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Bergvall, N., Cheah, Y. W., Bernlind, C., Bernlind, A., Olsson, L., Creaser, D., . . . Öhrman, O. G. (2024). Upgrading of fast pyrolysis bio-oils to renewable hydrocarbons using slurry- and fixed bed hydroprocessing. Fuel processing technology, 253, Article ID 108009.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Upgrading of fast pyrolysis bio-oils to renewable hydrocarbons using slurry- and fixed bed hydroprocessing
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2024 (English)In: Fuel processing technology, ISSN 0378-3820, E-ISSN 1873-7188, Vol. 253, article id 108009Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Liquefaction of lignocellulosic biomass through fast pyrolysis, to yield fast pyrolysis bio-oil (FPBO), is a technique that has been extensively researched in the quest for finding alternatives to fossil feedstocks to produce fuels, chemicals, etc. Properties such as high oxygen content, acidity, and poor storage stability greatly limit the direct use of this bio-oil. Furthermore, high coking tendencies make upgrading of the FPBO by hydrodeoxygenation in fixed-bed bed hydrotreaters challenging due to plugging and catalyst deactivation. This study investigates a novel two-step hydroprocessing concept; a continuous slurry-based process using a dispersed NiMo-catalyst, followed by a fixed bed process using a supported NiMo-catalyst. The oil product from the slurry-process, having a reduced oxygen content (15 wt%) compared to the FPBO and a comparatively low coking tendency (TGA residue of 1.4 wt%), was successfully processed in the downstream fixed bed process for 58 h without any noticeable decrease in catalyst activity, or increase in pressure drop. The overall process resulted in a 29 wt% yield of deoxygenated oil product (0.5 wt% oxygen) from FPBO with an overall carbon recovery of 68%.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2024
Keywords
Biofuel, Deoxygenation, Hydroprocessing, Pyrolysis, Renewable, Slurry, Biofuels, Catalyst deactivation, Fuel storage, Oxygen, Deoxygenations, Fast pyrolysis bio-oil, Fixed bed, Fixed-bed process, Lignocellulosic biomass, Ni-Mo catalyst, Oil product, Oxygen content, Catalyst activity
National Category
Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-71914 (URN)10.1016/j.fuproc.2023.108009 (DOI)2-s2.0-85179611112 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 41253-2
Note

 Correspondence Address: N. Bergvall; Research Institutes of Sweden AB, Borås, Box 857, SE-501 15, Sweden; This work was funded by the Swedish Energy Agency, project number 41253-2

Available from: 2024-02-22 Created: 2024-02-22 Last updated: 2024-05-17Bibliographically approved
Dimitriadis, A., Bergvall, N., Johansson, A.-C., Sandström, L., Bezergianni, S., Tourlakidis, N., . . . Raymakers, L. (2023). Biomass conversion via ablative fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing towards refinery integration: Industrially relevant scale validation. Fuel, 332, Article ID 126153.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biomass conversion via ablative fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing towards refinery integration: Industrially relevant scale validation
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2023 (English)In: Fuel, ISSN 0016-2361, E-ISSN 1873-7153, Vol. 332, article id 126153Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reducing the use of fossil fuels is an ongoing and important effort considering the environmental impact and depletion of fossil-based resources. The combination of ablative fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing is explored as a pathway allowing bio-based intermediates (BioMates) integration in underlying petroleum refineries. The proposed technology is validated in industrially relevant scale, identifying pros and cons towards its commercialization. Straw from wheat, rye and barley was fed to ablative fast pyrolysis rendering Fast Pyrolysis Bio-Oil (FPBO) as the main product. The FPBO was stabilized via slurry hydroprocessing, rendering a stabilized FPBO (sFPBO) with 49 % reduced oxygen content, 71 % reduced carbonyl content and 49 % reduced Conradson carbon residue. Fixed bed catalytic hydroprocessing of sFPBO resulted in the production of BioMates, a high bio-content product to be co-fed in established refinery units. Compared to the starting biomass, BioMates has 83.6 wt% C content increase, 92.5 wt% O content decrease, 93.0 wt% water content decrease, while the overall technology has 20 wt% conversion yield (32 wt% carbon yield) from biomass to BioMates. © 2022 The Author(s)

