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Sanches, P., Höök, K., Sas, C. & Ståhl, A. (2019). Ambiguity as a resource to inform proto-practices: The case of skin conductance. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 26(4), Article ID 21.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ambiguity as a resource to inform proto-practices: The case of skin conductance
2019 (English)In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, Vol. 26, no 4, article id 21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Skin conductance is an interesting measure of arousal level, largely unfamiliar to most end-users. We designed a mobile application mirroring end-users’ skin conductance in evocative visualizations, purposefully made ambiguous to invite rich interpretations. Twenty-three participants used the system for a month. Through the lens of a practice-based analysis of weekly interviews and the logged data, several quite different—sometimes even mutually exclusive—interpretations or proto-practices arose: as stress management; sports performance; emotion tracking; general life logging; personality representation; or behavior change practices. This suggests the value of a purposefully open initial design to allow for the emergence of broader proto-practices to be followed by a second step of tailored design for each identified goal to facilitate the transition from proto-practice to practice. We contribute to the HCI discourse on ambiguity in design, arguing for balancing openness and ambiguity with scaffolding to better support the emergence of practices around biodata.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery, 2019
Keywords
Ambiguity, Biofeedback, Data, Emotion, Open-ended design, Practice theory, Proto-practices, Skin conductance, Sports, Stress, Wearables, Scaffolds, Stresses, Open-ended designs, Practice theories
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-39653 (URN)10.1145/3318143 (DOI)2-s2.0-85069516500 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Lancaster University; Funding details: 722022; Funding details: Stiftelsen för Strategisk Forskning, SSF, RIT15-0046; Funding details: Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan, KTH; Funding text 1: This work has been supported by AffecTech: Personal Technologies for Affective Health, Innovative Training Network funded by the H2020 People Programme under Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement No 722022 and the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research project RIT15-0046. Authors’ addresses: P. Sanches and K. Höök, Media Technology and Interaction Design, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm, Sweden; C. Sas, School of Computing and Communications and Institute for Social Futures, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK; email: c.sas@lancaster.ac.uk; A. Ståhl, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden AB, ICT SICS, Box 1263, SE-164 29 Kista, Sweden. Permission to make digital or hard copies of all or part of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full citation on the first page. Copyrights for components of this work owned by others than ACM must be honored. Abstracting with credit is permitted. To copy otherwise, or republish, to post on servers or to redistribute to lists, requires prior specific permission and/or a fee. Request permissions from permissions@acm.org. © 2019 Association for Computing Machinery. 1073-0516/2019/07-ART21 $15.00 https://doi.org/10.1145/3318143

Available from: 2019-08-07 Created: 2019-08-07 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
Faerneus, Y., Höök, K. & Ståhl, A. (2018). Designing for Joyful Movement. In: Mark Blythe and Andrew Monk (Ed.), Funology 2: From Usability to Enjoyment (pp. 193-207). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing for Joyful Movement
2018 (English)In: Funology 2: From Usability to Enjoyment / [ed] Mark Blythe and Andrew Monk, Springer, 2018, p. 193-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Interaction design research has broadened its focus from settings in which people would sit more or less still in front of static computers doing their work tasks, to instead thriving off new interactive materials, mobile use, and ubiquitously available data of all sorts, creating interactions everywhere. These changes have put into question such as play versus learning, work versus leisure, or casual versus serious technology use. As both hardware and software have become mobile—both literally and in terms of transgressing cultural categories—the different social spheres and the rules that they are associated with are changing

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-34950 (URN)978-3-319-68213-6 (ISBN)
Note

Part of the Human–Computer Interaction Series book series (HCIS)

