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Ziegler, F., Eigaard, O., Parker, R., Tyedmers, P., Hognes, E. & Jafarzadeh, S. (2019). Adding perspectives to: “Global trends in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fuel combustion in marine fisheries from 1950 - 2016". Marine Policy, 107, Article ID 103488.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adding perspectives to: “Global trends in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fuel combustion in marine fisheries from 1950 - 2016"
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2019 (English)In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 107, article id 103488Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A contribution in this issue, Greer et al. (2019), models carbon dioxide emissions from fuel combustion in global fisheries. This is done based on a method using data on fishing effort, presenting results for two sectors: small-scale and industrial fisheries. The selection of these sectors is not motivated in relation to studying fuel use, and it is well-documented that other factors more accurately predict fuel use of fisheries and would constitute a more useful basis for defining sub-sectors, when the goal of the study is to investigate fuel use. Weakly grounded assumptions made in the translation of fishing effort into carbon dioxide emissions (e.g. the engine run time per fishing day for each sector) systematically bias results towards overestimating fuel use of “industrial” vessels, underestimating that of “small-scale”. A sensitivity analysis should have been a minimum requirement for publication. To illustrate how the approach used by Greer et al. (2019) systematically misrepresents the fuel use and emissions of the two sectors, the model is applied to Australian and New Zealand rock lobster trap fisheries and compared to observed fuel use. It is demonstrated how the approach underestimates emissions of small-scale fisheries, while overestimating emissions of industrial fisheries. As global fisheries are dominated by industrial fisheries, the aggregate emission estimate is likely considerably overestimated. Effort-based approaches can be valuable to model fuel use of fisheries in data-poor situations, but should be seen as complementary to estimates based on direct data, which they can also help to validate. Whenever used, they should be based on transparent, science-based data and assumptions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Carbon dioxide, Fisheries, Fuel efficiency, Fuel intensity, Fuel use, Greenhouse gas emissions
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-39727 (URN)10.1016/j.marpol.2019.03.001 (DOI)2-s2.0-85070112108 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-08-15Bibliographically approved
Hallström, E., Bergman, K., Mifflin, K., Parker, R., Tyedmers, P., Troell, M. & Ziegler, F. (2019). Combined climate and nutritional performance of seafoods. Journal of Cleaner Production, 230, 402-411
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Combined climate and nutritional performance of seafoods
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 230, p. 402-411Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

National authorities in many countries advise their populations to eat more seafood, for health and sometimes for environmental purposes, but give little guidance as to what type of seafood should be consumed. The large diversity in species and production methods results in variability both in the nutritional content and in the environmental performance of seafoods. More targeted dietary advice for sustainable seafood consumption requires a better understanding of the relative nutritional benefits against environmental costs of various types of seafood. This study analyzes the combined climate and nutritional performance of seafood commonly consumed in Sweden, originating all over the world. Nutrient density scores, assessed by seven alternative methods, are combined with species- technology- and origin-specific greenhouse gas emission data for 37 types of seafood. An integrated score indicates which seafood products provide the greatest nutritional value at the lowest climate costs and hence should be promoted from this perspective. Results show that seafoods consumed in Sweden differ widely in nutritional value as well as climate impact and that the two measures are not correlated across all species. Dietary changes towards increased consumption of more seafood choices where a correlation exists (e.g. pelagic species like sprat, herring and mackerel)would benefit both health and climate. Seafoods with a higher climate impact in relation to their nutritional value (e.g. shrimp, Pangasius and plaice)should, on the other hand, not be promoted in dietary advice. The effect of individual nutrients and implications of different nutrient density scores is evaluated. This research is a first step towards modelling the joint nutritional and climate benefits of seafood as a concrete baseline for policy-making, e.g. in dietary advice. It should be followed up by modelling other species, including environmental toxins in seafood in the nutrition score, and expanding to cover other environmental aspects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Climate, Dietary advice, Greenhouse gas emissions, Life cycle assessment, Nutrient density, Nutrition, Seafood, Environmental management, Gas emissions, Greenhouse gases, Life cycle, Meats, Nutrients, Environmental aspects, Environmental performance, Environmental toxins, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Nutritional benefits
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-38955 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2019.04.229 (DOI)2-s2.0-85066046781 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Svenska Forskningsrådet Formas, 2017-02021, 2016-00227; Funding text 1: The Swedish Research Council Formas is gratefully acknowledged for funding this study (Grant numbers 2016-00227 and 2017-02021 ).

