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Shahbazi, S., Kurdve, M., Zackrisson, M., Jönsson, C. & Kristinsdortter, A. R. (2019). Comparison of Four Environmental Assessment Tools in Swedish Manufacturing: A Case Study. Sustainability, 11(7), Article ID 2173.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of Four Environmental Assessment Tools in Swedish Manufacturing: A Case Study
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2019 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 2173Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To achieve sustainable development goals, it is essential to include the industrial system. There are sufficient numbers of tools and methods for measuring, assessing and improving the quality, productivity and efficiency of production, but the number of tools and methods for environmental initiatives on the shop floor is rather low. Incorporating environmental considerations into production and performance management systems still generally involves a top-down approach aggregated for an entire manufacturing plant. Green lean studies have been attempting to fill this gap to some extent, but the lack of detailed methodologies and practical tools for environmental manufacturing improvement on the shop floor is still evident. This paper reports on the application of four environmental assessment tools commonly used among Swedish manufacturing companies—Green Performance Map (GPM), Environmental Value Stream Mapping (EVSM), Waste Flow Mapping (WFM), and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)—to help practitioners and scholars to understand the different features of each tool, so in turn the right tool(s) can be selected according to particular questions and the industrial settings. Because there are some overlap and differences between the tools and a given tool may be more appropriate to a situation depending on the question posed, a combination of tools is suggested to embrace different types of data collection and analysis to include different environmental impacts for better prioritization and decision-making.

Keywords
sustainable manufacturing; environmental assessment tool; green lean
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-38810 (URN)10.3390/su11072173 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-05-17 Created: 2019-05-17 Last updated: 2019-06-27
Shahbazi, S., Kurdve, M., Zackrisson, M., Jönsson, C. & Kristinsdottir, A. R. (2019). Comparison of four environmental assessment tools in Swedish manufacturing: A case study. Sustainability, 11(7), Article ID 2173.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of four environmental assessment tools in Swedish manufacturing: A case study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 2173Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To achieve sustainable development goals, it is essential to include the industrial system. There are sufficient numbers of tools and methods for measuring, assessing and improving the quality, productivity and efficiency of production, but the number of tools and methods for environmental initiatives on the shop floor is rather low. Incorporating environmental considerations into production and performance management systems still generally involves a top-down approach aggregated for an entire manufacturing plant. Green lean studies have been attempting to fill this gap to some extent, but the lack of detailed methodologies and practical tools for environmental manufacturing improvement on the shop floor is still evident. This paper reports on the application of four environmental assessment tools commonly used among Swedish manufacturing companies-Green Performance Map (GPM), Environmental Value Stream Mapping (EVSM), Waste Flow Mapping (WFM), and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)-to help practitioners and scholars to understand the different features of each tool, so in turn the right tool(s) can be selected according to particular questions and the industrial settings. Because there are some overlap and differences between the tools and a given tool may be more appropriate to a situation depending on the question posed, a combination of tools is suggested to embrace different types of data collection and analysis to include different environmental impacts for better prioritization and decision-making.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2019
Keywords
Environmental assessment tool, Green lean, Sustainable manufacturing
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-39675 (URN)10.3390/su10022173 (DOI)2-s2.0-85069754919 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-07 Created: 2019-08-07 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
Berg, H. & Zackrisson, M. (2019). Perspectives on environmental and cost assessment of lithium metal negative electrodes in electric vehicle traction batteries. Journal of Power Sources, 415, 83-90
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perspectives on environmental and cost assessment of lithium metal negative electrodes in electric vehicle traction batteries
2019 (English)In: Journal of Power Sources, ISSN 0378-7753, E-ISSN 1873-2755, Vol. 415, p. 83-90Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Using a lithium metal negative electrode may give lithium metal batteries (LMBs), higher specific energy density and an environmentally more benign chemistry than Li-ion batteries (LIBs). This study asses the environmental and cost impacts of in silico designed LMBs compared to existing LIB designs in a vehicle perspective. The life cycle climate and cost impacts of LMBs show a similar pattern: the use phase has more climate and cost impacts than the production phase. As compared to LIBs and with respect to the positive electrode, Lithium Nickel Manganese Cobalt Oxide (NMC) is preferable to Lithium Iron Phosphate (LFP). The cell cost is highly dependent on the cost of lithium metal; a cost reduction of 50% causes a cell cost reduction of 8–22% depending on the choice of positive electrode material and if the cell is optimised for power or energy. For electric vehicle usage, the total cost per km is mainly dependent on the energy consumption per km and the capacity of the positive electrode, representing cost saving potentials of about 10%. These generic results can be used as a base for investigations of other battery technology using lithium metal electrodes.

