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Publications (10 of 43) Show all publications
Koppolu, R., Abitbol, T., Kumar, V., Jaiswal, A. K., Swerin, A. & Toivakka, M. (2018). Continuous roll-to-roll coating of cellulose nanocrystals onto paperboard. Cellulose (London), 25(10), 6055-6069
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Continuous roll-to-roll coating of cellulose nanocrystals onto paperboard
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2018 (English)In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 25, no 10, p. 6055-6069Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is an increased interest in the use of cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) films and coatings for a range of functional applications in the fields of material science, biomedical engineering, and pharmaceutical sciences. Most of these applications have been demonstrated on films and coatings produced using laboratory-scale batch processes, such as solvent casting, dip coating, or spin coating. For successful coating application of CNC suspensions using a high throughput process, several challenges need to be addressed: relatively high viscosity at low solids content, coating brittleness, and potentially poor adhesion to the substrate. This work aims to address these problems. The impact of plasticizer on suspension rheology, coating adhesion, and barrier properties was quantified, and the effect of different pre-coatings on the wettability and adhesion of CNC coatings to paperboard substrates was explored. CNC suspensions were coated onto pre-coated paperboard in a roll-to-roll process using a custom-built slot die. The addition of sorbitol reduced the brittleness of the CNC coatings, and a thin cationic starch pre-coating improved their adhesion to the paperboard. The final coat weight, dry coating thickness, and coating line speed were varied between 1–11 g/m2, 900 nm–7 µm, and 2.5–10 m/min, respectively. The barrier properties, adhesive strength, coating coverage, and smoothness of the CNC coatings were characterized. SEM images show full coating coverage at coat weights as low as 1.5 g/m2. With sorbitol as plasticizer and at coat weights above 3.5 g/m2, heptane vapor and water vapor transmission rates were reduced by as much as 99% and 75% respectively. Compared to other film casting techniques, the process employed in this work deposits a relatively thick coating in significantly less time, and may therefore pave the way toward various functional applications based on CNCs.

Keywords
Barrier films, Barrier properties, Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), Roll-to-roll coating, Slot coating, Sorbitol plasticizer, Adhesion, Alcohols, Batch data processing, Biomedical engineering, Brittleness, Cellulose, Cellulose derivatives, Cellulose films, Fracture mechanics, Nanocrystals, Paperboards, Plasticity, Plasticizers, Reinforced plastics, Rolls (machine components), Substrates, Suspensions (fluids), Thickness measurement, Cellulose nano-crystals, Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC), Cellulose nanocrystal (CNCs), Functional applications, Roll to Roll, Water vapor transmission rate, Coatings
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-34488 (URN)10.1007/s10570-018-1958-1 (DOI)2-s2.0-85050341471 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-08 Created: 2018-08-08 Last updated: 2018-12-12Bibliographically approved
Swerin, A. (2018). Dimensional Scaling of Aqueous Ink Imbibition and Inkjet Printability on Porous Pigment Coated Paper-A Revisit. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dimensional Scaling of Aqueous Ink Imbibition and Inkjet Printability on Porous Pigment Coated Paper-A Revisit
2018 (English)In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, ISSN 0888-5885, E-ISSN 1520-5045Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

A recently published dimensional scaling of infiltration of water-based inkjet fluids was used to revisit published inkjet printability data on mineral-pigment-based, inkjet-receptive coated papers. The dimensional scaling was developed using simple fluids on homogeneous isotropic media and applied on uncoated papers using complex inkjet fluids but so far has not been related to printability. It is shown that the scaling can also work for coated papers using commercial dye- and pigment-based inks with a suggested relation to printability as given by the color gamut area, in which the primary factor is the product of permeability and capillary pressure. A successful scaling suggests that inkjet printability can be predicted from flow and materials parameters, namely, porosity, viscosity, imbibed volume, permeability, and capillary pressure, and would be of general applicability in other areas of inkjet printing. The results further imply the usefulness of the approach in other functional surface modification using waterborne procedures on hard or soft porous materials.