Available from: 2019-06-10 Created: 2019-06-10 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Philis, G., Ziegler, F., Gansel, L., Jansen, M., Gracey, E. & Stene, A. (2019). Comparing life cycle assessment (LCA) of salmonid aquaculture production systems: Status and perspectives. Sustainability, 11(9), Article ID 2517.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparing life cycle assessment (LCA) of salmonid aquaculture production systems: Status and perspectives
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2019 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 9, article id 2517Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aquaculture is the fastest growing food sector worldwide, mostly driven by a steadily increasing protein demand. In response to growing ecological concerns, life cycle assessment (LCA) emerged as a key environmental tool to measure the impacts of various production systems, including aquaculture. In this review, we focused on farmed salmonids to perform an in-depth analysis, investigating methodologies and comparing results of LCA studies of this finfish family in relation to species and production technologies. Identifying the environmental strengths and weaknesses of salmonid production technologies is central to ensure that industrial actors and policymakers make informed choices to take the production of this important marine livestock to a more sustainable path. Three critical aspects of salmonid LCAs were studied based on 24 articles and reports: (1) Methodological application, (2) construction of inventories, and (3) comparison of production technologies across studies. Our first assessment provides an overview and compares important methodological choices. The second analysis maps the main foreground and background data sources, as well as the state of process inclusion and exclusion. In the third section, a first attempt to compare life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) and feed conversion ratio (FCR) data across production technologies was conducted using a single factor statistical protocol. Overall, findings suggested a lack of methodological completeness and reporting in the literature and demonstrated that inventories suffered from incomplete description and partial disclosure. Our attempt to compare LCA results across studies was challenging due to confounding factors and poor data availability, but useful as a first step in highlighting the importance of production technology for salmonids. In groups where the data was robust enough for statistical comparison, both differences and mean equalities were identified, allowing ranking of technology clusters based on their average scores. We statistically demonstrated that sea-based systems outperform land-based technology in terms of energy demand and that sea-based systems have a generally higher FCR than land-based ones. Cross-study analytics also strongly suggest that open systems generate on average more eutrophying emissions than closed designs. We further discuss how to overcome bottlenecks currently hampering such LCA meta-analysis. Arguments are made in favor of further developing cross-study LCA analysis, particularly by increasing the number of salmonid LCA available (to improve sample sizes) and by reforming in-depth LCA practices to enable full reproducibility and greater access to inventory data. © 2019 by the authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2019
Keywords
Aquaculture, Cross-study comparison, Environmental impacts, LCA, Life cycle assessment, Production systems, Review, Salmon, Trout, Salmonidae
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-39052 (URN)10.3390/su11092517 (DOI)2-s2.0-85066940958 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-06-26 Created: 2019-06-26 Last updated: 2019-06-26Bibliographically approved
Bergman, K. & Ziegler, F. (2019). Environmental impacts of alternative antifouling methods and use patterns of leisure boat owners. The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 24(4), 725-734
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental impacts of alternative antifouling methods and use patterns of leisure boat owners
2019 (English)In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, ISSN 0948-3349, E-ISSN 1614-7502, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 725-734Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Leisure boaters in the Baltic Sea apply more copper as antifoulant than needed and permitted. Initiatives have been started to identify efficient means making boat owners comply with regulations through changed consumer behavior. We compare the environmental impacts of conventional and alternative antifouling methods, using Life Cycle Assessment methodology. Methods: Two non-toxic methods were compared with biocide paint. To study the influence of boat owner use patterns, paint and brush washer scenarios (e.g., different paints, amounts, and maintenance) were created based on current use and recommendations. The functional unit was an average Swedish leisure boat kept fouling free for 1 year and impact categories studied were freshwater eco-toxicity and greenhouse gas emissions. Production of paints, fuel, electricity, and material used in the non-toxic methods was included. Sensitivity analysis was performed regarding the characterization method for toxicity, the fuel consumption data, and the copper release data. Results and discussion: The non-toxic methods, hull cover and brush washer, performed best, but a trade-off was identified when the brush washer was located further away from the home port, when additional transportation increased greenhouse gas emissions. The resources needed for the non-toxic methods (production of materials and electricity used) cause considerably lower toxic emissions than paint. In the paint scenarios, using less paint and cleaning the boat over a washing pad with water treatment reduces aquatic emissions significantly. Fuel-related emissions were consistently lower than paint-related emissions. In the best-performing paint scenario, fuel- and paint-related emissions represented 26 and 67% of total emissions, respectively. Conclusions: The non-toxic methods hull cover and brush washers lead to lower emissions, especially when brush washers were located close to the home port. Lacking such infrastructure, “painting less” is a way to reduce emissions, by using lower amounts of paint and painting less frequently. More widespread use of these antifouling strategies would considerably reduce copper emissions from leisure boating to the Baltic Sea. We suggest that support to marinas for investments in brush washers and washing pads should be further developed to enable boat owners to choose more sustainable antifouling methods and that information campaigns on the combined economic, health, and ecosystem impacts of antifouling are especially designed for boaters, marinas, market actors, and policy makers for a change to take place towards more sustainable practices.

