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Rad, M. & Sonesson, U. (2024). Drivers of a more sustainable future food system – Lessons from Sweden. Journal of Cleaner Production, 462, Article ID 142639.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Drivers of a more sustainable future food system – Lessons from Sweden
2024 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 462, article id 142639Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The global food sector is one of the most impactful sectors in the world, necessitating an urgent shift towards more sustainable practices. Sweden has made great progress in putting sustainability on the agenda as a strategic component of its national development strategy. Still, understanding how a full-scale sustainable food system can be achieved in practice and the drivers of such a transition remain unclear. In this study, we first empirically explore these drivers, their interdependencies and how these affect the Swedish food system’s progress towards its sustainability objectives. Then, we assess which scenarios for the future food system in Sweden perform better with regard to sustainability considerations. For the first objective, we utilised the DEMATEL technique to identify and quantify the cause-and-effect relationships among these drivers. The results showed that revenue and the use of toxic materials are key drivers for food systems’ sustainability in Sweden, suggesting a path for system improvement focus areas in the future. For the second objective, we applied TOPSIS as a decision-making method for assessing the sustainability of four different future scenarios for the Swedish food system. The outcomes suggest that food tech is the most sustainable scenario among the ones considered. The findings of this study will collectively aid in promoting sustainable consumption, encouraging a shift towards a more sustainable agrifood system in Sweden, a leading nation in sustainability efforts. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2024
Keywords
Decision making; Toxic materials; DEMATEL; Development strategies; Food sector; Food system; Multi-criteria decision analysis; National development; Sustainability assessment; Sustainable practices; Swedishs; TOPSIS; Sustainable development
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-73608 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2024.142639 (DOI)2-s2.0-85194543031 (Scopus ID)
Note

This study was performed as part of the research programme MISTRA Food Futures (www.mistrafoodfutures.org) and was funded by MISTRA – The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research. We gratefully acknowledge all survey respondents. Additionally, in the process of constructing the literature review for the identification of indicators, we leveraged the resources of a separate research initiative supported by the Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning (Formas) within the national centre FINEST – Food Innovation for Sustainable System Transition [Grant no. 2020-02839]. 

Available from: 2024-06-17 Created: 2024-06-17 Last updated: 2024-06-17Bibliographically approved
Åkesson, A., Donat-Vargas, C., Hallström, E., Sonesson, U., Widenfalk, A. & Wolk, A. (2023). Associations between dietary pesticide residue mixture exposure and mortality in a population-based prospective cohort of men and women. Environment International, 182, Article ID 108346.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between dietary pesticide residue mixture exposure and mortality in a population-based prospective cohort of men and women
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2023 (English)In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 182, article id 108346Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There is a concern that pesticide residues, regularly detected in foods, might pose a health risk to the consumer, but epidemiological evidence is limited. We assessed the associations between dietary exposure to a mixture of pesticide residues and mortality. Methods: Food consumption was assessed in 68,844 participants from the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men, 45–83 years at baseline (1997). Concentrations of pesticide residues detected in foods on the Swedish market (1996–1998), mainly fruits and vegetables, were obtained via monitoring programs. To assess mixture effects, we summed per food item the ratios of each single pesticide mean residue concentration divided by its acceptable daily intake to create for each participant a Dietary Pesticide Hazard Index (adjusted for energy intake and expressed per kilogram of body weight). Multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 %CI). Results: During 15 years of follow-up (1998–2014), a total of 16,527 deaths occurred, of which 6,238 were caused by cardiovascular disease (CVD) and 5,364 by cancer. Comparing extreme quintiles of Dietary Pesticide Hazard Index, the highest category was inversely associated with CVD mortality HR, 0.82 (95 % CI, 0.75–0.90) and with cancer mortality HR 0.82 (95 % CI 0.75–0.91). In analyses stratified by high/low Dietary Pesticide Hazard Index, similar inverse associations were observed by increasing fruit and vegetable consumption. Conclusions: We observed no indications that dietary exposure to pesticide residue mixtures was associated with increased mortality, nor any clear indications that the benefits of fruit and vegetable consumption on mortality was compromised. Yet, our results need to be interpreted with caution. © 2023 The Author(s)

