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Publications (10 of 30) Show all publications
Janhäll, S., Strandberg, B., Wallqvist, V. & Rissler, J. (2024). A new method and first results for comparing emissions of fumes during construction of asphalt surfaces. Construction and Building Materials, 422, Article ID 135736.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A new method and first results for comparing emissions of fumes during construction of asphalt surfaces
2024 (English)In: Construction and Building Materials, ISSN 0950-0618, E-ISSN 1879-0526, Vol. 422, article id 135736Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A novel laboratory methodology for analysing hot asphalt fumes from various paving materials is presented and evaluated. This method facilitates comparative assessments, aiming to enhance occupational safety for asphalt workers and ensure safe implementation of new paving materials. Comparative analyses of emissions to air were conducted on standard asphalt and rubber-modified asphalt at different temperatures. The temperature significantly influences PAH emissions. Rubber-modified asphalt demonstrated higher PAH emissions at equivalent temperatures compared to standard asphalt, predominantly naphthalene. Even heavier PAHs as benzo(a)pyrene were occasionally high. Notably, at recommended working temperatures the standard asphalt resulted in higher emissions, comprising heavier PAHs compared to rubber asphalt. © 2024 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2024
Keywords
Naphthalene; Occupational risks; Pavements; Rubber; Styrene; Asphalt fumes; Asphalt surfaces; Comparative assessment; Heavy PAH; Occupational safety; PAH emissions; Particle; Rubber modified asphalt; Workers’; Working environment; Asphalt
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-72785 (URN)10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2024.135736 (DOI)2-s2.0-85187805767 (Scopus ID)
Note

This work was supported by VINNOVA and performed in cooperation with PEAB Asphalt AB and Rang-Sells. The authors would like to thank Lars Jansson and Lennart Holmqvist from PEAB Asphalt AB for their interest, knowledge and support in the lab.

Available from: 2024-05-14 Created: 2024-05-14 Last updated: 2024-05-14Bibliographically approved
Abrahamsson, C., Rissler, J., Kåredal, M., Hedmer, M., Suchorzewski, J., Prieto Rábade, M., . . . Isaxon, C. (2024). Characterization of airborne dust emissions from three types of crushed multi-walled carbon nanotube-enhanced concretes. NanoImpact, 34, Article ID 100500.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization of airborne dust emissions from three types of crushed multi-walled carbon nanotube-enhanced concretes
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2024 (English)In: NanoImpact, ISSN 2452-0748, Vol. 34, article id 100500Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dispersing Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) into concrete at low (<1 wt% in cement) concentrations may improve concrete performance and properties and provide enhanced functionalities. When MWCNT-enhanced concrete is fragmented during remodelling or demolition, the stiff, fibrous and carcinogenic MWCNTs will, however, also be part of the respirable particulate matter released in the process. Consequently, systematic aerosolizing of crushed MWCNT-enhanced concretes in a controlled environment and measuring the properties of this aerosol can give valuable insights into the characteristics of the emissions such as concentrations, size range and morphology. These properties impact to which extent the emissions can be inhaled as well as where they are expected to deposit in the lung, which is critical to assess whether these materials might constitute a future health risk for construction and demolition workers. In this work, the impact from MWCNTs on aerosol characteristics was assessed for samples of three concrete types with various amounts of MWCNT, using a novel methodology based on the continuous drop method. MWCNT-enhanced concretes were crushed, aerosolized and the emitted particles were characterized with online and offline techniques. For light-weight porous concrete, the addition of MWCNT significantly reduced the respirable mass fraction (RESP) and particle number concentrations (PNC) across all size ranges (7 nm – 20 μm), indicating that MWCNTs dampened the fragmentation process by possibly reinforcing the microstructure of brittle concrete. For normal concrete, the opposite could be seen, where MWCNTs resulted in drastic increases in RESP and PNC, suggesting that the MWCNTs may be acting as defects in the concrete matrix, thus enhancing the fragmentation process. For the high strength concrete, the fragmentation decreased at the lowest MWCNT concentration, but increased again for the highest MWCNT concentration. All tested concrete types emitted <100 nm particles, regardless of CNT content. SEM imaging displayed CNTs protruding from concrete fragments, but no free fibres were detected. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2024
Keywords
Aerosols; Concrete aggregates; Demolition; Health risks; Light weight concrete; Morphology; Risk assessment; Buildings materials; Cellular lightweight concrete; Cellulars; Concrete types; Construction and demolition waste; Multi-walled-carbon-nanotubes; Nano-enabled building material; Nanosafety; Property; Size ranges; Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCN)
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-72968 (URN)10.1016/j.impact.2024.100500 (DOI)2-s2.0-85186528171 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 814632AFA Insurance, 20010
Note