Keywords
Electric vehicle, Life cycle assessment, Life cycle cost, Lithium metal, Sustainability, Cobalt compounds, Cost reduction, Electric traction, Electric vehicles, Electrodes, Energy utilization, Iron compounds, Lithium compounds, Lithium-ion batteries, Metals, Nickel oxide, Sustainable development, Electric vehicle usages, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Lifecycle costs, Lithium iron phosphates, Lithium metals, Manganese-cobalt oxides, Positive electrode materials, Specific energy density, Life cycle
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-38195 (URN)10.1016/j.jpowsour.2019.01.047 (DOI)2-s2.0-85060453258 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Energimyndigheten; Funding details: Chalmers Tekniska Högskola; Funding text 1: Financial support has been received from the Swedish Energy Agency (”Batterifondens” research program: TriLi project) and from the XPRES, excellence in production research initiative.

Available from: 2019-03-22 Created: 2019-03-22 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Landström, A., Almström, P., Winroth, M., Andersson, C., Ericson Öberg, A., Kurdve, M., . . . Zackrisson, M. (2018). A life cycle approach to business performance measurement systems. Procedia Manufacturing, 25, 126-133
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A life cycle approach to business performance measurement systems
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2018 (English)In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 25, p. 126-133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Virtually every company has implemented a Business Performance Measurement System (BPMS) with the purpose of monitoring production and business performance and to execute the corporate strategy at all levels in a company. The purpose of this article is to shed light on common pitfalls related to the practical use of BPMS and further to present a life cycle model with the purpose of introducing structured approach to avoiding the pitfalls. The article contributes to further development of the BPMS life cycle concept and practical examples of how it can be used.

Keywords
Business performance measurement systems, Performance indicators, KPI-life cycle
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-35397 (URN)10.1016/j.promfg.2018.06.066 (DOI)
Note

Proceedings of the 8th Swedish Production Symposium (SPS 2018)

Available from: 2018-10-16 Created: 2018-10-16 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Zackrisson, M. & Hildenbrand, J. (2018). Including grid storage to increase the use of renewables case of an island in the North sea. In: Going Green CARE INNOVATION 2018. Conference Program &Abstract Book: . Paper presented at 7th International Symposium and Environmental Exhibition. November 26 - 29, 2018. Vienna, Austria.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Including grid storage to increase the use of renewables case of an island in the North sea
2018 (English)In: Going Green CARE INNOVATION 2018. Conference Program &Abstract Book, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Utilization of renewable energy supply is limited by fluctuations and lack of alignment with demand. Including storage technology in the grid can increase self-consumption of renewable energy in local applications as well as reduce peaks in supply and demand for local low voltage grids with a high share of renewable energy input. The project NETfficient, funded by the European Union under the Grant Agreement 646463, explores requirements and effects of storage solutions in a grid on different levels. On the island of Borkum in the North Sea, a variety of grid-connected use cases is installed and tested in pilot studies. This paper focusses on homes equipped with photovoltaic panels for harvesting energy and two different storage solutions. The research addresses the resource demand and emissions due to novel components and the potential to decrease resource demand during the use phase, applying a life cycle perspective for components and systems. Data from the project as well as from LCA databases are collected and used to calculate environmental impacts for three different systems or applications: Stand alone photovoltaic (PV) panels, PV panels and customized Li- Ion-batteries and PV panels with a disused Li-Ion battery from an electric vehicle. The results indicate that the customized or dedicated Li-Ion battery in combination with PV panels have a larger climate impact avoidance than the other systems.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-37534 (URN)
Conference
7th International Symposium and Environmental Exhibition. November 26 - 29, 2018. Vienna, Austria
Available from: 2019-01-22 Created: 2019-01-22 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Zackrisson, M. (2017). Life cycle assessment of high temperature batteries: 5Ah cell. Swerea IVF AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Life cycle assessment of high temperature batteries: 5Ah cell
2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This report contains a life cycle assessment of a 5Ah LiFeSO4F high-temperature battery cell weighing 110 grams. It was performed in the context of the Swedish From road to load project. The 5 Ah cell has been analyzed from cradle to grave, i.e., from raw material production over own manufacturing, use in a typical application and end-of-life. It has also been compared to other lithium battery cells. The results indicate that:

