Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 32) Show all publications
Xue, L., Prass, N., Gollnow, S., Davis, J., Scherhaufer, S., Östergren, K., . . . Liu, G. (2019). Efficiency and Carbon Footprint of the German Meat Supply Chain. Environmental Science and Technology, 53(9), 5133-5142
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Efficiency and Carbon Footprint of the German Meat Supply Chain
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 53, no 9, p. 5133-5142Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Meat production and consumption contribute significantly to environmental impacts such as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. These emissions can be reduced via various strategies ranging from production efficiency improvement to process optimization, food waste reduction, trade pattern change, and diet structure change. On the basis of a material flow analysis approach, we mapped the dry matter mass and energy balance of the meat (including beef, pork, and poultry) supply chain in Germany and discussed the emission reduction potential of different mitigation strategies in an integrated and mass-balance consistent framework. Our results reaffirmed the low energy conversion efficiency of the meat supply chain (among which beef was the least efficient) and the high GHG emissions at the meat production stage. While diet structure change (either reducing the meat consumption or substituting meat by edible offal) showed the highest emissions reduction potential, eliminating meat waste in retailing and consumption and byproducts generation in slaughtering and processing were found to have profound effect on emissions reduction as well. The rendering of meat byproducts and waste treatment were modeled in detail, adding up to a net environmental benefit of about 5% of the entire supply chain GHG emissions. The combined effects based on assumed high levels of changes of important mitigation strategies, in a rank order considering the level of difficulty of implementation, showed that the total emission could be reduced by 43% comparing to the current level, implying a tremendous opportunity for sustainably feeding the planet by 2050.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society, 2019
Keywords
Carbon footprint, Conversion efficiency, Emission control, Gas emissions, Meats, Optimization, Supply chains, Waste treatment, Emission reduction potentials, Emissions reduction, Environmental benefits, Level of difficulties, Mass and energy balance, Material flow analysis, Mitigation strategy, Production efficiency, Greenhouse gases, article, diet, energy conversion, feeding, human, waste management
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-38685 (URN)10.1021/acs.est.8b06079 (DOI)2-s2.0-85064858412 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-10 Created: 2019-05-10 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Corrado, S., Caldeira, C., Eriksson, M., Hanssen, O., Hauser, H., van Holsteijn, F., . . . Sala, S. (2019). Food waste accounting methodologies: Challenges, opportunities, and further advancements. Global Food Security, 20, 93-100
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Food waste accounting methodologies: Challenges, opportunities, and further advancements
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Global Food Security, ISSN 2211-9124, Vol. 20, p. 93-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

About one third of the food produced globally is wasted along the food chain, representing a burden for the environment and an inefficiency of the food system. Tackling food waste is a priority on the global political agenda to guarantee food security. Defining a methodology for food waste quantification is key to monitoring progress towards the achievement of reduction targets. This paper summarises the outcomes of a workshop on food waste accounting co-organised by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre and Directorate-General on Health and Food Safety with the aim of stimulating harmonisation of methodologies, identifying challenges, opportunities, and further advancement for food waste accounting. The paper presents methodological aspects, e.g. system boundaries, reliability of data, accounting of water flows, to ensure better support to food waste policy design and interventions. It addresses all the actors of the food supply chain, governments, and research institutions. © 2019 The Authors

Keywords
Accounting methodology, Food loss, Food waste, Policy support, Sustainable development goal 12.3, Systemic approach
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-37745 (URN)10.1016/j.gfs.2019.01.002 (DOI)2-s2.0-85060529633 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Joint Research Centre, JRC, https://ec.europa.eu/knowledge4policy/projects-activities/jrc-biomass-assessment-study_en; Funding details: European Commission, EC; Funding details: https://ec.europa.eu/knowledge4policy/bioeconomy_en; Funding text 1: This publication is part of European Commission's Joint Research Centre contribution to the European Commission's Knowledge Centre for Bioeconomy ( https://ec.europa.eu/knowledge4policy/bioeconomy_en ). The workshop “FW accounting: methodologies, challenges and opportunities” was organised in the context of the Institutional JRC Biomass Study (further details at https://ec.europa.eu/knowledge4policy/projects-activities/jrc-biomass-assessment-study_en ). The European Commission's Joint Research Centre would like to thank the workshop participants for their fruitful contributions to the discussion. The authors wish to thank Grainne Mulhern for her support in the editing of the paper.

