Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Kuna, V. K., Rosales, A., Hisdal, J., Osnes, E. K., Sundhagen, J. O., Bäckdahl, H., . . . Jørgensen, J. J. (2015). RETRACTED: Successful tissue engineering of competent allogeneic venous valves (ed.). Journal of Vascular Surgery: Venous and Lymphatic Disorders, 3(4), 421-430
Open this publication in new window or tab >>RETRACTED: Successful tissue engineering of competent allogeneic venous valves
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Journal of Vascular Surgery: Venous and Lymphatic Disorders, ISSN 2213-333X, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 421-430Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-6840 (URN)10.1016/j.jvsv.2014.12.002 (DOI)26992620 (PubMedID)23726 (Local ID)23726 (Archive number)23726 (OAI)
Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Methe, K., Bäckdahl, H., Johansson, B. R., Nayakawde, N., Dellgren, G. & Sumitran-Holgersson, S. (2014). An alternative approach to decellularize whole porcine heart (ed.). BioResearch Open Access, 3(6), 327-338
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An alternative approach to decellularize whole porcine heart
Show others...
2014 (English)In: BioResearch Open Access, ISSN 2164-7844, E-ISSN 2164-7860, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 327-338Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Scaffold characteristics are decisive for repopulating the acellular tissue with cells. A method to produce such a scaffold from intact organ requires a customized decellularization protocol. Here, we have decellularized whole, intact porcine hearts by serial perfusion and agitation of hypotonic solution, an ionic detergent (4% sodium deoxycholate), and a nonionic detergent (1% Triton X-100). The resultant matrix was characterized for its degree of decellularization, morphological and functional integrity. The protocol used resulted in extensive decellularization of the cardiac tissue, but the cytoskeletal elements (contractile apparatus) of cardiomyocytes remained largely unaffected by the procedure although their membranous organelles were completely absent. Further, several residual angiogenic growth factors were found to be present in the decellularized tissue.

Keywords
heart, ECM (extracellular matrix), growth factors, angiogenesis, vasculogenesis, An alternative approach to decellularize whole porcine heart
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-26330 (URN)10.1089/biores.2014.0046 (DOI)
Note