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2023
Keywords
Green fuel, Hydrodeoxygenation, Hydroprocessing, Refinery intermediate, Straw, pyrolysis bio-oil, Bioconversion, Carbon, Environmental impact, Fossil fuels, Pyrolysis, Refining, Bio-based, Biomass conversion, Fast pyrolysis, Fast pyrolysis bio-oil, Pyrolysis bio-oil, Straw, pyrolyse bio-oil, Biomass
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-61190 (URN)10.1016/j.fuel.2022.126153 (DOI)2-s2.0-85139857301 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding details: Horizon 2020 Framework Programme, H2020; Funding details: Horizon 2020, 2022, 727463; Funding text 1: The authors wish to express their appreciation for the financial support provided by European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement No 727463 for the project “BIOMATES”.; Funding text 2: The authors wish to express their appreciation for the financial support provided by European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement No 727463 for the project “BIOMATES”. 

Available from: 2022-12-06 Created: 2022-12-06 Last updated: 2023-05-26Bibliographically approved
Yang, H., Nurdiawati, A., Gond, R., Chen, S., Wang, S., Tang, B., . . . Han, T. (2023). Carbon-negative valorization of biomass waste into affordable green hydrogen and battery anodes. International journal of hydrogen energy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbon-negative valorization of biomass waste into affordable green hydrogen and battery anodes
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2023 (English)In: International journal of hydrogen energy, ISSN 0360-3199, E-ISSN 1879-3487Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The global Sustainable Development Goals highlight the necessity for affordable and clean energy, designated as SDG7. A sustainable and feasible biorefinery concept is proposed for the carbon-negative utilization of biomass waste for affordable H2 and battery anode material production. Specifically, an innovative tandem biocarbon + NiAlO + biocarbon catalyst strategy is constructed to realize a complete reforming of biomass pyro-vapors into H2+CO (as a mixture). The solid residues from pyrolysis are upgraded into high-quality hard carbon (HCs), demonstrating potential as sodium ion battery (SIBs) anodes. The product, HC-1600-6h, exhibited great electrochemical performance when employed as (SIBs) anodes (full cell: 263 Wh/kg with ICE of 89%). Ultimately, a comprehensive process is designed, simulated, and evaluated. The process yields 75 kg H2, 169 kg HCs, and 891 kg captured CO2 per ton of biomass achieving approx. 100% carbon and hydrogen utilization efficiencies. A life cycle assessment estimates a biomass valorization process with negative-emissions (−0.81 kg CO2/kg-biomass, reliant on Sweden wind electricity). A techno-economic assessment forecasts a notably profitable process capable of co-producing affordable H2 and hard carbon battery anodes. The payback period of the process is projected to fall within two years, assuming reference prices of 13.7 €/kg for HCs and 5 €/kg for H2. The process contributes to a novel business paradigm for sustainable and commercially viable biorefinery process, achieving carbon-negative valorization of biomass waste into affordable energy and materials.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2023
Keywords
Anodes; Bioconversion; Biomass; Carbon dioxide; Investments; Life cycle; Metal ions; Refining; Sodium-ion batteries; Affordable energy; Battery anodes; Biocarbon; Biomass wastes; Biorefineries; Energy; Hard carbon; Negative emission; Sodium ion batteries; Valorisation; Carbon
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-67666 (URN)10.1016/j.ijhydene.2023.09.096 (DOI)2-s2.0-85172247785 (Scopus ID)
Note

Financial supported by VINNOVA- the Swedish innovation fund Agency with project number 2021-03735 is highly appreciated. One of the authors, Hanmin Yang would like to acknowledge the financial support from the Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC) and Stiftelsen Energitekniskt Centrum i Piteå, Sweden.