Available from: 2018-08-24 Created: 2018-08-24 Last updated: 2018-08-27Bibliographically approved
Höök, K., Caramiaux, B., Erkut, C., Forlizzi, J., Hajinejad, N., Haller, M., . . . Tobiasson, H. (2018). Embracing First-Person Perspectives in Soma-Based Design. Informatics, 5(1), Article ID 8.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Embracing First-Person Perspectives in Soma-Based Design
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2018 (English)In: Informatics, ISSN 2227-9709, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A set of prominent designers embarked on a research journey to explore aesthetics in movement-based design. Here we unpack one of the design sensitivities unique to our practice: a strong first person perspective-where the movements, somatics and aesthetic sensibilities of the designer, design researcher and user are at the forefront. We present an annotated portfolio of design exemplars and a brief introduction to some of the design methods and theory we use, together substantiating and explaining the first-person perspective. At the same time, we show how this felt dimension, despite its subjective nature, is what provides rigor and structure to our design research. Our aim is to assist researchers in soma-based design and designers wanting to consider the multiple facets when designing for the aesthetics of movement. The applications span a large field of designs, including slow introspective, contemplative interactions, arts, dance, health applications, games, work applications and many others.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
movement-based interaction, somaesthetic design, aesthetics, somatics, first-person perspective
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-34922 (URN)10.3390/informatics5010008 (DOI)2-s2.0-85054173892 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-24 Created: 2018-08-24 Last updated: 2019-03-21Bibliographically approved
Jung, H. & Ståhl, A. (2018). Soma-Wearable Design: Integrating Somaesthetic Practice and Fashion Design for Somatic Wellbeing. In: Proceedings of DRS 2018: . Paper presented at DRS2018Design Research Society. Limerick, Ireland. 25-28 June, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Soma-Wearable Design: Integrating Somaesthetic Practice and Fashion Design for Somatic Wellbeing
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of DRS 2018, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

With advanced technologies and raised expectations for the quality of life, research and design attempts are increasing to promote wellbeing. While data-based reflective practice and behaviour change have been a main strategy in supporting technology-mediated wellbeing, we bring the perspectives of somaesthetic practice and fashion design to complement this research scene. Assuming that body consciousness could positively influence self-perception, presentation and performance through clothing, we propose soma-wearable design as an alternative approach to explore qualities that elaborate and promote somatic wellbeing. First, we conceptualize constructive links between design for reflection, somaesthetic practice, and style-fashion-dress; and re-interpret the core qualities of somaesthetic appreciation (Höök et al., 2016) for soma-wearable design: 1) transient space for reflection with the body, 2) sensory prompt synched to context, 3) body modification for subject formation, and 4) learning through bodily experience. We articulate these qualities based on the survey of selected fashion objects; apply the soma-wearable design approach to a workshop with fashion design students; and discuss implications about forms, materials and experiential qualities of soma-wearables. 

Keywords
Soma-wearable design; somaesthetic practice; somatic wellbeing; style-fashion-dress
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-34949 (URN)10.21606/drs.2018.646 (DOI)
Conference
DRS2018Design Research Society. Limerick, Ireland. 25-28 June, 2018
Available from: 2018-08-24 Created: 2018-08-24 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved
Ståhl, A., Tholander, J., Laaksolahti, J. & Kosmack Vaara, E. (2017). Being, bringing and bridging - Three aspects of sketching with nature. In: DIS 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: . Paper presented at 12th ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, DIS 2017, 10 June 2017 through 14 June 2017 (pp. 1309-1320).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being, bringing and bridging - Three aspects of sketching with nature
2017 (English)In: DIS 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, 2017, p. 1309-1320Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We articulate and reflect on the use of nature as a physical sketching material. We have closely documented explorations of various organic and non-organic materials found during excursions in a local forest and how we used them as resources in sketching. This serves as an exemplar case of how sketching in interaction design can be grounded in empirical explorations of nature. We discuss three examples of sketching based on explorations and experiences with elements and objects from a forest. Processes and characteristics of phenomena in nature such falling leaves, melting and freezing of snow, and perennial growth allowed us to expand our design repertoire and sketching skills, especially as new forms of representations and interactions. Based on this we outline three aspects of how nature can be included in sketching processes: being in nature, bringing nature to the lab, and bridging nature and interaction design.