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2023
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases; Diet; Dietary Exposure; Female; Fruit; Humans; Male; Neoplasms; Pesticide Residues; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Vegetables; Sweden; Chemical contamination; Diseases; Food supply; Fruits; Hazards; Health risks; Nutrition; Vegetables; dietary pesticide residue; pesticide residue; unclassified drug; pesticide residue; All-cause mortality; Dietary exposure; Dietary pesticide residue exposure; Fruit and vegetables; Hazard indices; Hazard ratio; Nutritional epidemiology; Pesticide residue; Specific-mortality; Swedishs; cohort analysis; consumption behavior; dietary intake; health risk; mortality; pesticide residue; pollution exposure; risk assessment; adult; all cause mortality; Article; caloric intake; cancer mortality; cardiovascular disease; cardiovascular mortality; cohort analysis; controlled study; dietary exposure; female; follow up; food intake; fruit; fruit consumption; human; male; malignant neoplasm; middle aged; population research; prospective study; vegetable; vegetable consumption; analysis; cardiovascular disease; chemistry; diet; dietary exposure; neoplasm; risk factor; Pesticides
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-68806 (URN)10.1016/j.envint.2023.108346 (DOI)2-s2.0-85179717765 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-00308Swedish Research Council, 2017-00822Swedish Research Council, 2017-00644
Note

The Swedish Research Council, Formas grant no 2016-00308, and the Swedish Research Council no 2017-00822 and 2017-00644 (SIMPLER) supported the study.

Available from: 2024-01-09 Created: 2024-01-09 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Hallström, E., Davis, J., Håkansson, N., Ahlgren, S., Åkesson, A., Wolk, A. & Sonesson, U. (2022). Dietary environmental impacts relative to planetary boundaries for six environmental indicators – A population-based study. Journal of Cleaner Production, 373, Article ID 133949.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dietary environmental impacts relative to planetary boundaries for six environmental indicators – A population-based study
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 373, article id 133949Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The environmental impact of Swedish diets was assessed for six indicators (greenhouse gas [GHG] emissions, cropland use, nitrogen application, phosphorus application, consumptive water use and extinction rate), using self-reported food intake within two population-based cohorts of men and women, 56–96 years of age. The dietary environmental impact was assessed in relation to per capita planetary boundaries, overall and by population subgroups, addressing the relative importance of specific foods and food groups. The total average dietary impact exceeded the planetary boundaries by 1.6 to 4-fold for five of the six environmental indicators; consumptive water use did not exceed the boundaries. Comparing the highest with lowest quintiles of the population impact showed >2.5-fold differences across all environmental indicators. Of the diet's total average environmental impact, animal-based, plant-based and discretionary foods accounted for 28–83%, 8–40% and 9–37%, respectively, across the six indicators. Animal-based foods dominated the impact on GHG emissions, cropland use and nitrogen and phosphorus application, while plant-based and discretionary foods contributed more to consumptive water use and extinction rate. Environmental impact was driven predominantly by consumption of red meat, dairy, fresh fruit and coffee. The findings show major challenges in affluent countries that have to be addressed to achieving sustainable food production systems and diets. They provide guidance on critical food groups, environmental indicators and population subgroups to prioritize in future efforts to reduce the environmental impact. © 2022 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2022
Keywords
Dietary intake, Environmental impact, Genders, Life cycle assessment, Planetary boundaries, Uncertainty, Animals, Gas emissions, Greenhouse gases, Nitrogen, Nutrition, Phosphorus, Dietary intakes, Environmental indicators, Extinction rates, Gender, Greenhouse gas emissions, Planetary boundary, Use rate, Water use, Life cycle
National Category
Renewable Bioenergy Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-60150 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2022.133949 (DOI)2-s2.0-85137173183 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Svenska Forskningsrådet Formas, 2016-00308; Funding details: Vetenskapsrådet, VR, 2017-00644; Funding details: Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet, SLU; Funding text 1: The authors want to acknowledge Emma Moberg at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences for providing LCA data on specific foods. Petra Forsblad at RISE is acknowledged for the assistance in graphical illustration. This work was supported by FORMAS: The Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning (grant number 2016-00308 ), whose support is greatly acknowledged. We recognize the National Research Infrastructure SIMPLER supported by the Swedish Research Council (grant number 2017-00644 ) for the use of databases from the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men.; Funding text 2: The authors want to acknowledge Emma Moberg at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences for providing LCA data on specific foods. Petra Forsblad at RISE is acknowledged for the assistance in graphical illustration. This work was supported by FORMAS: The Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning (grant number 2016-00308), whose support is greatly acknowledged. We recognize the National Research Infrastructure SIMPLER supported by the Swedish Research Council (grant number 2017-00644) for the use of databases from the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men.