Keywords
Capillarity, Capillary tubes, Paper, Pigments, Porous materials, Surface treatment, Coated paper, Functional surfaces, Isotropic media, Materials parameters, Mineral pigments, Primary factors, Simple fluids, Uncoated paper, Ink
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-36678 (URN)10.1021/acs.iecr.8b03868 (DOI)2-s2.0-85058090641 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2018-12-21Bibliographically approved
Niga, P., Hansson-Mille, P. M., Swerin, A., Claesson, P. M., Schoelkopf, J., Gane, P. A., . . . Johnson, C. M. (2018). Interactions between model cell membranes and the neuroactive drug propofol.. Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 526, 230-243
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interactions between model cell membranes and the neuroactive drug propofol.
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 526, p. 230-243Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

phospholipid, NR data reveal that propofol is located exclusively in the head group region, which is rationalized in the context of previous studies. The results imply a non-homogeneous distribution of propofol in the plane of real cell membranes, which is an inference that requires urgent testing and may help to explain why such low concentration of the drug are required to induce general anaesthesia.

Keywords
Langmuir trough, Model membrane, Neutron reflectometry, Phospholipid monolayers, Propofol, Small amphiphilic drug, Surface pressure isotherm, Vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-33920 (URN)10.1016/j.jcis.2018.03.052 (DOI)29734090 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046641029 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-07 Created: 2018-06-07 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Reverdy, C., Belgacem, N., Moghaddam, M. S., Sundin, M., Swerin, A. & Bras, J. (2018). One-step superhydrophobic coating using hydrophobized cellulose nanofibrils. Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, 544, 152-158
Open this publication in new window or tab >>One-step superhydrophobic coating using hydrophobized cellulose nanofibrils
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2018 (English)In: Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, ISSN 0927-7757, E-ISSN 1873-4359, Vol. 544, p. 152-158Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Superhydrophobic surfaces have high potential in self-cleaning and anti-fouling applications. We developed a one-step superhydrophobic coating formulation containing sodium oleate (NaOl), hydrophobized precipitated calcium carbonate and biobased cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) hydrophobized with either alkyl ketene dimer (AKD) or amino propyl trimethoxy silane (APMS) as a binder to fix and distribute the particles. Coatings were made on paperboard and the wetting behavior of the surface was assessed. Static, advancing and receding contact angles with water as well as roll-off and water shedding angle were compared to coatings made with styrene butadiene latex as binder instead of CNFs. Modifications with alkyl ketene dimer showed most promising results for a viable process in achieving superhydrophobic paperboard but required reformulation of the coating with optimized and reduced amount of NaOl to avoid surfactant-induced wetting via excess NaOl. A static water contact angle of 150° was reached for the CNF-AKD. The use of CNFs enables the improvement of coating quality avoiding cracking with the use of nanocellulose as a renewable binder.

Keywords
Cellulose nanofibrils, Paperboard, Superhydrophobicity, Binders, Bins, Calcium carbonate, Cellulose, Coatings, Contact angle, Nanofibers, Paperboards, Sodium Carbonate, Styrene, Wetting, Advancing and receding contact angles, Cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs), Precipitated calcium carbonate, Styrene butadiene latices, Super-hydrophobic surfaces, Superhydrophobic coatings, Hydrophobicity, 1, 3 butadiene, dimer, ketene derivative, latex, nanofiber, oleate sodium, silane derivative, surfactant, water, Article, chemical modification, material coating, priority journal, scanning electron microscopy, water absorption, Cellulose Fibers, Coating, Crazing, Dimers, Sodium Compounds
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-33423 (URN)10.1016/j.colsurfa.2017.12.059 (DOI)2-s2.0-85042307822 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: ANR-16-CARN-0025-01, Association Instituts Carnot; Funding details: ANR-11-LABX-0030, Labex; Funding details: COST, European Cooperation in Science and Technology; Funding details: AIR, American Institutes for Research; Funding details: Stiftelsen Nils och Dorthi Troëdssons Forskningsfond;

Available from: 2018-03-09 Created: 2018-03-09 Last updated: 2019-01-02Bibliographically approved
MacKenzie, J., Söderberg, D., Swerin, A. & Lundell, F. (2018). Turbulent stress measurements of fibre suspensions in a straight pipe. Physics of fluids, 30(2), Article ID 025104.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Turbulent stress measurements of fibre suspensions in a straight pipe
2018 (English)In: Physics of fluids, ISSN 1070-6631, E-ISSN 1089-7666, Vol. 30, no 2, article id 025104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The focus of the present work is an experimental study of the behaviour of semi-dilute, opaque fibre suspensions in fully developed cylindrical pipe flows. Measurements of the normal and turbulent shear stress components and the mean flow were acquired using phase-contrast magnetic resonance velocimetry. Two fibre types, namely, pulp fibre and nylon fibre, were considered in this work and are known to differ in elastic modulus. In total, three different mass concentrations and seven Reynolds numbers were tested to investigate the effects of fibre interactions during the transition from the plug flow to fully turbulent flow. It was found that in fully turbulent flows of nylon fibres, the normal, uzuz+, and shear, uzur+ (note that · is the temporal average, u is the fluctuating velocity, z is the axial or streamwise component, and r is the radial direction), turbulent stresses increased with Reynolds number regardless of the crowding number (a concentration measure). For pulp fibre, the turbulent stresses increased with Reynolds number when a fibre plug was present in the flow and were spatially similar in magnitude when no fibre plug was present. Pressure spectra revealed that the stiff, nylon fibre reduced the energy in the inertial-subrange with an increasing Reynolds and crowding number, whereas the less stiff pulp fibre effectively cuts the energy cascade prematurely when the network was fully dispersed.

