discussions. The authors R.W. and U.T.B. acknowledge funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement no. 870294 for the project MIX‐UP. Author C.J. also acknowledge funding support from VINNOVA within Sustainable production ‐ XPRES – Swedish Initiative for excellence in production research.

Available from: 2021-03-01 Created: 2021-03-01 Last updated: 2023-05-22Bibliographically approved
Holmquist, H., Roos, S., Schellenberger, S., Jönsson, C. & Peters, G. (2021). What difference can drop-in substitution actually make?: A life cycle assessment of alternative water repellent chemicals. Journal of Cleaner Production, 329, Article ID 129661.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What difference can drop-in substitution actually make?: A life cycle assessment of alternative water repellent chemicals
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 329, article id 129661Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are used in durable water repellents (DWRs) on outdoor garments and manufacturers are currently phasing out hazardous PFASs. A critical question is: which alternatives should be chosen? The answer should depend on a holistic assessment, but the published inventory data and methodological guidance for assessing PFAS in products is slim and typically limited to hazard assessment. We aim to provide a holistic assessment of the potential environmental consequences of this phase out of DWRs, going beyond the more traditional hazard-focused substitution assessment to also include a broad life-cycle-based assessment of PFASs and their drop-in alternatives. In this study, potential environmental consequences of the phase out were evaluated by applying a life cycle assessment (LCA) to shell jackets with side-chain fluorinated polymer based (i.e., PFASs) or non-fluorinated alternative DWRs with the aim to support a substitution assessment. We demonstrated an innovative approach to impact assessment by inclusion of PFAS related fate and toxicity and invested effort towards contributing new primary inventory data by using a combination of industry dialogue and performance measurements from our larger project context. From a methodological point of view, this paper demonstrates the state-of-the-art in product LCA of persistent textile chemicals and identifies the current limits of this assessment approach. It also delivers new LCI data of use to other analysts. The LCA results in this paper suggest that jackets without PFASs are environmentally preferable. Potential problem shifting due to increased washing and reimpregnation of the jackets did not outweigh PFAS-related potential toxicity impacts as indicated by LCA results. Based on the results presented here, specific DWRs within the non-fluorinated DWR group could not be identified as preferable to others. This LCA does however provide a relevant starting point for more detailed studies on specific DWR systems and it supports moves to phase-out PFASs from non-essential DWR uses. © 2021 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2021
Keywords
LCA, PFAS, Phase out, Problem shifting, Shell garments, Drops, Environmental impact, Hazards, Toxicity, Waterproofing, Alternative waters, Critical questions, Environmental consequences, Hazard Assessment, Inventory data, Polyfluoroalkyl substances, Shell garment, Water repellents, Life cycle
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-57331 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2021.129661 (DOI)2-s2.0-85119583382 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding details: Stiftelsen för Miljöstrategisk Forskning, 2018/11; Funding details: European Commission, EC, 101036756; Funding details: Svenska Forskningsrådet Formas, 2012–2148; Funding text 1: This research was funded by the Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning (FORMAS) grant agreement No. 2012–2148 (Project SUPFES). Additional funding from the European Commission (project ZeroPM, grant 101036756 ), XPRES (Initiative for Excellence in Production Research) and the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research (Mistra: project Mistra SafeChem, project number 2018/11 ) for the final editing is gratefully acknowledged.

Available from: 2021-12-28 Created: 2021-12-28 Last updated: 2021-12-28Bibliographically approved
Roos, S., Posner, S., Jönsson, C., Olsson, E., Linden, H., Schellenberger, S., . . . Arvidsson, R. (2020). A Function-Based Approach for Life Cycle Management of Chemicals in the Textile Industry. Sustainability, 12(3), Article ID 1273.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Function-Based Approach for Life Cycle Management of Chemicals in the Textile Industry
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 3, article id 1273Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Consumer products such as clothes and footwear sometimes contain chemical substances with properties that pose a risk to human health and the environment. These substances, restricted by law or company policy, are in focus for chemicals management processes by textile retailers. However, complex and non-transparent supply chains, and limited chemical knowledge, makes chemicals management challenging. Therefore, a function-based approach for life cycle management (LCM) of chemicals was developed, based on results of previous projects and evaluated using a two-step Delphi process. The resulting approach aims to help retailers identify and substitute hazardous substances in products, and consists of three parts: (i) a function-based chemicals management concept model for different levels of chemical information within the supply chain, (ii) tools for non-chemists which explain chemical information, and (iii) a continuous provision of knowledge to stakeholders (e.g., retailers) in a network. This approach is successfully implemented by over 100 retailers in the Nordic countries, providing the textile industry with practical and robust tools to manage and substitute hazardous chemicals in products and production processes. We conclude that the developed approach provides an explicit link, communication, and knowledge sharing between actors in the supply chain, which has proven important in chemicals LCM.