This study was supported by AFA Insurance ( dnr 20010 ); the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme LightCoce (grant agreement No 814632 ); and the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research through the research program Mistra Environmental Nanosafety Phase II.

Available from: 2024-04-25 Created: 2024-04-25 Last updated: 2024-04-25Bibliographically approved
Ziegler, A.-K., Jensen, J. K., Jiménez-Gallardo, L., Rissler, J., Gudmundsson, A., Nilsson, J.-Å. & Isaksson, C. (2024). Dietary fatty acids modulate oxidative stress response to air pollution but not to infection. Frontiers in Physiology, 15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dietary fatty acids modulate oxidative stress response to air pollution but not to infection
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2024 (English)In: Frontiers in Physiology, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Anthropogenic changes to the environment expose wildlife to many pollutants. Among these, tropospheric ozone is of global concern and a highly potent pro-oxidant. In addition, human activities include several other implications for wildlife, e.g., changed food availability and changed distribution of pathogens in cities. These co-occurring habitat changes may interact, thereby modulating the physiological responses and costs related to anthropogenic change. For instance, many food items associated with humans (e.g., food waste and feeders for wild birds) contain relatively more ω6-than ω3-polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Metabolites derived from ω6-PUFAs can enhance inflammation and oxidative stress towards a stimulus, whereas the opposite response is linked to ω3-derived metabolites. Hence, we hypothesized that differential intake of ω6-and ω3-PUFAs modulates the oxidative stress state of birds and thereby affects the responses towards pro-oxidants. To test this, we manipulated dietary ω6:ω3 ratios and ozone levels in a full-factorial experiment using captive zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). Additionally, we simulated an infection, thereby also triggering the immune system’s adaptive pro-oxidant release (i.e., oxidative burst), by injecting lipopolysaccharide. Under normal air conditions, the ω3-diet birds had a lower antioxidant ratio (GSH/GSSG ratio) compared to the ω6-diet birds. When exposed to ozone, however, the diet effect disappeared. Instead, ozone exposure overall reduced the total concentration of the key antioxidant glutathione (tGSH). Moreover, the birds on the ω6-rich diet had an overall higher antioxidant capacity (OXY) compared to birds fed a ω3-rich diet. Interestingly, only the immune challenge increased oxidative damage, suggesting the oxidative burst of the immune system overrides the other pro-oxidative processes, including diet. Taken together, our results show that ozone, dietary PUFAs, and infection all affect the redox-system, but in different ways, suggesting that the underlying responses are decoupled despite that they all increase pro-oxidant exposure or generation. Despite lack of apparent cumulative effect in the independent biomarkers, the combined single effects could together reduce overall cellular functioning and efficiency over time in wild birds exposed to pathogens, ozone, and anthropogenic food sources. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media SA, 2024
Keywords
antioxidant; coconut oil; docosahexaenoic acid; fatty acid; glutathione; glutathione peroxidase; glutathione reductase; linoleic acid; malonaldehyde; oleic acid; palmitic acid; potato starch; animal experiment; Article; female; male; nonhuman
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-73577 (URN)10.3389/fphys.2024.1391806 (DOI)2-s2.0-85193785358 (Scopus ID)
Note

 This research has been funded by FORMAS to CI (2015-00526 and 2016-00329).