Keywords
Magnetic resonance, Pipe flow, Polyamides, Rayon, Reynolds number, Shear flow, Shear stress, Turbulent flow, Concentration measures, Cylindrical pipes, Fibre interactions, Fluctuating velocities, Inertial subrange, Phase-contrast magnetic resonances, Pressure spectrum, Turbulent shear stress, Fibers
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-33444 (URN)10.1063/1.5008395 (DOI)2-s2.0-85042207370 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-09 Created: 2018-03-09 Last updated: 2018-08-14Bibliographically approved
Moghaddam, M. S., Van den Bulcke, J., Wålinder, M. E. P., Claesson, P. M., Van Acker, J. & Swerin, A. (2017). Microstructure of chemically modified wood using X-ray computed tomography in relation to wetting properties. Holzforschung, 71(2), 119-128
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microstructure of chemically modified wood using X-ray computed tomography in relation to wetting properties
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2017 (English)In: Holzforschung, ISSN 0018-3830, E-ISSN 1437-434X, Vol. 71, no 2, p. 119-128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

X-ray computed tomography (XCT) was utilized to visualize and quantify the 2D and 3D microstructure of acetylated southern yellow pine (pine) and maple, as well as furfurylated pine samples. The total porosity and the porosity of different cell types, as well as cell wall thickness and maximum opening of tracheid lumens were evaluated. The wetting properties (swelling and capillary uptake) were related to these microstructural characteristics. The data show significant changes in the wood structure for furfurylated pine sapwood samples, including a change in tracheid shape and filling of tracheids by furan polymer. In contrast, no such changes were noted for the acetylated pine samples at the high resolution of 0.8

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Walter de Gruyter, 2017
Keywords
acetylation, cell wall thickness, furfurylation, hardwood, microstructure, porosity, softwood, sub-micron X-ray computed tomography, tracheid, wettability
National Category
Wood Science Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-27771 (URN)10.1515/hf-2015-0227 (DOI)2-s2.0-85011867252 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-01-07 Created: 2017-01-07 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
MacKenzie, J., Söderberg, D., Swerin, A. & Lundell, F. (2017). Turbulent stress measurements with phase-contrast magnetic resonance through tilted slices. Experiments in Fluids, 58, Article ID 51.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Turbulent stress measurements with phase-contrast magnetic resonance through tilted slices
2017 (English)In: Experiments in Fluids, ISSN 0723-4864, E-ISSN 1432-1114, Vol. 58, article id 51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aiming at turbulent measurements in opaque suspensions, a simplistic methodology for measuring the turbulent stresses with phase-contrast magnetic resonance velocimetry is described. The method relies on flow-compensated and flow-encoding protocols with the flow encoding gradient normal to the slice. The experimental data is compared with direct numerical simulations (DNS), both directly but also, more importantly, after spatial averaging of the DNS data that resembles the measurement and data treatment of the experimental data. The results show that the most important MRI data (streamwise velocity, streamwise variance and Reynolds shear stress) is reliable up to at least r¯=0.75'>r¯=0.75r¯=0.75 without any correction, paving the way for dearly needed turbulence and stress measurements in opaque suspensions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Verlag, 2017
Keywords
Encoding (symbols), Internet protocols, Magnetic resonance, Shear flow, Shear stress, Data treatment, On flow, Phase-contrast magnetic resonances, Reynolds shear stress, Spatial averaging, Stream-wise velocities, Turbulent measurements, Turbulent stress, Stress measurement
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-29781 (URN)10.1007/s00348-017-2328-8 (DOI)2-s2.0-85017422727 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Bo Rydins Stiftelse för Vetenskaplig Forskning