Keywords
Antifouling, Baltic Sea, Boating, Copper, Environmental impacts, LCA, Leisure boats, Zinc
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-35889 (URN)10.1007/s11367-018-1525-x (DOI)2-s2.0-85053442777 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-06 Created: 2018-11-06 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Hornborg, S., Hallström, E., Ziegler, F., Bergman, K., Troell, M., Jonell, M., . . . Henriksson, P. (2019). Frisk med fisk utan risk?: Betydelsen av svensk konsumtion av sjömat för hälsa och miljö.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Frisk med fisk utan risk?: Betydelsen av svensk konsumtion av sjömat för hälsa och miljö
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2019 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Alternative title[en]
The importance of Swedish seafood consumption for health and environment
Abstract [en]

Seafood is a diverse food commodity, comprising of over 2 500 species from capture fisheries and over 600 species from farming, with vast differences between production methods. Dietary advice often includes recommendations to increase consumption of seafood, based on health benefits and that seafood may be produced with less environmental impacts and resources use compared to many other animal-based foods. However, at the same time, there are frequent media alarms related to potential health risks (some species have diet restrictions) and destructive production practices from both fisheries and aquaculture. As a result, there is often confusion on which seafood to eat or not to eat.The aim of this report is primarily to collate available information on health risks and benefits of Swedish seafood consumption, and to combine this with environmental aspects (focus on carbon footprint).Around 40 seafood products consumed in Sweden were included in the analysis. Potential health risks could only be included qualitatively, since the collected data is risk-based and thus not all products are sampled. It was found that the nutritional content and carbon footprint vastly differ between species. There were also several data gaps identified, such as the need for more detailed data on performance from different production systems. The combined assessment of nutritional value and carbon footprint categorised some species as win-win in terms of nutritional content and environmental pressures (such as small pelagic fish), while others could be more categorised as having less nutritional value and with high environmental costs (such as Northern prawn) respectively.The report provides decision support for further data collection needed to enable combined assessment of nutritional risks, benefits and environmental sustainability of seafood products. Results may be used to discuss suitable level of details of dietary advice.

Publisher
p. 65
Series
RISE Rapport ; 2019:38
Keywords
sustainable nutrition, seafood, aquaculture, fisheries, health, toxins
National Category
Agricultural Science, Forestry and Fisheries Fish and Aquacultural Science Nutrition and Dietetics Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-38331 (URN)978-91-88907-65-3 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Note

Den här rapporten är ett gemensamt initiativ från två forskningsprojekt finansierade inom ramen för Forskningsrådet för miljö, areella näringar och samhällsbyggande (Formas) satsning på livsmedelsforskning: projektet SeaWin som syftar till att identifiera vad hållbart ökande av produktion och konsumtion av sjömat i Sverige innebär ur ett miljöperspektiv (pågår 2016-2021) och det ettåriga projektet "Syntes av miljö- och nutritionsdata för sjömat- en bas för optimering av framtida dieter för hälsa och hållbarhet" som avslutas 2019 (och som skapades just för att möta kunskapsbristen om sjömats kombinerade näringsinnehåll och klimatpåverkan).