Available from: 2019-02-11 Created: 2019-02-11 Last updated: 2019-02-11Bibliographically approved
Sonesson, U. & Östergren, K. (2019). Underlag till Färdplan för en väsentligt mer hållbar livsmedelskedja.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Underlag till Färdplan för en väsentligt mer hållbar livsmedelskedja
2019 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Syftet med rapporten är att skapa ett underlag för mer operativa, eller konkreta, hållbarhetsmål för aktörerna i livsmedelskedjan. Dessa mål ska i möjligaste mån vara kopplade till kvantifieringar av en hållbar nivå för resursförbrukning och miljöpåverkan globalt.

Rapporten beskriver en process som startar med att identifiera de relevanta hållbarhetsaspekterna för livsmedelsystemet och baserat på litteratur kvantifiera dessa på global nivå, nedbrutet till en globalt hållbar nivå per capita. Som ett komplement till det globala användes också nationella källor för de miljömål som är av mer regional karaktär. Livsmedelssektorns hållbarhetsprestanda är en kombination av konsumtionsmönster och hur effektiva och hållbara produktionssystemen är. Då rapporten syftade till att ge underlag för konkreta mål för alla aktörer i systemet skapades två typer av mål, en typ som berör konsumtionsmönster och en typ som berör produktionskedjornas hållbarhetsprestanda. För att de totala hållbarhetsmålen ska nås måste både konsumtionen och produktionen förändras, och med hjälp av dessa två mål kan båda aspekterna hanteras i samma ramverk. Om produktionssystemen inte förbättrar sin hållbarhetsprestanda krävs större förändringar i konsumtionen och vice versa.

De mål som sätts för försäljning/tillhandahållning till konsument i rapporten är avsedda att användas av aktörer som säljer eller på annat sätt har möjlighet att påverka konsumtionsmönster, som exempelvis handel, food service och den offentliga måltidssektorn. Dessa mål ger en bild av faktisk slutkonsumtion. De mål som sätts för produktionen, alltså produktionens värdekedjor, är avsedda att användas av aktörer som producerar livsmedel, alltså lantbruk och livsmedelsindustri.

Det var inte möjligt att sätta kvantitativa mål för alla relevanta hållbarhetsaspekter, för vissa aspekter finns inga vetenskapliga uppskattningar av den hållbara nivån för påverkan. Brist på metodik och data är ett annat allvarligt hinder för att sätta operativa mål. I rapporten har dessa kunskapsluckor identifierats och alternativa mål har föreslagits för att alla aspekter ska kunna hanteras konkret. Med alternativa mål menas mål som kan bygga på indirekta mått på hållbarhet som exempelvis energibesparingsmål istället för ett mål om hur stor den totala energianvändningen kan vara, då detta inte finns kvantifierat.

Publisher
p. 36
Series
RISE Rapport ; 2019:20
Keywords
Hållbara livsmedelssystem, Mat, Livsmedel, Planetära gränser
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-38872 (URN)978-91-88907-46-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-05-22 Created: 2019-05-22 Last updated: 2019-05-22Bibliographically approved
Woodhouse, A., Davis, J., Pénicaud, C. & Östergren, K. (2018). Sustainability checklist in support of the design of food processing. Sustainable Production and Consumption, 16, 110-120
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainability checklist in support of the design of food processing
2018 (English)In: Sustainable Production and Consumption, ISSN 2352-5509, E-ISSN 1614-2373, Vol. 16, p. 110-120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To source food ingredients produced by best practice, reducing food loss in the processing line and implementation of new technologies are some examples of changes in the management in the food and drink sector that may offer advantages from a sustainability perspective. There are several tools and methods for evaluating sustainability for a food processing technology but often specific methodological knowledge is essential and many companies may not be able to carry out such a study due to time constraints and lack of data. The aim of this paper is to provide a tool with the format of a qualitative sustainability checklist, based on existing Life Cycle Assessment theory. The checklist is devoted to the design and adaptation of processing in the food industry to clarify the potential hot spots in new process design and is focused on environmental sustainability, although other aspects were conferred as well to demonstrate its potential. To identify the potential of this kind of checklist, it was tested by four food companies. The participant feedback was in general positive. The companies highlighted the benefits of creating awareness of sustainability issues within the company and providing a good overview without data collection. From a scientific point of view, the approach can help to overcome several challenges in sustainability assessment in the agri-food sector, especially some modeling issues and spatio-temporal resolution. © 2018 The Authors

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-34362 (URN)10.1016/j.spc.2018.06.008 (DOI)2-s2.0-85049469690 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: EC, European Commission; Funding details: 245280; Funding details: 267196, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme; Funding details: 635759;  the European Commission ( FUTUREFOOD H2020 Grant Agreement 635759 and PRESERF FP7 Grant Agreement 245280 ).