Available from: 2023-11-30 Created: 2023-11-30 Last updated: 2023-11-30Bibliographically approved
Johansson, A.-C., Bergvall, N., Molinder, R., Wikberg, E., Niinipuu, M. & Sandström, L. (2023). Comparison of co-refining of fast pyrolysis oil from Salix via catalytic cracking and hydroprocessing. Biomass and Bioenergy, 172, Article ID 106753.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of co-refining of fast pyrolysis oil from Salix via catalytic cracking and hydroprocessing
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2023 (English)In: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, E-ISSN 1873-2909, Vol. 172, article id 106753Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lignocellulosic biomass from energy crops, i.e., short rotation coppice willows such as Salix spp., can be used as feedstock for production of transportation biofuels. Biomass conversion via fast pyrolysis followed by co-refining with fossil oil in existing refinery infrastructure could enable a fast introduction of large-scale production of biofuels. In this study, Salix was first liquefied using ablative fast pyrolysis in a pilot scale unit. The resulting pyrolysis oil, rich in oxygenates, was thereafter co-refined in 20 wt% ratio with fossil feedstock using two separate technologies, a fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) laboratory unit and a continuous slurry hydroprocessing pilot plant. In the FCC route, the pyrolysis oil was cracked at 798 K using a commercial FCC catalyst at atmospheric pressure, while in the hydroprocessing route, the oil was processed at 693 K and a hydrogen pressure of 15 MPa in the presence of an unsupported molybdenum sulfide catalyst. Both routes resulted in significant deoxygenation (97 wt% versus 93 wt%). It is feasible to co-refine pyrolysis oil using both methods, the main difference being that the hydroprocessing results in a significantly higher biogenic carbon yield from the pyrolysis oil to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon products (92 wt%) but would in turn require input of H2. In the cracking route, besides the liquid product, a significant part of the biogenic carbon ends up as gas and as coke on the catalyst. The choice of route depends, among other factors, on the available amount of bio-oil and refining infrastructures. © 2023 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2023
Keywords
Biofuels, Co-refining, Fast pyrolysis, Fluidized catalytic cracking, Hydroprocessing, Salix, Atmospheric pressure, Bioconversion, Carbon, Catalysts, Crops, Feedstocks, Fluidization, Fluidized beds, Molybdenum compounds, Pilot plants, Refining, Sulfur compounds, Biogenics, Fast pyrolysis oil, Fluidized catalytic crackings, Lignocellulosic biomass, Pyrolysis oil, ]+ catalyst, biofuel, catalyst, cracking (fracture), pyrolysis, refining industry
National Category
Renewable Bioenergy Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-64320 (URN)10.1016/j.biombioe.2023.106753 (DOI)2-s2.0-85150046232 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Correspondence Address: Johansson, A.-C.; RISE AB, Box 726, Piteå, Sweden; email: ann-christine.johansson@ri.se; Funding details: Svenska Forskningsrådet Formas, 2016-20031; Funding text 1: This study was supported by the Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning (Formas) under the grant number 2016-20031 . 

Available from: 2023-05-08 Created: 2023-05-08 Last updated: 2024-03-04Bibliographically approved
Yang, H., Cui, Y., Jin, Y., Lu, X., Han, T., Sandström, L., . . . Yang, W. (2023). Evaluation of Engineered Biochar-Based Catalysts for Syngas Production in a Biomass Pyrolysis and Catalytic Reforming Process. Energy & Fuels
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of Engineered Biochar-Based Catalysts for Syngas Production in a Biomass Pyrolysis and Catalytic Reforming Process
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2023 (English)In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Biochar, originating from biomass pyrolysis, has been proven a promising catalyst for tar cracking/reforming with great coke resistance. This work aims to evaluate various engineered biochar-based catalysts on syngas production in a biomass pyrolysis and catalytic reforming process without feeding extra steam. The tested engineered biochar catalysts include physical- and chemical-activated, nitrogen-doped, and nickel-doped biochars. The results illustrated that the syngas yields were comparable when using biochar and activated biochar as catalysts. A relatively high specific surface area (SSA) and a hierarchical porous structure are beneficial for syngas and hydrogen production. A 2 h physical-activated biochar catalyst induced the syngas with the highest H2/CO ratio (1.5). The use of N-doped biochar decreased the syngas yield sharply due to the collapse of the pore structure but obtained syngas with the highest LHVgas (18.5MJ/Nm3). The use of Ni-doped biochar facilitated high syngas and hydrogen yields (78.2 wt % and 26 mmol H2/g-biomass) and improved gas energy conversion efficiency (73%). Its stability and durability test showed a slight decrease in performance after a three-time repetitive use. A future experiment with a longer time is suggested to determine when the catalyst will finally deactivate and how to reduce the catalyst deterioration. © 2023 The Authors. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society, 2023
Keywords
Biomass, Catalysts, Catalytic reforming, Deterioration, Doping (additives), Durability, Energy conversion efficiency, Hydrogen production, Pore structure, Steam reforming, Activated nitrogen, Biochar, Biomass pyrolysis, Coke resistances, Engineered biochar, Reforming process, Syn gas, Syngas production, Tar cracking, ]+ catalyst, Synthesis gas
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-64341 (URN)10.1021/acs.energyfuels.3c00410 (DOI)2-s2.0-85151322199 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: 51418-1; Funding details: China Scholarship Council, CSC; Funding text 1: The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support by the Swedish Energy Agency─Energimyndigheten with project number 51418-1. One of the authors, Hanmin Yang, would like to acknowledge the financial support from the Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC) and Stiftelsen Energitekniskt Centrum i Piteå, Sweden.