A3390

Available from: 2016-12-08 Created: 2016-12-08 Last updated: 2018-08-06Bibliographically approved
Olausson, M., Kuna, V. K., Travnikova, G., Bäckdahl, H., Patil, P. B., Saalman, R., . . . Sumitran-Holgersson, S. (2014). In vivo application of tissue-engineered veins using autologous peripheral whole blood: A proof of concept study (ed.). EBioMedicine, 1(1), 72-79
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In vivo application of tissue-engineered veins using autologous peripheral whole blood: A proof of concept study
Show others...
2014 (English)In: EBioMedicine, E-ISSN 2352-3964, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 72-79Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vascular diseases are increasing health problems affecting >25 million individuals in westernized societies. Such patients could benefit fromtransplantation of tissue-engineered vascular grafts using autologous cells. One challenge that has limited this development is the need for cell isolation, and risks associated with ex vivo expanded stem cells. Herewe demonstrate a novel approach to generate transplantable vascular grafts using decellularized allogeneic vascular scaffolds, repopulatedwith peripheralwhole blood (PWB) in vitro in a bioreactor. Circulating, VEGFR-2+/CD45+ and a smaller fraction of VEGFR-2+/CD14+ cells contributed to repopulation of the graft. SEMmicrographs showed flat cells on the luminal surface of the grafts consistentwith endothelial cells. For clinical validation, two autologous PWBtissue-engineered vein conduits were prepared and successfully used for bypass procedures in two pediatric patients. These results provide a proof of principle for the generation of transplantable vascular grafts using a simple autologous blood sample, making it clinically feasible globally.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-6697 (URN)10.1016/j.ebiom.2014.09.001 (DOI)2-s2.0-84921981114 (Scopus ID)23692 (Local ID)23692 (Archive number)23692 (OAI)
Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08 Last updated: 2019-08-14Bibliographically approved
Hellström, M., El-Akouri, R. R., Sihlbom, C., Olsson, B. M., Lengqvist, J., Bäckdahl, H., . . . Brännström, M. (2014). Towards the development of a bioengineered uterus: Comparison of different protocols for rat uterus decellularization (ed.). Acta Biomaterialia, 10(12), 5034-5042
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards the development of a bioengineered uterus: Comparison of different protocols for rat uterus decellularization
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Acta Biomaterialia, ISSN 1742-7061, E-ISSN 1878-7568, Vol. 10, no 12, p. 5034-5042Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Uterus transplantation (UTx) may be the only possible curative treatment for absolute uterine factor infertility, which affects 1 in every 500 females of fertile age. We recently presented the 6-month results from the first clinical UTx trial, describing nine live-donor procedures. This routine involves complicated surgery and requires potentially harmful immune suppression to prevent rejection. However, tissue engineering applications using biomaterials and stem cells may replace the need for a live donor, and could prevent the required immunosuppressive treatment. To investigate the basic aspects of this, we developed a novel whole-uterus scaffold design for uterus tissue engineering experiments in the rat. Decellularization was achieved by perfusion of detergents and ionic solutions. The remaining matrix and its biochemical and mechanical properties were quantitatively compared from using three different protocols. The constructs were further compared with native uterus tissue composition. Perfusion with Triton X-100/dimethyl sulfoxide/H2O led to a compact, weaker scaffold that showed evidence of a compromised matrix organization. Sodium deoxycholate/dH2O perfusion gave rise to a porous scaffold that structurally and mechanically resembled native uterus better. An innovative combination of two proteomic analyses revealed higher fibronectin and versican content in these porous scaffolds, which may explain the improved scaffold organization. Together with other important protocol-dependent differences, our results can contribute to the development of improved decellularization protocols for assorted organs. Furthermore, our study shows the first available data on decellularized whole uterus, and creates new opportunities for numerous in vitro and in vivo whole-uterus tissue engineering applications.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-6732 (URN)10.1016/j.actbio.2014.08.018 (DOI)2-s2.0-84926339534 (Scopus ID)23744 (Local ID)23744 (Archive number)23744 (OAI)
Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08 Last updated: 2019-08-15Bibliographically approved
Patil, P., Chougule, P., Kumar, V., Almström, S., Bäckdahl, H. & Banerjee, D. (2013). Recellularization of acellular human small intestine using bone-marrow stem cells (ed.). Stem Cells Translational Medicine, 2(4), 307-315
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recellularization of acellular human small intestine using bone-marrow stem cells
Show others...
2013 (English)In: Stem Cells Translational Medicine, ISSN 2157-6564, E-ISSN 2157-6580, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 307-315Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We aimed to produce an acellular human tissue scaffold with a view to test the possibility of recellularization with bone marrow stem cells to produce a tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI). Human small-bowel specimens (n = 5) were obtained from cadaveric organ donors and treated sequentially with 6% dimethyl sulfoxide in hypotonic buffer, 1% Triton X-100, and DNase. Each small intestine (SI) piece (6 cm) was recellularized with EPCAM+ and CD133+ allogeneic bone marrow stem cells. Histological and molecular analysis demonstrated that after decellularization, all cellular components and nuclear material were removed. Our analysis also showed that the decellularized human SI tissue retained its histoarchitecture with intact villi and major structural proteins. Protein films of common extracellular matrix constituents (collagen I, laminin, and fibronectin) were found in abundance. Furthermore, several residual angiogenic factors were found in the decellularized SI. Following recellularization, we found viable mucin-positive goblet cells, CK18+ epithelial cells in villi adjacent to a muscularis mucosa with α-actin+ smooth muscle cells, and a high repopulation of blood vessels with CD31+ endothelial cells. Our results show that in the future, such a TESI would be ideal for clinical purposes, because it can be derived from the recipient's own immunocompatible bone marrow cells, thus avoiding the use of immunosuppression.

Keywords
Recellularization of acellular human small intestine using bone-marrow stem cells
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-27491 (URN)10.5966/sctm.2012-0108 (DOI)
Note

A3088.