Available from: 2022-09-29 Created: 2022-09-29 Last updated: 2023-06-08Bibliographically approved
Segerkvist, K., Hansson, H., Sonesson, U. & Gunnarsson, S. (2021). A systematic mapping of current literature on sustainability at farm-level in beef and lamb meat production. Sustainability, 13(5), Article ID 2488.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A systematic mapping of current literature on sustainability at farm-level in beef and lamb meat production
2021 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 5, article id 2488Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Beef and lamb meat production is associated with important cultural, economic and environmental impacts in most countries worldwide. However, it is also related with sustainability challenges. To enable cattle and sheep farming to develop in line with sustainability, existing knowledge need to be implemented and identified knowledge gaps filled. The purpose of this article was to systematically map the scientific literature on environmental, economic and social sustainability at farm-level beef and lamb meat production to identify knowledge gaps and to point to important future actions and areas of research. Papers published January 2000–August 2020 with a geographical origin in Europe, Northern America, and Australia-New Zealand were included. The systematic literature search resulted in a total of 1355 hits; however, after removing papers which were considered out of the scope of the study, and duplicate papers, only 22 and 11 papers related to beef and sheep farming, respectively were retained for further analysis. Of these, only 11 in total included all three sustainability dimensions. Several papers only mentioned one or two of the sustainability dimensions or put them in relation to that/those main dimension covered, thus limiting the extent to which possible synergies or tradeoffs between different sustainability aspects actually can be studied. This indicates a need for a more comprehensive approach when studying farm-level sustainability. Future research would benefit from a more holistic approach and include all dimensions of sustainability within the same study. Further, focus should also be on how to measure and assess sustainability aspects in a standardized way. © 2021 by the authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2021
Keywords
Animal welfare, Cattle, Life cycle assessment, Sheep, Sustainable production, environmental impact assessment, food production, holistic approach, knowledge based system, literature review, livestock farming, meat, sustainability, Australia, Europe, New Zealand
National Category
Animal and Dairy Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-52626 (URN)10.3390/su13052488 (DOI)2-s2.0-85102417720 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Svenska Forskningsrådet Formas, 2017-02017; Funding text 1: This research was funded by The Swedish Research Council Formas, grant number 2017-02017.

Available from: 2021-03-25 Created: 2021-03-25 Last updated: 2023-06-08Bibliographically approved
Hallström, E., Bajzelj, B., Håkansson, N., Sjons, J., Åkesson, A., Wolk, A. & Sonesson, U. (2021). Dietary climate impact: Contribution of foods and dietary patterns by gender and age in a Swedish population. Journal of Cleaner Production, 306, Article ID 127189.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dietary climate impact: Contribution of foods and dietary patterns by gender and age in a Swedish population
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2021 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 306, article id 127189Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dietary climate impact in a Swedish population (56–95 years old) was estimated based on self-reported food intake from 50 000 men and women within two population-based cohorts and on climate data, covering emissions from farm to fork, for 600 foods representative for the Swedish market. Aims were to assess variation in dietary climate impact between population groups and between food categories. Mean dietary climate impact was 2.0 tons of CO2e/person/year, with about a threefold variation between high and low impact individuals. Food loss and waste accounted for 18%. Older individuals and women on average had lower total dietary climate impact per year, while differences between gender were smaller per 1000 kcal. Climate impact was greatly affected by dietary composition and especially by the content of animal-based and discretionary foods, responsible for 71% and 12% of total climate impact, respectively. Results indicate a large potential for reduced climate impact by adopting realistic dietary patterns. Suggested strategies to reach climate goals include reduction of red meat and prioritising lower impact foods within meat, dairy and seafood categories, limited consumption of discretionary foods and decreased over-consumption of total calories, combined with improvements in production including reduction of food loss and waste.