Available from: 2023-05-05 Created: 2023-05-05 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Shafaghat, H., Linderberg, M., Janosik, T., Hedberg, M., Wiinikka, H., Sandström, L. & Johansson, A.-C. (2022). Enhanced Biofuel Production via Catalytic Hydropyrolysis and Hydro-Coprocessing. Energy & Fuels, 36(1), 450-462
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enhanced Biofuel Production via Catalytic Hydropyrolysis and Hydro-Coprocessing
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2022 (English)In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 450-462Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In order to successfully integrate biomass pyrolysis oils as starting materials for conventional oil refineries, upgrading of the pyrolysis oils is needed to achieve desired properties, something which can be performed either as part of the pyrolysis process and/or by separate catalytic treatment of the pyrolysis intermediate oil products. In this study, the quality of stem wood-derived pyrolysis oil was improved via ex situ catalytic hydropyrolysis in a bench-scale pyrolyzer (stage 1), followed by catalytic hydro-coprocessing with fossil co-feed in a laboratory-scale high pressure autoclave (stage 2). The effect of pyrolysis upgrading conditions was investigated based on the quality of intermediate products and their suitability for hydro-coprocessing. HZSM-5 and Pt/TiO2 catalysts (400 °C, atmospheric pressure) were employed for ex situ pyrolysis, and the NiMoS/Al2O3 catalyst (330 °C, 100 bar H2 initial pressure) was used for hydro-coprocessing of the pyrolysis oil. The application of HZSM-5 in the pyrolysis of stem wood under a N2 atmosphere decreased the formation of acids, ketones, aldehydes, and furans and increased the production of aromatic hydrocarbons and phenolics (guaiacols and phenols). Replacing HZSM-5 with Pt/TiO2 and N2 with H2 resulted in complete conversion of guaiacols and significant production of phenols, with further indications of increased stability and reduced coking tendencies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society, 2022
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-57373 (URN)10.1021/acs.energyfuels.1c03263 (DOI)2-s2.0-85122002259 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-12-22 Created: 2021-12-22 Last updated: 2023-06-08Bibliographically approved
Yang, H., Cui, Y., Han, T., Sandström, L., Jönsson, P. & Yang, W. (2022). High-purity syngas production by cascaded catalytic reforming of biomass pyrolysis vapors. Applied Energy, 322, Article ID 119501.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High-purity syngas production by cascaded catalytic reforming of biomass pyrolysis vapors
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2022 (English)In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 322, article id 119501Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A novel pyrolysis followed by in-line cascaded catalytic reforming process without additional steam was developed to produce high-purity syngas from woody biomass. The key to the proposed process is the construction of a cascaded biochar + NiAl2O4 catalytic reforming process in which biochar acts as a pre-reforming catalyst, and NiAl2O4 acts as a primary reforming catalyst. The large oxygenates in the pyro-vapors are deeply cracked in the biochar layer due to the increased residence time in the hot-biochar bed. The remaining small molecules are then reformed with the autogenerated steam from pyrolysis catalyzed by the reduced Ni0 species in the NiAl2O4 catalyst (NiAlO). The results showed that the yield of syngas for the optimized process was 71.28 wt% (including 44.44 mg-H2/g-biomass and 536.48 mg-CO/g-biomass), and the CO2 yield of the process was only 3 kg-CO2/kg-hydrogen. High-purity syngas with 89.47 vol% of (H2 + CO) was obtained, and the gas energy conversion efficiency (GECE) of the process reached 75.65%. The study shows that in the cascaded catalytic reforming process, cracking of the large oxygenates and reforming of the small molecules are promoted sequentially in separated biochar + NiAlO catalyst layers, which maximizes the syngas production and improves the activity and stability of the Ni-based catalyst. © 2022 The Author(s)