Available from: 2019-04-15 Created: 2019-04-15 Last updated: 2019-04-18Bibliographically approved
Tlusty, M., Tyedmers, P., Bailey, M., Ziegler, F., Henriksson, P., Béné, C., . . . Jonell, M. (2019). Reframing the sustainable seafood narrative. Global Environmental Change, 59, Article ID 101991.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reframing the sustainable seafood narrative
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2019 (English)In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 59, article id 101991Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The dominant sustainable seafood narrative is one where developed world markets catalyze practice improvements by fisheries and aquaculture producers that enhance ocean health. The narrow framing of seafood sustainability in terms of aquaculture or fisheries management and ocean health has contributed to the omission of these important food production systems from the discussion on global food system sustainability. This omission is problematic. Seafood makes critical contributions to food and nutrition security, particularly in low income countries, and is often a more sustainable and nutrient rich source of animal sourced-food than terrestrial meat production. We argue that to maximize the positive contributions that seafood can make to sustainable food systems, the conventional narratives that prioritize seafood's role in promoting ‘ocean health’ need to be reframed and cover a broader set of environmental and social dimensions of sustainability. The focus of the narrative also needs to move from a producer-centric to a ‘whole chain’ perspective that includes greater inclusion of the later stages with a focus on food waste, by-product utilization and consumption. Moreover, seafood should not be treated as a single aggregated item in sustainability assessments. Rather, it should be recognized as a highly diverse set of foods, with variable environmental impacts, edible yield rates and nutritional profiles. Clarifying discussions around seafood will help to deepen the integration of fisheries and aquaculture into the global agenda on sustainable food production, trade and consumption, and assist governments, private sector actors, NGOs and academics alike in identifying where improvements can be made.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Animalia
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-40601 (URN)10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2019.101991 (DOI)2-s2.0-85073999829 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-11-12 Created: 2019-11-12 Last updated: 2019-11-12Bibliographically approved
Borthwick, L., Bergman, K. & Ziegler, F. (2019). Svensk konsumtion av sjömat.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Svensk konsumtion av sjömat
2019 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Den här rapporten visar att det är möjligt att få fram tillförlitlig statistik över svensk sjömatskonsumtion för alla arter utom sill och skarpsill på en detaljgrad som tidigare saknats, trots de dataluckor som finns.Sjömatskonsumtionen i Sverige beräknas ligga på 25 kg per capita hel sjömat, vilket motsvarar 12,5 kg ätlig sjömat eller knappt två portioner i veckan. Vi äter mindre sjömat än för fem år sedan.Upp mot 80 olika sjömatsarter finns på den svenska marknaden, men de tio vanligaste står för 80 procent av konsumtionen. Mest äter svenskar av lax, sill, torsk och räkor.Knappt 30 procent av det som äts kommer från den inhemska produktionen av sjömat från yrkes- och fritidsfiske, samt odling. Den inhemska produktionen kan ses som Sveriges teoretiska självförsörjningsgrad av sjömat. Drygt 70 procent importeras alltså och då främst med Norge, Danmark och Kina som avsändarland. Från den svenska produktionen är det främst sill, skarpsill, regnbåge och den fisk som rapporteras under koden ”Fryst fisk i.a.n.” i tulltaxan, som exporteras. Figuren nedan visar fördelningen mellan import och inhemsk produktion.Siffran på sillkonsumtion är mycket osäker på grund av att den officiella statistiken håller låg kvalitet. Sill är den volymmässigt och ekonomiskt viktigaste arten i svenskt fiske och den är viktig för svensk konsumtion. Det är därmed anmärkningsvärt att data kring fisket och handeln är så bristfällig.Det är genomförbart att ta fram statistiken på årlig basis för att följa trenden för sjömatskonsumtion över tid, både totalt och utvecklingen av enskilda arter. Metoden som utvecklats här förenklar detta avsevärt, men det krävs fortfarande en del manuell justering och bearbetning av befintliga dataset, samt kunskap om branschen.