Available from: 2018-08-07 Created: 2018-08-07 Last updated: 2019-02-05Bibliographically approved
Krewer, C., Davis, J., Woodhouse, A., Östergren, K. & Holtz, E. (2017). Early phase design tool for non-LCA experts: Integrating environmental assessment in the development of novel processing technology in food industry. In: : . Paper presented at Life Cycle Management Conference 2017 September 3 - 6, 2017 Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early phase design tool for non-LCA experts: Integrating environmental assessment in the development of novel processing technology in food industry
Show others...
2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The Life Cycle Assessment methodology often applies a product perspective but can be used to assess novel production technologies by comparing novel products with a baseline product, as long as the functional unit of the product is considered to be the same. There is increasing environmental concerns in society and pressures on industry to take into account their impact on the environment. Tools are available for this, but not tools adapted to specific industry needs. The reasons to use LCA are foremost to guide the development towards the most sustainable solutions and to evaluate the market potential from an environmental perspective. Challenges arise when applying LCA in early development stages, e.g. getting access to recent development data, to increase commitment and incentives to take early LCA results into consideration, to present results in an attractive way etc. LCA calculations must also keep up with the sometimes rapid development. In order to meet these challenges interactive report software have been introduced to industrial partners (non-LCA experts) in an EU project called FutureFood (Grant agreement no: 635759). The project goal is to develop a new processing technology for foods (CO2 drying). In order to meet the LCA related challenges a platform has been used that is developed by PRé Consultants (Pre, 2016?), called Share and Collect. It allows LCA experts to develop tools for non-experts so that users are able to alter parameters in the LCA model and assess the result of the changes. It is done by providing the industrial partners with an intuitive web based graphical user interface (GUI). When a user changes input data in the GUI, parameter values also change in the model, an LCA calculation engine runs the model and the GUI presents the corresponding results. In the project a tool for assessing the processing technology has been developed and the industrial partners  are provided rights to access the tools and create ‘what if’ scenarios. Examples of changes are change of electricity production, transport distances, transport types or modes, raw material source, packaging, production resource or energy efficiency etc. The tool has been evaluated by the non-LCA expert industrial partners, and the first review results show that it is user friendly, visually appealing and interesting in its interactive way because of the instant feedback of results. Tailored models such as the ones developed in the project have the potential to support knowledge based decisions in innovation projects in companies.

Keywords
LCA, foods, FutureFood, drying, tool
National Category
Other Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-32407 (URN)
Conference
Life Cycle Management Conference 2017 September 3 - 6, 2017 Luxembourg, Luxembourg
Projects
FutureFood
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020
Available from: 2017-10-30 Created: 2017-10-30 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Canali, M., Amani, P., Aramyan, L., Gheoldus, M., Moates, G., Östergren, K., . . . Vittuari, M. (2017). Food Waste Drivers in Europe, from Identification to Possible Interventions. Sustainability, 9, Article ID 37.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Food Waste Drivers in Europe, from Identification to Possible Interventions
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, article id 37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The growing volumes of food globally lost or wasted and implications for food security and sustainability have raised the concern of researchers, governments, international organizations and grass-root movements. Much research and experiences investigating food waste causes and drivers focus on one specific segment of the food supply chain and limit the analysis to the situation of one or few countries, while the few studies of wider geographical scope also target other relevant and diversified objectives (e.g., food waste definition, quantification, environmental and economic impacts, and recommendations for interventions). This study, carried out by a network of European institutions involved in research and initiatives against food waste, focuses on the analysis of a broad area, Europe, through a wide and systematic literature review and consultation with stakeholders in international focus groups. The food supply chain was divided into seven segments and three main contexts were defined for the examination of food waste sources: Technological, Institutional (related to organisational factors, i.e., business management, economy, legislation, and policy), and Social (related to consumers’ behaviours and lifestyles). Results suggest a wide and multifaceted problem, interconnected across all stages of the food supply chain, from primary production, to final consumption. Within each context, the identified drivers have been grouped according to the possibilities and the type of interventions for food waste reduction. A final cross-contextual prioritization distinguished food waste sources related to (A) inherent characteristics of food; (B) social and economic factors; (C) individual non-readily changeable behaviours; (D) other priorities targeted by private and public stakeholders; (E) diversified factors, such as mismanagement, inefficient legislation, lack of awareness or information; and sub-optimal use of available technologies, which could be more promptly changed. Such diversification of causes calls for specific monitoring systems, targeted policy measures, and actions of individual stakeholders at each stage of the food supply chain.