Keywords
Diet, Food, Climate, Life cycle assessment, Gender, Age, Food waste
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-62452 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2021.127189 (DOI)2-s2.0-85105258576 (Scopus ID)
Note

This work was supported by FORMAS-The Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning (grant number 2016e00308) which support is greatly acknowledged. We acknowledge the National Research Infrastructure SIMPLER supported by the Swedish Research Council (grant number 2017e00644) for use of the databases from the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men

Available from: 2023-01-23 Created: 2023-01-23 Last updated: 2023-06-08Bibliographically approved
Hallström, E., Bajzelj, B., Håkansson, N., Sjons, J., Åkesson, A., Wolk, A. & Sonesson, U. (2021). Dietary climate impact: Contribution of foods and dietary patterns by gender and age in a Swedish population. Journal of Cleaner Production, 306, Article ID 127189.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dietary climate impact: Contribution of foods and dietary patterns by gender and age in a Swedish population
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 306, article id 127189Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dietary climate impact in a Swedish population (56–95 years old) was estimated based on self-reported food intake from 50 000 men and women within two population-based cohorts and on climate data, covering emissions from farm to fork, for 600 foods representative for the Swedish market. Aims were to assess variation in dietary climate impact between population groups and between food categories. Mean dietary climate impact was 2.0 tons of CO2e/person/year, with about a threefold variation between high and low impact individuals. Food loss and waste accounted for 18%. Older individuals and women on average had lower total dietary climate impact per year, while differences between gender were smaller per 1000 kcal. Climate impact was greatly affected by dietary composition and especially by the content of animal-based and discretionary foods, responsible for 71% and 12% of total climate impact, respectively. Results indicate a large potential for reduced climate impact by adopting realistic dietary patterns. Suggested strategies to reach climate goals include reduction of red meat and prioritising lower impact foods within meat, dairy and seafood categories, limited consumption of discretionary foods and decreased over-consumption of total calories, combined with improvements in production including reduction of food loss and waste.

Keywords
Diet, Food, Climate, Life cycle assessment, Gender, Age, Food waste
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-53132 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2021.127189 (DOI)2-s2.0-85105258576 (Scopus ID)
Note

Svenska Forskningsrådet Formas: 2016–00308. 

Vetenskapsrådet: VR2017–00644

Available from: 2021-05-26 Created: 2021-05-26 Last updated: 2024-04-10Bibliographically approved
Strid, A., Johansson, I., Bianchi, M. A., Sonesson, U., Hallström, E., Lindahl, B. & Winkvist, A. (2021). Diets benefiting health and climate relate to longevity in northern Sweden.. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 114(2), 515-529
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diets benefiting health and climate relate to longevity in northern Sweden.
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2021 (English)In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 114, no 2, p. 515-529Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Diets combining adequate nutritional quality and low climate impact are highly needed for human and planet health. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to 1) evaluate nutrient density indexes' ability to predict mortality, and 2) assess the effects of diets varying in nutrient density and climate impact on total mortality. METHODS: Dietary data from 49,124 women and 47,651 men aged 35-65 y in the population-based prospective study Västerbotten Intervention Programme (Sweden) were used. Greenhouse gas emissions (GHGEs) were estimated using data from life cycle assessments. Fifteen variants of nutrient density indexes were evaluated and the index that best predicted mortality was used to estimate participants' nutrient density. GHGEs and nutrient density were adjusted for energy intakes. Total mortality risk was estimated by Cox proportional hazards models for 4 groups of women and men, respectively, i.e., higher nutrient density, lower climate impact (HNutr/LClim); higher nutrient density, higher climate impact (HNutr/HClim); lower nutrient density, lower climate impact (LNutr/LClim); and lower nutrient density, higher climate impact (LNutr/HClim-reference group). RESULTS: NRF11.3, a Sweden-adapted variant of the Nutrient Rich Foods index, was identified to have the best ability to predict mortality in the study population. Median follow-up times for women and men were 16.0 and 14.7 y, respectively. For women a significantly lower mortality risk was found for HNutr/LClim (HR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.79, 0.96; P = 0.008) and HNutr/HClim (HR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.78, 0.97; P = 0.011) than for LNutr/HClim. Among men LNutr/LClim had a significantly higher mortality risk (HR: 1.10; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.21; P = 0.033) than LNutr/HClim. CONCLUSIONS: Diets beneficial for both health and climate are feasible and associated with lower mortality risk in women. Further studies are needed to understand how men may transition into diets that are more sustainable from a combined health and climate perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2021
Keywords
carbon dioxide equivalents, climate impact, diet quality, food frequency questionnaire, mortality, nutrient density index
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-56240 (URN)10.1093/ajcn/nqab073 (DOI)
Available from: 2021-09-01 Created: 2021-09-01 Last updated: 2023-06-08Bibliographically approved
Strid, A., Hallström, E., Sonesson, U., Sjons, J., Winkvist, A. & Bianchi, M. A. (2021). Sustainability indicators for foods benefiting climate and health. Sustainability, 13(7), Article ID 3621.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainability indicators for foods benefiting climate and health
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2021 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 7, article id 3621Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