 Production in Sweden is favourable due to that electricity is a main driver of climate impact and toxicity in the production phase.

 Electricity is a main driver of climate impact and toxicity also in the use phase which emphasizes the need to keep the charge/discharge efficiency high.

 Indium tin oxide in the anode dominates abiotic depletion.

 Comparison with lithium-air cells reflects that the lithium air technology is still very far from commercial reality, while indicating that it is an interesting technology for the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Swerea IVF AB, 2017. p. 57
Series
Swerea IVF Uppdragsrapporter ; 25967
Keywords
Life cycle assessment, high temperature batteries, 5Ah cell, LCA, lithium batteries
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-30146 (URN)
Projects
From road to load project
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research
Available from: 2017-08-15 Created: 2017-08-15 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Zackrisson, M. (2017). Life cycle assessment of long life lithium electrode for electric vehicle batteries: cells for Leaf, Tesla and Volvo bus. Swerea IVF AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Life cycle assessment of long life lithium electrode for electric vehicle batteries: cells for Leaf, Tesla and Volvo bus
2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This report contains a life cycle assessment of 10Ah lithium battery cells with metallic lithium in the anode. It was performed in the context of the Swedish TriLi - Longlife lithium electrodes for EV and HEV batteries - project. The cells have been analyzed from cradle to grave, i.e., from raw material production over own manufacturing, use in three different vehicles: Nissan Leaf, Tesla model S and a Volvo bus; and end-of-life. The study aims to highlight environmental hotspots with lithium batteries with metallic lithium in the anode in order to improve them as well as to investigate environmental benefits with such lithium batteries in different vehicles. Battery cells with metallic lithium in the anode and LFP and NMC chemistry were compared to the original vehicle batteries. In short, the study points towards the following conclusions:

 Both the LFP and NMC lithium metal anode battery cells shows lower climate impact potential, lower abiotic depletion potential and lower toxicity potential than the original NMC and NCA cells with copper anodes. The main reason for the difference is higher energy density which gives lower weight and thus lower electricity consumption. However, the lower carbon footprint of the metal anode cells rests on the assumption that they last as many cycles as the original NMC and NCA, something which has not yet been proven.

 For the same reason (higher energy density) the NMC chemistry shows lower environmental impacts per vehicle kilometre than the LFP chemistry for the metal anode battery cells, but here the difference is much smaller and probably within error margins.