Available from: 2024-06-18 Created: 2024-06-18 Last updated: 2024-06-18Bibliographically approved
Linell, J., Isaxon, C., Olsson, B., Stroh, E., Wollmer, P., Löndahl, J. & Rissler, J. (2024). Effects of breathing variables on modelled particle lung deposition at physical activity for children and adults. Air quality, atmosphere and health, 17(4), 843-856
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of breathing variables on modelled particle lung deposition at physical activity for children and adults
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2024 (English)In: Air quality, atmosphere and health, ISSN 1873-9318, E-ISSN 1873-9326, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 843-856Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The respiratory tract deposited fraction (DF) is the link between exposure and health effects of airborne particles. Here, we investigate how breathing pattern alterations at increasing physical activity affect DF in different regions of the respiratory tract and compare DF between adults and children (5 and 10 years old). We performed a literature review on the alteration of tidal volume with minute ventilation at increasing physical activity and used the results to model the size resolved (0.001–10 µm) DF, primarily using the deposition models from NCRP and Yeh and Schum (1980), but also MPPD. We found a shift in the deposited size distribution with increasing physical activity—DF of ultrafine particles increased in the alveolar region and decreased in the other regions, while DF of coarser particles decreased in the alveolar region and increased in the extra-thoracic region. Children had a 10–20% higher DF of ultrafine particles in the alveolar region compared to adults. We also present parametrizations of the daily average size resolved (0.005–5 µm) DF, accounting for varying physical activity throughout the day and oral/nasal breathing. These can be applied to any size distribution to estimate deposited doses. We found that deposited mass and number doses were more than twice as high for 5-year-olds compared to adults when normalized for body weight, primarily caused by their higher weight normalized minute ventilation. This demonstrates the importance of studying children’s exposure to air pollution and not only rely on data from adults. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Science and Business Media B.V., 2024
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-69252 (URN)10.1007/s11869-023-01484-0 (DOI)2-s2.0-85181214903 (Scopus ID)
Note

Open access funding provided by Lund University. This research was supported by Formas (prn 2018–00693), with contributions from the Swedish Research Council (2021–03265) and the Swedish Heart Lung Foundation (2020–0855).

Available from: 2024-01-12 Created: 2024-01-12 Last updated: 2024-06-11Bibliographically approved
Bergman, F., Eriksson, A. C., Spanne, M., Ohlsson, L., Mahmutovic Persson, I., Uller, L., . . . Isaxon, C. (2024). Physicochemical metamorphosis of re-aerosolized urban PM2.5. Journal of Aerosol Science, 181, Article ID 106416.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physicochemical metamorphosis of re-aerosolized urban PM2.5
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Aerosol Science, ISSN 0021-8502, E-ISSN 1879-1964, Vol. 181, article id 106416Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The toxicity of particulate matter (PM) is dependent on particle physical and chemical properties and is commonly studied using in vivo and in vitro approaches. PM to be used for in vivo and in vitro studies is often collected on filters and then extracted from the filter surface using a solvent. During extraction and further PM sample handling, particle properties change, but this is often neglected in toxicology studies, with possible implications for health effect assessment. To address the current lack of knowledge and investigate changes in particle properties further, ambient PM with diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) was collected on filters at an urban site and extracted using a standard methanol protocol. After extraction, the PM was dried, dispersed in water and subsequently nebulized. The resulting aerosol properties were then compared to those of the ambient PM2.5. The number size distribution for the nebulized aerosol resembled the ambient in terms of the main mode diameter, and >90 % of particle mass in the nebulized size distribution was still in the PM2.5 range. Black carbon made up a similar fraction of PM mass in nebulized as in ambient aerosol. The sulfate content in the nebulized aerosol seemed depleted and the chemical composition of the organic fraction was altered, but it remains unclear to what extent other non-refractory components were affected by the extraction process. Trace elements were not distributed equally across size fractions, neither in ambient nor nebulized PM. Change in chemical form was studied for zinc, copper and iron. The form did not appear to be different between the ambient and nebulized PM for iron and copper, but seemed altered for zinc. Although many of the studied properties were reasonably well preserved, it is clear that the PM2.5 collection and re-aerosolization process affects particles, and thus potentially also their health effects. Because of this, the effect of the particle collection and extraction process must be considered when evaluating cellular and physiological outcomes upon PM2.5 exposure. © 2024 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2024
Keywords
Aerosols; Air pollution; Chemical speciation; Copper; Extraction; Iron; Size distribution; Sulfur compounds; Trace elements; Urban growth; Ambient particulate Matter; Ambients; Health effects; In-vitro; In-vivo; Inhalation toxicology; Methanol extraction; Particle properties; Particulate Matter; XANES; Zinc
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-73776 (URN)10.1016/j.jaerosci.2024.106416 (DOI)2-s2.0-85196408742 (Scopus ID)
Note