Keywords
life cycle management (LCM); LCM practice; chemicals management; substitution; knowledge sharing; textile; leather; retail; implementation
National Category
Environmental Sciences Materials Chemistry Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-43937 (URN)10.3390/su12031273 (DOI)2-s2.0-85081256954 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Mistra Future FashionSUPFES
Funder
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Available from: 2020-02-17 Created: 2020-02-17 Last updated: 2023-06-08Bibliographically approved
Roos, S., Jönsson, C., Posner, S., Arvidsson, R. & Svanström, M. (2019). An inventory framework for inclusion of textile chemicals in life cycle assessment. The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 24(5), 838-847
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An inventory framework for inclusion of textile chemicals in life cycle assessment
Show others...
2019 (English)In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, ISSN 0948-3349, E-ISSN 1614-7502, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 838-847Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Toxicity impacts of chemicals have only been covered to a minor extent in LCA studies of textile products. The two main reasons for this exclusion are (1) the lack of life cycle inventory (LCI) data on use and emissions of textile-related chemicals, and (2) the lack of life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) data for calculating impacts based on the LCI data. This paper addresses the first of these two. Methods: In order to facilitate the LCI analysis for LCA practitioners, an inventory framework was developed. The framework builds on a nomenclature for textile-related chemicals which was used to build up a generic chemical product inventory for use in LCA of textiles. In the chemical product inventory, each chemical product and its content was modelled to fit the subsequent LCIA step. This means that the content and subsequent emission data are time-integrated, including both original content and, when relevant, transformation products as well as impurities. Another key feature of the framework is the modelling of modularised process performance in terms of emissions to air and water. Results and discussion: The inventory framework follows the traditional structure of LCI databases to allow for use together with existing LCI and LCIA data. It contains LCI data sets for common textile processes (unit processes), including use and emissions of textile-related chemicals. The data sets can be used for screening LCA studies and/or, due to their modular structure, also modified. Modified data sets can be modelled from recipes of input chemicals, where the chemical product inventory provides LCA-compatible content and emission data. The data sets and the chemical product inventory can also be used as data collection templates in more detailed LCA studies. Conclusions: A parallel development of a nomenclature for and acquisition of LCI data resulted in the creation of a modularised inventory framework. The framework advances the LCA method to provide results that can guide towards reduced environmental impact from textile production, including also the toxicity impacts from textile chemicals. Recommendations: The framework can be used for guiding stakeholders of the textile sector in macro-level decisions regarding the effectiveness of different impact reduction interventions, as well as for guiding on-site decisions in textile manufacturing.

Keywords
Chemical, LCA, Life cycle inventory, Textile, USEtox
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-36058 (URN)10.1007/s11367-018-1537-6 (DOI)2-s2.0-85055540338 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-07 Created: 2018-11-07 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Shahbazi, S., Kurdve, M., Zackrisson, M., Jönsson, C. & Kristinsdortter, A. R. (2019). Comparison of Four Environmental Assessment Tools in Swedish Manufacturing: A Case Study. Sustainability, 11(7), Article ID 2173.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of Four Environmental Assessment Tools in Swedish Manufacturing: A Case Study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 2173Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To achieve sustainable development goals, it is essential to include the industrial system. There are sufficient numbers of tools and methods for measuring, assessing and improving the quality, productivity and efficiency of production, but the number of tools and methods for environmental initiatives on the shop floor is rather low. Incorporating environmental considerations into production and performance management systems still generally involves a top-down approach aggregated for an entire manufacturing plant. Green lean studies have been attempting to fill this gap to some extent, but the lack of detailed methodologies and practical tools for environmental manufacturing improvement on the shop floor is still evident. This paper reports on the application of four environmental assessment tools commonly used among Swedish manufacturing companies—Green Performance Map (GPM), Environmental Value Stream Mapping (EVSM), Waste Flow Mapping (WFM), and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)—to help practitioners and scholars to understand the different features of each tool, so in turn the right tool(s) can be selected according to particular questions and the industrial settings. Because there are some overlap and differences between the tools and a given tool may be more appropriate to a situation depending on the question posed, a combination of tools is suggested to embrace different types of data collection and analysis to include different environmental impacts for better prioritization and decision-making.