New methods for combined evaluation of nutritional and environmental aspects of food products are needed to enable a transformation of dietary guidelines integrating both health and environmental perspectives. We evaluated two sustainability aspects; nutrition and climate im-pact, of foods commonly consumed in Sweden and the implications of using parallel or integrated assessments of these two aspects, also discussing the usability and suitability of these food sustain-ability indicators in relation to Swedish dietary guidelines, industry food product development, and consumer communication. There were large differences in both nutrient density and climate impact among the different foods. The parallel assessment easily visualized synergies and trade-offs between these two sustainability aspects for the different foods. Coherence with dietary guidelines was good, and suitability and usability deemed satisfying. The integrated indicator showed better coherence with dietary guidelines than indicators based solely on nutrient density or climate impact; however, the difficulty to interpret the score limits its usability in product development and consumer communication. With both methods, advantageous as well as less advantageous plant-based and animal-based food alternatives were suggested. The two alternative methods evaluated could serve as useful tools to drive individual and societal development towards more sustainable food production and consumption. © 2021 by the authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2021
Keywords
Carbon dioxide equivalents, Climate impact, LCA, Nutrient density index, Nutritional profiling, Sustainability indicators, climate change, climate effect, consumption behavior, food product, food production, guideline, nature-society relations, product development, public health, sustainability, trade-off, transformation, Sweden, Indicator indicator
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-52966 (URN)10.3390/su13073621 (DOI)2-s2.0-85103828101 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding details: R-18-26-133; Funding details: Svenska Forskningsrådet Formas, FR-2019/0007; Funding text 1: Funding: This research was funded by grants from The Swedish Foundation for Agricultural Research (grant no R-18-26-133), and The Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning (Formas, grant no FR-2019/0007). The funders had no role in the design of the study; in the collection, analyses, or interpretation of data; in the writing of the manuscript, or in the decision to publish the results.; Funding text 2: This research was funded by grants from The Swedish Foundation for Agricultural Research (grant no R-18-26-133), and The Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning (Formas, grant no FR-2019/0007). The funders had no role in the design of the study; in the collection, analyses, or interpretation of data; in the writing of the manuscript, or in the decision to publish the results. Data Availability Statement: Climate impact data described in the manuscript will not be madeThe authors want to acknowledge Anna Karin Lindroos at the Swedish National Food Agency, for providing unpublished data on added sugar for relevant food products and updated nutrient content information on enriched oat drink. Participants from participating companies Susanne Larson (IKEA), Ulrika Gunnerud (Fazer), Anna-Karin Modin Edman (Arla Foods), Christer Ros?n (Kron?gg) and Rebecka Persson (Orkla Foods) should be acknowledged as well for their assistance in suggesting more recent food products to analyze, as well as for their part in the discussion of the usability and suitability of the proposed methods.