Available from: 2017-06-12 Created: 2017-06-12 Last updated: 2018-08-14Bibliographically approved
Alriksson, B., Eskilsson, M., Johansson, E., Lapidot, S., Norström, M., Schultz-Eklund, O., . . . Swerin, A. (2016). Europe’s first pilot facility for cellulose nanocrystals (CNC). In: Annual Surface and Materials Chemistry Symposium and Materials for tomorrow, ASMCS 2016, November 8-10, 2016, Gothenburg, Sweden: . Paper presented at Annual Surface and Materials Chemistry Symposium and Materials for tomorrow, ASMCS 2016, November 8-10, 2016, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Europe’s first pilot facility for cellulose nanocrystals (CNC)
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2016 (English)In: Annual Surface and Materials Chemistry Symposium and Materials for tomorrow, ASMCS 2016, November 8-10, 2016, Gothenburg, Sweden, 2016Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Other Chemistry Topics Wood Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-26188 (URN)
Conference
Annual Surface and Materials Chemistry Symposium and Materials for tomorrow, ASMCS 2016, November 8-10, 2016, Gothenburg, Sweden
Available from: 2016-11-18 Created: 2016-11-18 Last updated: 2018-08-14Bibliographically approved
Moghaddam, M. S., Heydari, G., Tuominen, M., Fielden, M., Haapanen, J., Mäkelä, J. M., . . . Swerin, A. (2016). Hydrophobisation of wood surfaces by combining liquid flame spray (LFS) and plasma treatment: Dynamic wetting properties. Holzforschung, 70(6), 527-537
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hydrophobisation of wood surfaces by combining liquid flame spray (LFS) and plasma treatment: Dynamic wetting properties
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2016 (English)In: Holzforschung, ISSN 0018-3830, E-ISSN 1437-434X, Vol. 70, no 6, p. 527-537Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The hydrophilic nature of wood surfaces is a major cause for water uptake and subsequent biological degradation and dimensional changes. In the present paper, a thin transparent superhydrophobic layer on pine veneer surfaces has been created for controlling surface wettability and water repellency. This effect was achieved by means of the liquid flame spray (LFS) technique, in the course of which the nanoparticulate titanium dioxide (TiO2) was brought to the surface, followed by plasma polymerisation. Plasma polymerised perfluorohexane (PFH) or hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) were then deposited onto the LFS-treated wood surfaces. The same treatment systems were applied to silicon wafers so as to have well-defined reference surfaces. The dynamic wettability was studied by the multicycle Wilhelmy plate (mWP) method, resulting in advancing and receding contact angles as well as sorption behavior of the samples during repeated wetting cycles in water. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were employed to characterise the topography and surface chemical compositions and to elucidate the question how the morphology of the nanoparticles and plasma affect the wetting behavior. A multi-scale roughness (micro-nano roughness) was found and this enhanced the forced wetting durability via a superhydrophobic effect on the surface, which was stable even after repeated wetting cycles. The hydrophobic effect of this approach was higher compared to that of plasma modified surfaces with their micro-scale modification.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Walter de Gruyter, 2016
Keywords
cold plasma, contact angle (CA), dynamic wetting, hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO), hydrophobisation, liquid flame spray (LFS), multi-scale roughness, nano-sized metal oxide (TiO2), perfluorohexane (PFH), plasma polymerisation, superhydrophobicity, Wilhelmy plate method, wood
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology Materials Chemistry Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-898 (URN)10.1515/hf-2015-0148 (DOI)2-s2.0-84973442118 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-08-31 Created: 2016-08-31 Last updated: 2019-01-04Bibliographically approved
Oko, A. & Swerin, A. (2016). Infiltration and dimensional scaling of picoliter inkjet drops on nano- and microporous materials – isotropic porous glass and anisotropic paper. In: Annual Surface and Materials Chemistry Symposium and Materials for tomorrow, ASMCS 2016, November 8-10, 2016, Gothenburg, Sweden: . Paper presented at Annual Surface and Materials Chemistry Symposium and Materials for tomorrow, ASMCS 2016, November 8-10, 2016, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Infiltration and dimensional scaling of picoliter inkjet drops on nano- and microporous materials – isotropic porous glass and anisotropic paper
2016 (English)In: Annual Surface and Materials Chemistry Symposium and Materials for tomorrow, ASMCS 2016, November 8-10, 2016, Gothenburg, Sweden, 2016Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology Other Chemistry Topics Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-26186 (URN)
Conference
Annual Surface and Materials Chemistry Symposium and Materials for tomorrow, ASMCS 2016, November 8-10, 2016, Gothenburg, Sweden
Available from: 2016-11-18 Created: 2016-11-18 Last updated: 2018-08-14Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6394-6990

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