Keywords
food waste, food waste drivers, food sustainability, food policy
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-27739 (URN)10.3390/su9010037 (DOI)2-s2.0-85011045300 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-01-03 Created: 2017-01-03 Last updated: 2019-01-04Bibliographically approved
Davis, J., De Menna, F., Unger, N., Östergren, K., Loubiere, M. & Vittuari, M. (2017). Generic strategy LCA and LCC: Guidance for LCA and LCC focused on prevention, valorisation and treatment of side flows from the food supply chain.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Generic strategy LCA and LCC: Guidance for LCA and LCC focused on prevention, valorisation and treatment of side flows from the food supply chain
Show others...
2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Urged by the importance of resource efficiency and circular economy agenda of EU and national policy makers, many stakeholders are seeking alternatives for current surplus food or side flows within the food supply chain. Any new valorisation route for side flows (i.e. not the main product) will be associated with impacts (monetary and environmental). To allow informed decision making at all levels, from individual stakeholder to policy level, robust, consistent and science based approaches are required. The EU H2020 funded project REFRESH (Resource Efficient Food and dRink for the Entire Supply cHain) aims to contribute to food waste reduction throughout the food supply chain, and evaluate the environmental impacts and life cycle costs.

Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) and Life Cycle Costing (LCC) are well documented and generic approaches for assessing the environmental and cost dimensions of a system. Both LCA and LCC are characterised by allowing for a large flexibility in system scoping. To allow for comparison between different options consistent approaches are required. Furthermore, there is a need to bridge the gap between assessors who might have a deep knowledge of the systems they are assessing, but are not in depth method experts on LCA or LCC. Highlighting challenging methodological aspects and encouraging the practitioner to ask the most relevant questions contributes to a better scoping practice of LCA and LCCs.

The objective of this study was to develop a consistent approach, combining LCA and LCA specifically to assess impacts of prevention of resource inefficiencies, valorisation routes and waste handling in the food supply chain. The recommendations build on existing standards and state-of-the-art LCA/LCC research, and provide guidance on how to overcome specific methodological challenges. They focus particularly on the goal and scope stage of an LCA and Environmental LCC and on side flows from the food supply chain.

To categorise systems in order to be assessed, the concept of “REFRESH situations” (RS) has been developed (De Mena et al., 2016; Unger et al., 2016). The four REFRESH situations (RS) are: Prevention of side flow (RS 1), side flow valorisation (RS 2), valorisation as part of waste management (RS 3), and end-of-life treatment (RS 4). The REFRESH situations can take place at any point/process in the life cycle, within the remit of any stakeholder (including consumers) and are independent of the perspective taken, i.e. of the producer of side stream or the receiver. For each REFRESH situation, specific recommendations on setting of system boundary, functional unit(s) and handling of multi-functionality in relation to the stated problem are provided (beside some other aspects). The importance to differentiate between attributional and consequential approaches is discussed in detail. This consistent approach contributes towards more harmonised use of LCA and LCC for informed decision for handling side flows in the food supply chain.

The focus of the specific recommendations given in this report is primarily on change-oriented studies on interventions for side flows since foot print studies are to a higher degree covered in existing frameworks such as the ILCD-handbook and the PEF framework under development.

Publisher
p. 111
Series
SP Rapport, ISSN 0284-5172 ; 2017:01
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-27973 (URN)978-91-88349-84-2 (ISBN)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 641933
Note

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 641933. Project coordination and editing provided by SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.

Reproduction and translation for non-commercial purposes are authorised, provided the source is acknowledged and the publisher is given prior notice and sent a copy.

Available from: 2017-02-02 Created: 2017-02-02 Last updated: 2019-01-04Bibliographically approved
Xue, L., Liu, G., Parfitt, J., Liu, X., Van Herpen, E., Stenmarck, Å., . . . Cheng, S. (2017). Missing Food, Missing Data?: A Critical Review of Global Food Losses and Food Waste Data. Environmental Science and Technology, 51(12), 6618-6633
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Missing Food, Missing Data?: A Critical Review of Global Food Losses and Food Waste Data
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 51, no 12, p. 6618-6633Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Food losses and food waste (FLW) have become a global concern in recent years and emerge as a priority in the global and national political agenda (e.g., with Target 12.3 in the new United Nations Sustainable Development Goals). A good understanding of the availability and quality of global FLW data is a prerequisite for tracking progress on reduction targets, analyzing environmental impacts, and exploring mitigation strategies for FLW. There has been a growing body of literature on FLW quantification in the past years; however, significant challenges remain, such as data inconsistency and a narrow temporal, geographical, and food supply chain coverage. In this paper, we examined 202 publications which reported FLW data for 84 countries and 52 individual years from 1933 to 2014. We found that most existing publications are conducted for a few industrialized countries (e.g., the United Kingdom and the United States), and over half of them are based only on secondary data, which signals high uncertainties in the existing global FLW database. Despite these uncertainties, existing data indicate that per-capita food waste in the household increases with an increase of per-capita GDP. We believe that more consistent, in-depth, and primary-data-based studies, especially for emerging economies, are badly needed to better inform relevant policy on FLW reduction and environmental impacts mitigation.