Available from: 2021-04-21 Created: 2021-04-21 Last updated: 2023-06-08Bibliographically approved
Gunnarsson, S., Segerkvist, K., Wallgren, T., Hansson, H. & Sonesson, U. (2020). A systematic mapping of research on sustainability dimensions at farm-level in pig production. Sustainability, 12(11), Article ID 4352.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A systematic mapping of research on sustainability dimensions at farm-level in pig production
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2020 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 11, article id 4352Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We systematically mapped the scientific literature on the sustainability of pig production at farm-level. Sustainability was considered holistically, covering its economic, environmental, and social dimensions, each consisting of a broad range of different aspects that may contradict or reinforce each other. Literature published between January 2000 and March 2020 with a geographical focus on Europe, North America, Australia, and New Zealand was included. A standard template with predefined keywords was used to summarise aspects of each sustainability dimension covered in identified papers. We found that papers analysing environmental sustainability were more frequent than papers analysing economic or social sustainability. However, there are many different aspects within each dimension of sustainability, hampering comparisons between studies. In addition, each dimension of sustainability has many sides, making it difficult to compare different studies, and different dimensions and aspects may have complex interrelations. Our systematic literature review revealed that these interrelations are not well understood and that possible trade-offs or synergies between different aspects of sustainability dimensions remain unidentified. This systematic mapping of the current literature on farm-level sustainability in pig production can support a more informed discussion on knowledge gaps and help prioritise future research at farm-level to enhance sustainability in pig production. © 2020 by the authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2020
Keywords
Animal welfare, Ecology, Economic, Environment, Pork, Social, Swine
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-45078 (URN)10.3390/su12114352 (DOI)2-s2.0-85085762322 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet, SLU; Funding details: Svenska ForskningsrÃ¥det Formas, 2017-02017; Funding text 1: The Swedish Research Council Formas, grant number 2017-02017, funded this research. We thank Mattias Lennartsson, librarian at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, for valuable help during the process of developing the search strings.

Available from: 2020-06-30 Created: 2020-06-30 Last updated: 2023-06-08Bibliographically approved
Hjorth, T., Huseinovic, E., Hallström, E., Strid, A., Johansson, I., Lindahl, B., . . . Winkvist, A. (2020). Changes in dietary carbon footprint over ten years relative to individual characteristics and food intake in the Västerbotten Intervention Programme. Scientific Reports, 10(1), Article ID 20.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in dietary carbon footprint over ten years relative to individual characteristics and food intake in the Västerbotten Intervention Programme
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2020 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective was to examine 10-year changes in dietary carbon footprint relative to individual characteristics and food intake in the unique longitudinal Västerbotten Intervention Programme, Sweden. Here, 14 591 women and 13 347 men had been followed over time. Food intake was assessed via multiple two study visits 1996–2016, using a 64-item food frequency questionnaire. Greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE) related to food intake, expressed as kg carbon dioxide equivalents/1000 kcal and day, were estimated. Participants were classified into GHGE quintiles within sex and 10-year age group strata at both visits. Women and men changing from lowest to highest GHGE quintile exhibited highest body mass index within their quintiles at first visit, and the largest increase in intake of meat, minced meat, chicken, fish and butter and the largest decrease in intake of potatoes, rice and pasta. Women and men changing from highest to lowest GHGE quintile exhibited basically lowest rates of university degree and marriage and highest rates of smoking within their quintiles at first visit. Among these, both sexes reported the largest decrease in intake of meat, minced meat and milk, and the largest increase in intake of snacks and, for women, sweets. More research is needed on how to motivate dietary modifications to reduce climate impact and support public health. © 2020, The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Research, 2020
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-43354 (URN)10.1038/s41598-019-56924-8 (DOI)2-s2.0-85077597900 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Forskningsrådet om Hälsa, Arbetsliv och Välfärd, FORTE; Funding details: Västerbotten Läns Landsting; Funding details: Vetenskapsrådet, VR; Funding text 1: The authors want to acknowledge teams at Västerbotten County Council for collecting data and organizing Västerbotten Intervention Programme, and the personnel at the Department of Biobank Research, Umeå University for data maintenance and administrative support. The Northern Sweden Diet Database was supported by the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare and the Swedish Research Council. The funders had no role in the design, analysis or writing of this article.

Available from: 2020-01-30 Created: 2020-01-30 Last updated: 2023-06-08Bibliographically approved
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