Keywords
sustainable manufacturing; environmental assessment tool; green lean
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-38810 (URN)10.3390/su11072173 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-05-17 Created: 2019-05-17 Last updated: 2023-05-25
Hedberg, J., Fransson, K., Prideaux, S., Roos, S., Jönsson, C. & Wallinder, I. O. (2019). Improving the life cycle impact assessment of metal ecotoxicity: Importance of chromium speciation, water chemistry, and metal release. Sustainability, 11(6), Article ID 1655.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improving the life cycle impact assessment of metal ecotoxicity: Importance of chromium speciation, water chemistry, and metal release
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 6, article id 1655Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Investigations of metal ecotoxicity in life cycle assessment (LCA) and life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) are becoming important tools for evaluating the environmental impact of a product or process. There is, however, improvement needed for LCIA of metal ecotoxicity in order to make this assessment more relevant and robust. In this work, three issues within the LCIA of metal ecotoxicity are investigated, mainly focusing on topics related to stainless steel manufacturing. The first issue is the importance of considering regional water chemistry when constructing the characterization factor (CF). A model freshwater of relevance for stainless steel manufacturing in a region of Sweden was created with chemistry different from available options. The second issue is related to the lack of consideration on changes in speciation of Cr(VI) in freshwater for a given emission, as Cr(VI) to some extent will be reduced to Cr(III). Two new options are suggested based on relationships between the Cr(VI)-total Cr ratio as a way to improve the relevancy of LCIA for Cr(VI) in freshwater. The last issue is how to treat metal release from slags in LCIA. Metal release from slags was shown to vary significantly between different ways of modelling slag emissions (differences in total metal content, slag leaching tests, estimated emissions to groundwater). © 2019 by the authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2019
Keywords
Chromium, Chromium(VI), Ecotoxicity, Life cycle assessment, Life cycle impact assessment, Metal release, Nickel, Slag, Stainless steel, USEtox
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-38466 (URN)10.3390/su11061655 (DOI)2-s2.0-85063495702 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-06 Created: 2019-05-06 Last updated: 2022-02-10Bibliographically approved
Zackrisson, M., Jönsson, C., Johannisson, W., Fransson, K., Posner, S., Zenkert, D. & Lindbergh, G. (2019). Prospective life cycle assessment of a structural battery. Sustainability, 11(20), Article ID 5679.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prospective life cycle assessment of a structural battery
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 20, article id 5679Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

With increasing interest in reducing fossil fuel emissions, more and more development is focused on electric mobility. For electric vehicles, the main challenge is the mass of the batteries, which significantly increase the mass of the vehicles and limits their range. One possible concept to solve this is incorporating structural batteries; a structural material that both stores electrical energy and carries mechanical load. The concept envisions constructing the body of an electric vehicle with this material and thus reducing the need for further energy storage. This research is investigating a future structural battery that is incorporated in the roof of an electric vehicle. The structural battery is replacing the original steel roof of the vehicle, and part of the original traction battery. The environmental implications of this structural battery roof are investigated with a life cycle assessment, which shows that a structural battery roof can avoid climate impacts in substantive quantities. The main emissions for the structural battery stem from its production and efforts should be focused there to further improve the environmental benefits of the structural battery. Toxicity is investigated with a novel chemical risk assessment from a life cycle perspective, which shows that two chemicals should be targeted for substitution. © 2019 by the authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2019
Keywords
Chemical risk assessment, Environmental engineering, LCA, Lightweight, Multifunctional material, Prospective
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-40605 (URN)10.3390/su11205679 (DOI)2-s2.0-85073981782 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Computing Research Association, CRA; Funding details: 738085; Funding details: Vetenskapsrådet, VR, 621-2014-4577, 2017-03898; Funding details: Air Force Office of Scientific Research, AFOSR, FA9550-17-1-0244; Funding text 1: This research was funded by the XPRES initiative, the Swedish Research Council, projects 2017-03898 and 621-2014-4577, the strategic innovation program LIGHTer (funding provided by Vinnova, the Swedish Energy Agency and Formas), H2020 Clean Sky II project no. 738085 and by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under award number FA9550-17-1-0244. The LCA and CRA have been carried out by RISE IVF in close cooperation with the structural battery research group (Kombatt) at the Department of Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering and Department of Chemical Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology. The results of the LCA and CRA was communicated to the structural battery research group in an idea generation workshop in order to make the most possible use of the LCA results. It resulted in 35 ideas aiming at improving the environmental performance of a structural battery.