Available from: 2016-12-08 Created: 2016-12-08 Last updated: 2018-08-06Bibliographically approved
Malm, C.-J., Risberg, B., Bodin, A., Bäckdahl, H., Johansson, B. & Gatenholm, P. (2012). Small calibre biosynthetic bacterial cellulose blood vessels: 13-months patency in a sheep model (ed.). Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, 46(1), 57-62
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Small calibre biosynthetic bacterial cellulose blood vessels: 13-months patency in a sheep model
Show others...
2012 (English)In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 57-62Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Many patients in need of bypass surgery lack graft material and current synthetic alternatives have poor performance. A 4 mm vascular graft composed of bacterial cellulose (BC) was developed and tested in pilot study in a large animal model. DESIGN: BC is a biopolymer made by the bacteria acetobacter xylinum. BC grafts (n = 16) with 4 cm length and 4 mm internal diameter were implanted bilaterally in the carotid arteries of eight sheep. No long-term antithrombotic therapy was administered. Patency was assessed with ultrasound. Histology, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy were performed after explantation. RESULTS: Fifty percent of the grafts occluded within two weeks. One animal died with patent grafts after 14 days. In the three remaining animals 5/6 grafts were patent after nine months. Two animals were followed 13 months after implantation with 3/4 grafts patent at explantation. All patent grafts had confluent endothelial-like cells. CONCLUSIONS: Biosynthetic small calibre vascular grafts made from BC can be patent for up to 13 months in sheep carotid arteries. BC is a potential material for small calibre grafts but patency in animal models needs to be improved before clinical studies can be planned.

Keywords
Small calibre biosynthetic bacterial cellulose blood vessles: 13-months patency in a sheep model
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-27465 (URN)
Note

A3136

Available from: 2016-12-08 Created: 2016-12-08 Last updated: 2018-08-06Bibliographically approved
Bodin, A. & Bäckdahl, H. (2011). Bacterial Cellulose as Biomaterial. In: Comprehensive Biomaterials: Biologically Inspired and Biomolecular Materials (pp. 405-410). Elsevier
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bacterial Cellulose as Biomaterial
2011 (English)In: Comprehensive Biomaterials: Biologically Inspired and Biomolecular Materials, Elsevier, 2011, p. 405-410Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2011
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-831 (URN)10.1016/B978-0-08-055294-1.00080-5 (DOI)978-0-08-055294-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-08-24 Created: 2016-08-24 Last updated: 2018-08-06Bibliographically approved
Bäckdahl, H., Risberg, B. & Gatenholm, P. (2011). Observations on bacterial cellulose tube formation for application as vascular graft (ed.). Materials Science and Engineering, 31, 14-21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Observations on bacterial cellulose tube formation for application as vascular graft
2011 (English)In: Materials Science and Engineering, Vol. 31, p. 14-21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nanocellulose (bacterial cellulose, BC), such as that produced by Acetobacter xylinum, has shown promising results as a replacement material for small diameter vascular grafts. The surface morphology of the lumen and mechanical properties of such tubes are crucial for their performance. The growth of a BC tube in a vertical fermentation bioreactor using silicone tubing for support and as an oxygen delivery membrane has not been studied in detail previously. Oxygen concentration and the number of bacteria added influence the production of the BC tubes. A dense and smooth luminal surface was formed after 4 days on a 3 mm silicone support. The bacteria were found to be in high concentration close to the silicon support and decreased in number further away. In the region with a high bacteria concentration, dense thin layers of BC were formed since the bacteria moved close together in this region. The presented observations were summarized in a theoretical model of BC tube growth.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-6227 (URN)10.1016/j.msec.2010.07.010 (DOI)2-s2.0-78649629596 (Scopus ID)12628 (Local ID)12628 (Archive number)12628 (OAI)
Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
Andersson, J., Stenhamre, H., Bäckdahl, H. & Gatenholm, P. (2010). Behaviour of human chondrocytes in engineered porous bacterial cellulose scaffolds. J Biomed Mater Res: Part A. 94A (ed.). J Biomed Mater Res: Part A., 94A(4), 1124-1132
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behaviour of human chondrocytes in engineered porous bacterial cellulose scaffolds. J Biomed Mater Res: Part A. 94A
2010 (English)In: J Biomed Mater Res: Part A., Vol. 94A, no 4, p. 1124-1132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-6200 (URN)13104 (Local ID)13104 (Archive number)13104 (OAI)
Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08 Last updated: 2018-08-06Bibliographically approved
Zaborowska, M., Bodin, A., Bäckdahl, H., Popp, J., Goldstein, A. & Gatenholm, P. (2010). Microporous bacterial cellulose as a potential scaffold for bone regeneration (ed.). Acta Biomater, 6(7), 233939
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microporous bacterial cellulose as a potential scaffold for bone regeneration
Show others...
2010 (English)In: Acta Biomater, Vol. 6, no 7, p. 233939-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Microporous bacterial cellulose as a potential scaffold for bone regeneration. Acta Biomater. Jul;6(7):2540-7, 2010

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-6201 (URN)13105 (Local ID)13105 (Archive number)13105 (OAI)
Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08 Last updated: 2018-08-06Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1936-6515

Search in DiVA

Show all publications
v. 2.35.7