Keywords
Design exemplar, Design grounding, Interaction design, Nature, Physical sketching, Research through design, New forms, Organic materials, Forestry
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-30878 (URN)10.1145/3064663.3064764 (DOI)2-s2.0-85023161717 (Scopus ID)9781450349222 (ISBN)
Conference
12th ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, DIS 2017, 10 June 2017 through 14 June 2017
Available from: 2017-09-07 Created: 2017-09-07 Last updated: 2019-01-29Bibliographically approved
Höök, K., Hummels, C., Isbister, K., Marti, P., Segura, E. M., Jonsson, M., . . . Lim, Y.-K. (2017). Soma-based design theory. In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings: . Paper presented at 2017 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2017, 6 May 2017 through 11 May 2017, Denver, Colorado, USA (pp. 550-557).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Soma-based design theory
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2017 (English)In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, 2017, p. 550-557Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Movement-based interaction design is increasingly popular, with application domains ranging from dance, sport, gaming to physical rehabilitation. In a workshop at CHI 2016, a set of prominent artists, game design-ers, and interaction designers embarked on a research journey to explore what we came to refer to as "aesthetics in soma-based design". In this follow-up work-shop, we would like to take the next step, shifting from discussing the philosophical underpinnings we draw upon to explain and substantiate our practice, to form our own interaction design theory and conceptualisations. We propose that soma-based design theory needs practical, pragmatic as well as analytical study -- otherwise the felt dimension will be missing. We will consider how such tacit knowledge can be articulated, documented and shared. To ground the discussion firmly in the felt experience of our own practice, the work-shop is organised as a joint practical design work session, supported by analytical study.

Keywords
Design theory, Soma-based interaction, Somaesthetics, Felt, Human engineering, Philosophical aspects, Analytical studies, Interaction design, Movement-based interactions, Physical rehabilitation, Tacit knowledge, Computation theory
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-29774 (URN)10.1145/3027063.3027082 (DOI)2-s2.0-85019570374 (Scopus ID)9781450346566 (ISBN)
Conference
2017 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2017, 6 May 2017 through 11 May 2017, Denver, Colorado, USA
Available from: 2017-08-11 Created: 2017-08-11 Last updated: 2019-01-22Bibliographically approved
Höök, K., Jonsson, M., Ståhl, A., Tholander, J., Robertson, T., Marti, P., . . . Poonkhin Khut, G. (2016). Move to be moved. In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at 34th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2016), May 7-12, 2016, San Jose, US (pp. 3301-3308).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Move to be moved
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2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2016, p. 3301-3308Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Movement-based design is reaching critical mass in HCI, and we can start to identify strategies, similarities and differences in how it is approached. Similarities may include, for example, a strong first person perspective on design, emphasising movement, somatics and aesthetic sensibilities of the designer, as well as starting from the premise that our bodily ways of being in the world are shaped by the ecologies of people, cultural practices and the artefacts we create and use. Different classes of systems are starting to emerge, such as spurring somaesthetic appreciation processes using biofeedback loops or carefully nudging us to interact with our own movements; engaging us in affective loops where the technology takes on a stronger agency, attempting to pull participants into particular experiences; extending on our senses and perception – even creating new senses through technology; social interactions, engaging us to jointly explore movement or touch; even endowing machines with their own ‘somatics’, exploring our relationship to technology; as well as engaging in larger political issues around the body, such as gender perspectives, or challenging the mind-body divide.