Available from: 2019-11-12 Created: 2019-11-12 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Schellenberger, S., Jönsson, C., Mellin, P., Levenstam, O. A., Liagkouridis, I., Ribbenstedt, A., . . . Benskin, J. P. (2019). Release of Side-Chain Fluorinated Polymer-Containing Microplastic Fibers from Functional Textiles During Washing and First Estimates of Perfluoroalkyl Acid Emissions.. Environmental Science and Technology, 53(24), 14329-14338
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Release of Side-Chain Fluorinated Polymer-Containing Microplastic Fibers from Functional Textiles During Washing and First Estimates of Perfluoroalkyl Acid Emissions.
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 53, no 24, p. 14329-14338Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The quantity and composition of fibers released from functional textiles during accelerated washing were investigated using the GyroWash method. Two fabrics [polyamide (PA) and polyester/cotton (PES/CO)] were selected and coated with perfluorohexane-based side-chain fluorinated polymers. Fibers released during washing ranged from ∼10 to 500 μ with a similar distribution for the two textile types. The PA-based fabric released considerably more fibers >20 μm in length compared to the PES/CO-based fabric (>1000/GyroWash for PA vs ∼200/GyroWash fibers for PES/CO). After one GyroWash (2-15 domestic washes), fibers that contained approximately 240 and 1300 μg total fluorine per square meter (μg F/m2) were released from the PA and PES/CO fabrics, respectively. Current understanding of the fate of microplastic fibers suggests that a large fraction of these fibers reach the environment either in effluent wastewater or sewage sludge applied to land. In the environment, the fluorinated side chains will be slowly cleaved from the backbone of the side-chain fluorinated polymers coated on the fibers and then transformed into short-chain perfluoroalkyl acids. On the European scale, emissions of up to ∼0.7 t of fluorotelomer alcohol (6:2 FTOH) per year were estimated for outdoor rain jackets treated with fluorotelomer-based side-chain fluorinated polymers.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-42537 (URN)10.1021/acs.est.9b04165 (DOI)31697071 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85076245307 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-01-10 Created: 2020-01-10 Last updated: 2023-06-08Bibliographically approved
Roos, S., Larsson, M. & Jönsson, C. (2019). Supply chain guidelines: vision and ecodesignaction list.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Supply chain guidelines: vision and ecodesignaction list
2019 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This guideline aims to inspire fashion companies that wants to transform their supplychain to become sustainable. It intends to inform about the current available knowledgethat research can offer and hopefully provide some answers to the issues that refraincompanies from starting the transition.

The first chapter gives an overview of environmental impacts associated with textileproduction in relation to the carrying capacity of the earth. The recommendations for thetextile industry to keep within the planetary boundaries are:

• by 2030 reduce emissions of greenhouse gases from textile use by 50%, and by 2050be carbon-neutral;

• by 2030 textile companies have knowledge of main suppliers’ water sources andrecipients, and the mean monthly river flows. By 2050, the control variable is suggestedto blue water withdrawal as % of mean monthly river flow and cooperation with otherlocal users.

• by 2030 phase out all persistent organic pollutants (POP) from textile production andminimize use of chemicals as well as responsible handling of chemicals.

The second chapter discuss the methodology used for developing the guidelines. Thetechnique of back casting was used to create a vision for how a sustainable supply chainliving up to the recommendations above could look like. The next step was to collect aseries of technical solutions that can reduce the environmental impacts, both via industrydialogue and literature sources.

Finally, the Results chapter presents the actions that have been identified as feasible withtoday’s available technology and with high efficiency in reducing environmental impact.The results chapter also quantifies the effects that the proposed actions would have. Allproposed actions are linked to technologies which are available in bulk scale today.The guidance document ends with the Ecodesign Action List where the intent is for acompany to in a systematic way see what actions are possible, starting with the actionsof highest impact reduction potential first and saving the less efficient (but still efficient)actions for last.

Series
Mistra Future Fashion ; 2019:06
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-40580 (URN)978-91-89049-31-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-10-22 Created: 2019-10-22 Last updated: 2019-10-22
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3124-1723

Search in DiVA

Show all publications