Keywords
Food supply, Supply chains, Sustainable development, Critical review, Data inconsistencies, Emerging economies, Industrialized countries, Mitigation strategy, Political agenda, Reduction targets, Secondary datum, Environmental impact
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-30872 (URN)10.1021/acs.est.7b00401 (DOI)2-s2.0-85021643135 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: 71233007, NSFC, National Natural Science Foundation of China; Funding text: This work is funded by National Natural Science Foundation of China (key program, project no. 71233007), National Key Research and Development Plan of China (project no. 2016YFE0113100), and the Danish Agency for Science, Technology and Innovation (International Network Programme, reference nos. 5132-00029B and 6144-00036). We thank Yao Liu for research assistance.

Available from: 2017-09-06 Created: 2017-09-06 Last updated: 2019-02-05Bibliographically approved
Sonesson, U. G., Lorentzon, K., Andersson, A., Barr, U.-K., Bertilsson, J., Borch, E., . . . Wall, H. (2016). Paths to a sustainable food sector: integrated design and LCA of future food supply chains: the case of pork production in Sweden. The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 21(5), 664-676
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Paths to a sustainable food sector: integrated design and LCA of future food supply chains: the case of pork production in Sweden
Show others...
2016 (English)In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, ISSN 0948-3349, E-ISSN 1614-7502, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 664-676Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To describe a more sustainable food sector, a supply chain approach is needed. Changing a supply chain inevitably means that various attributes of the product and its system will change. This project assumed this challenge and delivered detailed descriptions, life cycle assessment (LCA) evaluations, and consequence assessments of the supply chains of six commodities, i.e., milk, cheese, beef, pork, chicken, and bread, from a Swedish region. This paper presents results for the pork supply chain. Methods: In the project setup, experts on production along supply chains designed three scenarios for environmentally improved systems. These scenarios, i.e., the ecosystem, plant nutrients, and climate scenarios, were intended to address different clusters of environmental goals. The next step was to challenge these scenarios by considering their possible consequences for products and systems from the food safety, sensory quality, animal welfare, consumer appreciation, and (for primary production only) cost perspectives. This led to changes in production system design to prevent negative consequences. The final supply chains were quantified using LCA and were again assessed from the three perspectives. Results and discussion: The scenario design approach worked well, thoroughly and credibly describing the production systems. Assessment of consequences bolstered the credibility and quality of the systems and results. The LCA of pig production and smoked ham identified large potentials for improvement by implementing available knowledge: global warming potential (GWP) could be reduced 21–54 % and marine eutrophication by 14–45 %. The main reason for these improvements was improved productivity (approaching the best producers’ current performance), though dedicated measures were also important, resulting in increased nitrogen efficiency, more varied crop rotations for crop production and better production management, and improved animal health and manure management for animal production. Reduced post-farm wastage contributed as did reduced emissions from fertilizer production. Conclusions: The working approach applied was successful in integrating LCA research with food system production expertise to deliver results relevant to supply chain decision-makers. The consequence assessments brought considerable value to the project, giving its results greater credibility. By introducing constraints in the form of “no negative consequences and no increased costs,” the work was “guided” so that the scenario design avoided being hampered by too many opportunities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Ferlag, 2016
Keywords
Consequence assessment, Environment, Food system scenarios, Future food production, LCA, Sustainable food chains
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-330 (URN)10.1007/s11367-015-0969-5 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-06-17 Created: 2016-06-17 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Bertilsson, J., Barr, U., Borch, E., Normann, A., Nielsen, T., Gunnarsson, S., . . . Östergren, K. (2014). Hållbara matvägar – referens- och lösningsscenarier för mjölkproduktion och framställning av konsumtionsmjölk och lagrad ost.. Göteborg, Sverige: SIK Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hållbara matvägar – referens- och lösningsscenarier för mjölkproduktion och framställning av konsumtionsmjölk och lagrad ost.
Show others...
2014 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg, Sverige: SIK Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik, 2014
Series
SIK Rapport, ISSN 0436-2071 ; 886
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-606 (URN)
Funder
VINNOVA, 2011-03764
Available from: 2016-06-29 Created: 2016-06-29 Last updated: 2018-08-22Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8038-1365

Search in DiVA

Show all publications
v. 2.35.7