Keywords
Movement-based interaction, somaesthetic design, gender-sensitive design
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-32440 (URN)10.1145/2851581.2856470 (DOI)978-1-4503-4082-3 (ISBN)
Conference
34th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2016), May 7-12, 2016, San Jose, US
Available from: 2017-10-31 Created: 2017-10-31 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Höök, K., Jonsson, M., Ståhl, A. & Mercurio, J. (2016). Somaesthetic Appreciation Design (10ed.). In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2016), May 7-12, 2016, San Jose, US (pp. 3131-3142).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Somaesthetic Appreciation Design
2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2016, 10, p. 3131-3142Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We propose a strong concept we name Somaesthetic Appreciation based on three different enquiries. First, our own autobiographical design enquiry, using Feldenkrais as a resource in our design process, bringing out the Soma Carpet and Breathing Light applications. Second, through bringing in others to experience our systems, engaging with and qualitatively analysing their experiences of our applications. In our third enquiry, we try to pin down what characterizes and sets Somaesthetic Appreciation designs apart through comparing with and analysing others’ design inquiries as well as grounding them in the somaesthetic theories. We propose that the Somaesthetic Appreciation designs share a subtleness in how they encourage and spur bodily inquiry in their choice of interaction modalities, they require an intimate correspondence – feedback and interactions that follow the rhythm of the body, they entail a distinct manner of making space shutting out the outside world – metaphorically and literally – to allow users to turn their attention inwards, and they rely on articulation of bodily experiences to encourage learning and increased somatic awareness.

Keywords
Somaesthetic design, body awareness, strong concept
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-24566 (URN)10.1145/2858036.2858583 (DOI)978-1-4503-3362-7 (ISBN)
Conference
2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2016), May 7-12, 2016, San Jose, US
Projects
Somaesthetics
Available from: 2016-10-31 Created: 2016-10-31 Last updated: 2019-06-26Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, M., Ståhl, A., Mercurio, J., Karlsson, A., Naveen, R. & Höök, K. (2016). The Aesthetics of Heat: Guiding Awareness with Thermal Stimuli (10ed.). In: Proceedings of the TEI '16: Tenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction. Paper presented at Tenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction (TEI 2016), February 14-17, 2016, Eindhoven, Netherlands (pp. 109-117).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Aesthetics of Heat: Guiding Awareness with Thermal Stimuli
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2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the TEI '16: Tenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, 2016, 10, p. 109-117Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we discuss the design process and results from a design exploration on the use of thermal stimuli in body awareness exercises. A user-study was performed on an interactive prototype in the form of an interactive heat mat. The paper brings forth an alternative understanding of heat as a design material that extends the common understanding of thermal stimuli in HCI as a communication modality to instead bring the aesthetic and experiential properties to the fore. Findings account for felt body experiences of thermal stimuli and a number of design qualities related to heat as a design material are formulated, pointing to experiential qualities concerning the felt body, subjectivity and subtleness as well as material qualities concerning materiality, inertia and heat transfer

Keywords
Thermal stimuli, heat, somaesthetics, body awareness, aestehtics
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-24555 (URN)10.1145/2839462.2839487 (DOI)978-1-4503-3582-9 (ISBN)
Conference
Tenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction (TEI 2016), February 14-17, 2016, Eindhoven, Netherlands
Projects
Somaesthetics
Available from: 2016-10-31 Created: 2016-10-31 Last updated: 2019-06-26Bibliographically approved
Ståhl, A., Jonsson, M., Mercurio, J., Karlsson, A., Höök, K. & Banka Johnson, E.-C. (2016). The Soma Mat and Breathing Light (11ed.). In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2016), May 7-12, 2016, 2016, San jose, US (pp. 305-308).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Soma Mat and Breathing Light
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2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2016, 11, p. 305-308Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We present the experience of using the prototypes Soma Mat and Breathing Light. These are designed with a somaesthetic approach to support a meditative bodily introspection. We use light and heat as modalities to subtly guide participants to turn their gaze inwards, to their own bodies. People trying our prototypes reports on a feeling of relaxation, softer movements, and an increased awareness of their own breathing.

Keywords
Somaesthetic design, body awareness, somaeasthetic experience, relaxation, bodily introspection
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-24565 (URN)10.1145/2851581.2889464 (DOI)978-1-4503-4082-3 (ISBN)
Conference
2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2016), May 7-12, 2016, 2016, San jose, US
Projects
Somaesthetics
Available from: 2016-10-31 Created: 2016-10-31 Last updated: 2019-06-26Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6203-0780

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