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2022
Keywords
Biomass, Cascaded catalysts, Pyrolysis, Reforming, Syngas, Aluminum compounds, Carbon dioxide, Catalysts, Catalytic reforming, Conversion efficiency, Molecules, Nickel compounds, Synthesis gas, Biochar, Biomass pyrolysis, Cascaded catalyst, High purity, Reforming Catalyst, Reforming process, Small molecules, Syn gas, Syngas production, ]+ catalyst, catalysis, catalyst, gas production, inorganic compound
National Category
Bioenergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-59823 (URN)10.1016/j.apenergy.2022.119501 (DOI)2-s2.0-85132935348 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding details: 51418-1; Funding details: China Scholarship Council, CSC; Funding text 1: We gratefully acknowledge the financial support by the Swedish Energy Agency – Energimyndigheten with project number 51418-1. One of the authors, Hanmin Yang would like to acknowledge the financial support from the Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC) and Stiftelsen Energitekniskt Centrum i Piteå, Sweden.

Available from: 2022-08-04 Created: 2022-08-04 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Yang, H., Han, T., Shi, Z., Sun, Y., Jiang, J., Sandström, L., . . . Yang, W. (2022). In situ catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignin over biochar and activated carbon derived from the identical process. Fuel processing technology, 227, Article ID 107103.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In situ catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignin over biochar and activated carbon derived from the identical process
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2022 (English)In: Fuel processing technology, ISSN 0378-3820, E-ISSN 1873-7188, Vol. 227, article id 107103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, a sustainable in situ catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) of lignin was developed by using biochar and activated carbon (AC) as catalysts, which is derived from the same CFP of lignin process. The results showed that using biochar as the catalyst mainly promoted the production of non-condensable gas, water, and guaiacol-rich oil regardless of the biochar-to-lignin ratio. The catalytic effect of the biochar was mainly attributed to the surface sodium and alkali metals. Using AC44.7% and AC48.6% as the catalyst resulted in a high yield of guaiacol-rich oil, whereas using AC64.3% induced a great decrease of the tarry oil yield and a significant increase of the phenol concentration in bio-oil. The diffusion efficiency of the reactive intermediates inside the catalysts determined by the pore size was believed to be the greatest determinant of the catalytic performance of the ACs. The mesopores were large enough to allow most of the reactive intermediates to diffuse quickly and react. Moreover, by using the same catalyst, char agglomeration was almost completely suppressed after in situ CFP. Two major problems, tar production and char agglomeration, which limit the large-scale application of fast lignin pyrolysis are believed to be solved. © 2021 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2022
Keywords
Activated carbon, Biochar, In situ CFP, Lignin, Agglomeration, Alcohols, Catalysts, Pore size, Pyrolysis, Reaction intermediates, Catalytic effects, Fast pyrolysis, Gas-water, Higher yield, Identical process, In situ catalytic fast pyrolyse, Noncondensable gas, Reactive intermediate, ]+ catalyst
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-57327 (URN)10.1016/j.fuproc.2021.107103 (DOI)2-s2.0-85120438304 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Svenska Forskningsrådet Formas; Funding details: Government of Jiangsu Province, BK 20180154; Funding details: China Scholarship Council, CSC; Funding details: Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province; Funding text 1: Financial support from FORMAS, the Swedish research council for sustainable development, and the Natural Science Foundation, Jiangsu Province (BK 20180154), China, are greatly appreciated. One of the authors, Hanmin Yang, also would like to acknowledge the financial support from the Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC).