Publisher
p. 24
Series
RISE Rapport ; 2019:27
National Category
Agricultural Science, Forestry and Fisheries Fish and Aquacultural Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-38332 (URN)978-91-88907-53-0 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Note

Arbetet med att ta fram information om svensk konsumtion av sjömat har gjorts på uppdrag av Landsbygdsnätverkets tematiska grupp för fiske och vattenbruk, i samarbete med Jordbruksverket samt forskningsprojektet SEAWIN som leds av Kungliga Vetenskapsakademien/Stockholm Resilience Center, finansierat av Formas.Även representanter från Havs- och Vattenmyndigheten samt Fiskbranschens Riksförbund har bidragit till arbetet.

Available from: 2019-04-15 Created: 2019-04-15 Last updated: 2019-04-15Bibliographically approved
Ziegler, F., Groen, E. A., Hornborg, S., Bokkers, E. A. M., Karlsen, K. M. & de Boer, I. J. M. (2018). Assessing broad life cycle impacts of daily onboard decision-making, annual strategic planning, and fisheries management in a northeast Atlantic trawl fishery. The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 23(7), 1357-1367
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing broad life cycle impacts of daily onboard decision-making, annual strategic planning, and fisheries management in a northeast Atlantic trawl fishery
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2018 (English)In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, ISSN 0948-3349, E-ISSN 1614-7502, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 1357-1367Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Capture fisheries are the only industrial-scale harvesting of a wild resource for food. Temporal variability in environmental performance of fisheries has only recently begun to be explored, but only between years, not within a year. Our aim was to better understand the causes of temporal variability within and between years and to identify improvement options through management at a company level and in fisheries management. Methods: We analyzed the variability in broad environmental impacts of a demersal freeze trawler targeting cod, haddock, saithe, and shrimp, mainly in the Norwegian Sea and in the Barents Sea. The analysis was based on daily data for fishing activities between 2011 and 2014 and the functional unit was a kilo of landing from one fishing trip. We used biological indicators in a novel hierarchic approach, depending on data availability, to quantify biotic impacts. Landings were categorized as target (having defined target reference points) or bycatch species (classified as threatened or as data-limited). Indicators for target and bycatch impacts were quantified for each fishing trip, as was the seafloor area swept. Results and discussion: No significant difference in fuel use was found between years, but variability was considerable within a year, i.e., between fishing trips. Trips targeting shrimp were more fuel intensive than those targeting fish, due to a lower catch rate. Steaming to and from port was less important for fuel efficiency than steaming between fishing locations. A tradeoff was identified between biotic and abiotic impacts. Landings classified as main target species generally followed the maximum sustainable yield (MSY) framework, and proportions of threatened species were low, while proportions of data-limited bycatch were larger. This improved considerably when reference points were defined for saithe in 2014. Conclusions: The variability between fishing trips shows that there is room for improvement through management. Fuel use per landing was strongly influenced by target species, fishing pattern, and fisheries management. Increased awareness about the importance of onboard decision-making can lead to improved performance. This approach could serve to document performance over time helping fishing companies to better understand the effect of their daily and more long-term decision-making on the environmental performance of their products. Recommendations: Fishing companies should document their resource use and production on a detailed level. Fuel use should be monitored as part of the management system. Managing authorities should ensure that sufficient data is available to evaluate the sustainability of exploitation levels of all harvested species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2018
Keywords
Bycatch, Cod, Fisheries management, Fuel, Haddock, LCA, Shrimp, Trawling
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-34300 (URN)10.1007/s11367-015-0898-3 (DOI)2-s2.0-84930526132 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-30 Created: 2018-07-30 Last updated: 2019-07-02Bibliographically approved
Tlusty, M., Tyedmers, P., Ziegler, F., Jonell, M., Henriksson, P. J. G., Newton, R., . . . Cao, L. (2018). Commentary: Comparing efficiency in aquatic and terrestrial animal production systems. Environmental Research Letters, 13(12), Article ID 128001.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Commentary: Comparing efficiency in aquatic and terrestrial animal production systems
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2018 (English)In: Environmental Research Letters, ISSN 1748-9318, Vol. 13, no 12, article id 128001Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aquaculture is receiving increased attention from a variety of stakeholders. This is largely due to its current role in the global food system of supplying more than half of the seafood consumed, and also because the industry continues to steadily expand (UN Food and Agriculture Organization 2018). A recent article in Environmental Research Letters, 'Feed conversion efficiency in aquaculture: Do we measure it correctly?', by Fry et al (2018a) found that measuring feed conversion efficiency of selected aquatic and terrestrial farmed animals using protein and calorie retention resulted in species comparisons (least to most efficient) and overlap among species dissimilar from comparisons based on widely used weight-based feed conversion ratio (FCR) values. The study prompted spirited discussions among researchers, industry representatives, and others. A group assembled to write a standard rebuttal, but during this process, decided it was best to engage the study's original authors to join the discourse. Through this collaboration, we provide the resultant additional context relevant to the study in order to advance conversations and research on the use of efficiency measures in aquatic and terrestrial animal production systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Physics Publishing, 2018
Keywords
Animals, Aquaculture, Conversion efficiency, Efficiency measure, Environmental researches, Farmed animals, Feed conversion ratios, Food and agriculture organizations, Industry representatives, Species comparisons, Terrestrial animals, Efficiency, Animalia
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-37952 (URN)10.1088/1748-9326/aae945 (DOI)2-s2.0-85060130448 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-23 Created: 2019-04-23 Last updated: 2019-05-03Bibliographically approved
Skontorp Hognes, E., Tyedmers, P., Krewer, C., Scholten, J. & Ziegler, F. (2018). Seafood Life Cycle Inventory database : Methodology and Principles and Data Quality Guidelines.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Seafood Life Cycle Inventory database : Methodology and Principles and Data Quality Guidelines
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2018 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