 Assembly energy is a main driver for climate impact. Sensitivity calculations with Swedish average electricity mix for production of the cells show that production impacts can be reduced by 25% by producing in Sweden, compared to global average production.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Swerea IVF AB, 2017. p. 56
Series
Swerea IVF Uppdragsrapporter ; 24603/2
Keywords
Life cycle assessment, lithium batteries, electric vehicle batteries
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-30145 (URN)
Projects
the Swedish TriLi - Longlife lithium electrodes for EV and HEV batteries - project.
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency
Available from: 2017-08-15 Created: 2017-08-15 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Kurdve, M., Henriksson, F., Wiktorsson, M., Denzler, P., Zackrisson, M. & Bjelkemyr, M. (2017). Production System And Material Efficiency Challenges For Large Scale Introduction Of Complex Materials. In: Advanced Materials Proceedings: . Paper presented at Advanced Materials Proceedings (pp. 492-499). , 2(8)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Production System And Material Efficiency Challenges For Large Scale Introduction Of Complex Materials
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2017 (English)In: Advanced Materials Proceedings, 2017, Vol. 2, no 8, p. 492-499Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper links production system research to advanced material research for the vehicle industry. Facilitated by need for reduction of fuel use, the automotive industry is pushing a radical change from using steel structures to new mixed materials structures. In production systems optimised for steel, the changes will affect productivity and material efficiency. Four industrial case studies focusing on production economy and productivity give implications of production technology demands on the material selection regarding new joining techniques and additive or forming methods which has to be investigated when considering new materials. Material efficiency analysis shows that minimising spill in production operations and regulatory demand of recycling need to be considered in material development, which implies both design for disassembly, advanced separation processes and use of recycled raw materials. To be successful in new material introduction, new information flows and knowledge sharing moving from operations and manufacturing development to materials development and design are needed. The material developers could use axiomatic design strategies to structure the production system demands on the materials. State of the art lightweight producers in vehicle and automotive industry are likely early adopters to advanced lightweight structures with need of information flows between material development and operations.

Keywords
Mixed materials, material efficiency, light weight products, materials development, production system.
National Category
Other Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-32892 (URN)10.5185/amp.2017/805 (DOI)
Conference
Advanced Materials Proceedings
Available from: 2017-12-20 Created: 2017-12-20 Last updated: 2019-06-27
Zackrisson, M., Kurdve, M., Shahbazi, S., Wiktorsson, M., Winroth, M., Landström, A., . . . Myrelid, A. (2017). Sustainability Performance Indicators at Shop Floor Level in Large Manufacturing Companies. Procedia CIRP, 61, 457-462
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainability Performance Indicators at Shop Floor Level in Large Manufacturing Companies
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2017 (English)In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 61, p. 457-462Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article investigates sustainability in the performance measurement systems of Swedish manufacturing companies. It builds on a previous study that documents relatively few direct environmental indicators at shop floor level, which raises questions about possible indirect links between existing indicators and the environment that could be used to improve the environmental aspect of company’s sustainability ambitions. A method for identifying and categorizing indirect links to sustainability issues was defined and used. The results suggest that at shop floor level 90% of the indicators have at least an indirect relation to one or more of the sustainability dimensions economy, environment and social, of which 26% are at least indirectly related to the environmental dimension. Despite the many indirect connections, participating companies perceive a need to improve sustainability indicators and some ideas are suggested.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2017
Keywords
Benchmarking, Environmental management, Floors, Life cycle, Manufacture, Supply chain management, Waste disposal, Environmental aspects, Environmental indicators, Manufacturing companies, Performance measurement system, Sustainability dimensions, Sustainability indicators, Sustainability issues, Sustainability performance, Sustainable development
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-30156 (URN)10.1016/j.procir.2016.11.199 (DOI)2-s2.0-85020043898 (Scopus ID)
Note

Conference of 24th CIRP Conference on Life Cycle Engineering, CIRP LCE 2017 ; Conference Date: 8 March 2017 Through 10 March 2017; Conference Code:127797

Available from: 2017-08-01 Created: 2017-08-01 Last updated: 2019-07-01Bibliographically approved
Almström, P., Andersson, C., Ericsson Öberg, A., Hammersberg, P., Kurdve, M., Landström, A., . . . Zackrisson, M. (2017). Sustainable and Resource Efficient Business Performance Measurement Systems: - The Handbook.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable and Resource Efficient Business Performance Measurement Systems: - The Handbook
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2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-34201 (URN)
Projects
XPRES - Excellence in Production ResearchSuRe BPMS - Sustainable and Resource Efficient Business Performance Measurement Systems
Funder
XPRES - Initiative for excellence in production research
Available from: 2018-07-16 Created: 2018-07-16 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1826-8665

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