Available from: 2021-12-16 Created: 2021-12-16 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Yang, H., Han, T., Yang, W., Sandström, L. & Jönsson, P. G. (2022). Influence of the porosity and acidic properties of aluminosilicate catalysts on coke formation during the catalytic pyrolysis of lignin. Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis, 165, Article ID 105536.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of the porosity and acidic properties of aluminosilicate catalysts on coke formation during the catalytic pyrolysis of lignin
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis, ISSN 0165-2370, E-ISSN 1873-250X, Vol. 165, article id 105536Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Five aluminosilicate catalysts with different textural and acidic properties are used to study the influence of their acidic and porous properties on the coke formation during the fast catalytic pyrolysis of lignin. The competition between coke formation and target product (hydrocarbons) formation in regard to different pore sizes and Si/Al ratios is classified via performing X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption-desorption, pyrolysis–gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (Py-GCMS), kinetic calculations, and thermogravimetric (TG)/temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) measurements. The results indicated that a pore size consistent with the critical diameters of the pyrolysis products of lignin is a prerequisite for a catalyst to reach a high selectivity for the desired products with less coke formation. A relatively large pore size can cause severe coke formation; however, large pores are favorable for increasing the reaction rate by increasing the diffusion efficiency. A catalyst with sufficient acidity is also essential for high selectivity towards target products. © 2022 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2022
Keywords
Acidity, Aluminosilicates, Coke formation, Lignin, Pore size, Catalyst selectivity, Coke, Gas adsorption, Gas chromatography, Mass spectrometry, Pyrolysis, Temperature programmed desorption, Acidic properties, Aluminosilicate catalysts, Catalytic pyrolysis, High selectivity, Hydrocarbon formation, Porosity properties, Porous properties, Textural properties, ]+ catalyst, Formation, Products, Selectivity
National Category
Other Chemistry Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-59324 (URN)10.1016/j.jaap.2022.105536 (DOI)2-s2.0-85129941106 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding details: 47971-1; Funding details: European Commission, EC; Funding details: China Scholarship Council, CSC; Funding text 1: We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Swedish Energy Agency – Energimyndigheten with project number 47971-1 and the EU project BRISK 2. One of the authors, Hanmin Yang, would like to acknowledge the financial support from the Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC) and Stiftelsen Energitekniskt Centrum i Piteå , Sweden.

Available from: 2022-06-20 Created: 2022-06-20 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Bergvall, N., Sandström, L., Cheah, Y. W. & Öhrman, O. (2022). Slurry Hydroconversion of Solid Kraft Lignin to Liquid Products Using Molybdenum- and Iron-Based Catalysts. Energy & Fuels, 36(17), 10226
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Slurry Hydroconversion of Solid Kraft Lignin to Liquid Products Using Molybdenum- and Iron-Based Catalysts
2022 (English)In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 36, no 17, p. 10226-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Kraft lignin is an abundantly available and largely underutilized renewable material with potential for production of biobased fuels and chemicals. This study reports the results of a series of slurry hydroprocessing experiments with the aim of converting solid Kraft lignin to liquid products suitable for downstream refining in more conventional reactors. Experiments reported in this study were conducted by feeding a lignin slurry to an already hot, liquid-filled reactor to provide momentaneous heating of the lignin to the reaction temperature. This modified batch procedure provided superior results compared to the regular batch experiments, likely since unwanted repolymerization and condensation reactions of the lignin during the heating phase was avoided, and was therefore used for most of the experiments reported. Experiments were performed using both an unsupported Mo-sulfide catalyst and Fe-based catalysts (bauxite and hematite) at varied reaction temperatures, pressures, and catalyst loadings. The use of Mo-sulfide (0.1% Mo of the entire feed mass) at 425 °C and 50 bar resulted in complete conversion of the Kraft lignin to nonsolid products. Very high conversions (>95%) could also be achieved with both sulfided bauxite or hematite at the same temperature and pressure, but this required much higher catalyst loadings (6.25% bauxite or 4.3% hematite of the total feed mass), and around 99% conversion could be achieved at higher temperatures but at the expense of much higher gas yields. Although requiring much higher loadings, the results in this study suggest that comparatively nonexpensive Fe-based catalysts may be an attractive alternative for a slurry-based process aimed at the hydroconversion of solid lignin to liquid products. Possible implementation strategies for a slurry-based hydroconversion process are proposed and discussed. © 2022 The Authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society, 2022
National Category
Chemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-60192 (URN)10.1021/acs.energyfuels.2c01664 (DOI)2-s2.0-85136643686 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding details: Energimyndigheten, 41253-2; Funding text 1: This work was made possible with funding from the Swedish Energy Agency, project no. 41253-2, and from Preem. Special acknowledgements should be addressed to Anders Ahlbom and Dr. Phuoc Hoang Ho for guidance with GPC and TPD measurements, respectively and also to Per-Erik Lauronen and Marcus Engström for their experimental work.

Available from: 2022-09-29 Created: 2022-09-29 Last updated: 2023-07-03
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8264-4736

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