En växande insikt om betydelsen av livsmedel för global miljöpåverkan, särskilt animaliska livsmedel inklusive sjömat, har lett till ett behov hos producenter såväl som handeln att kommunicera miljöpåverkan av råvaror och produkter genom livsmedelskedjan. Detta visar sig i form av nya krav på att dokumentera produkters miljöavtryck, t ex vid certifiering och i regelverk. EU initiativet inom hållbar utveckling med en "inre marknad för gröna produkter" är ett exempel, med målet att dokumentera miljöavtrycket av produkter på EU marknaden enligt metoden Product Environmental Footprinting (PEF). Målet är att göra det möjligt för konsumenter, handel, producenter och lagstiftare att göra medvetna val och att etablera drivkrafter mot reducerad miljöpåverkan i produkters värdekedja.

För att kunna leva upp till dessa nya krav, krävs tillgång på representativ data av hög kvalitet, något som i stort sett har saknats för sjömatsprodukter. För att göra högkvalitativa, representativa data kring resursåtgång och miljöpåverkan av sjömatsprodukter (inklusive biomassa som direkt eller indirekt används till foder) tillgängliga, initierade den norska sjömatsbranschen ett pilotprojekt. Projektet definierade en rekommenderad metod och struktur för datainsamling och använde denna metod för att samla in tillgängliga data för ett antal pilotfall. Metoden för datainsamling presenteras i detta dokument och kan, tillsammans med pilotdataseten som gjorts tillgängliga i projektet, användas av näringen som grund för en bredare datainsamling för att skapa en utbyggd sjömats-LCI-databas.

Abstract [en]

An increasing awareness about the important role of food, in particular animal-based foods including seafood, for global environmental impacts has led to a need of producers as well as retailers to communicate environmental impacts of raw materials and products through the food chain. This is demonstrated by new requirements to document the environmental footprints of products, e.g. by certification schemes and policies. The EU policy for sustainable development with its "single market for green products" is one example, aiming for documenting the environmental footprint of products on the EU market according to the Product Environmental Footprint (PEF) method. The goal is to enable consumers, retailers, producer, regulators and policy makers to make conscious choices and establish drivers for reducing environmental impacts throughout product supply chains.

To be able to live up to these new requirements, representative data of high quality is needed, something which has largely been missing for seafood products. To make high-quality, representative data on the resource use and environmental impacts caused by seafood products (including biomass used directly or indirectly for feed) available, the Norwegian seafood industry initiated a pilot project. The project defined a recommended method and structure for data collection and used this method to collect available data for a number of pilot cases. The method for data collection is presented in this document and can, together with the pilot data sets made available through the project, be used by the industry as a basis for a broader data collection to create an expanded seafood LCI database.

Publisher
p. 48
Series
RISE Rapport ; 2018:11
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-36333 (URN)978-91-88695-46-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-11-16 Created: 2018-11-16 Last updated: 2019-02-01Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1995-2338

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