This work was supported by Formas (2019-00320), The Crafoord Foundation (20200673) and AFA (160226)

Available from: 2024-06-25 Created: 2024-06-25 Last updated: 2024-06-25Bibliographically approved
Abrahamsson, C., Rissler, J., Hedmer, M., KÃ¥redal, M. & Isaxon, C. (2023). 77 Aerosolized Particulate Matter from Fragmentation of Carbon Nanotube-Enhanced Concrete. Paper presented at ABSTRACTS FROM THE 2022 AIRMON-10 CONFERENCE. Annals of Work Exposures and Health, 67(Supplement_1), i94-i95
Open this publication in new window or tab >>77 Aerosolized Particulate Matter from Fragmentation of Carbon Nanotube-Enhanced Concrete
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2023 (English)In: Annals of Work Exposures and Health, Vol. 67, no Supplement_1, p. i94-i95Article in journal (Other academic) Published
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-71332 (URN)10.1093/annweh/wxac087.231 (DOI)
Conference
ABSTRACTS FROM THE 2022 AIRMON-10 CONFERENCE
Available from: 2024-01-24 Created: 2024-01-24 Last updated: 2024-01-24Bibliographically approved
Rissler, J., Sjögren, M. P., Linell, J., Hurtig, A. L., Wollmer, P. & Löndahl, J. (2023). An experimental study on lung deposition of inhaled 2 Όm particles in relation to lung characteristics and deposition models. Particle and Fibre Toxicology, 20(1), Article ID 40.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An experimental study on lung deposition of inhaled 2 Όm particles in relation to lung characteristics and deposition models
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2023 (English)In: Particle and Fibre Toxicology, E-ISSN 1743-8977, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The understanding of inhaled particle respiratory tract deposition is a key link to understand the health effects of particles or the efficiency for medical drug delivery via the lung. However, there are few experimental data on particle respiratory tract deposition, and the existing data deviates considerably when comparing results for particles > 1 μm. Methods: We designed an experimental set-up to measure deposition in the respiratory tract for particles > 1 μm, more specifically 2.3 μm, with careful consideration to minimise foreseen errors. We measured the deposition in seventeen healthy adults (21–68 years). The measurements were performed at tidal breathing, during three consecutive 5-minute periods while logging breathing patterns. Pulmonary function tests were performed, including the new airspace dimension assessment (AiDA) method measuring distal lung airspace radius (r AiDA). The lung characteristics and breathing variables were used in statistical models to investigate to what extent they can explain individual variations in measured deposited particle fraction. The measured particle deposition was compared to values predicted with whole lung models. Model calculations were made for each subject using measured variables as input (e.g., breathing pattern and functional residual capacity). Results: The measured fractional deposition for 2.3 μm particles was 0.60 ± 0.14, which is significantly higher than predicted by any of the models tested, ranging from 0.37 ± 0.08 to 0.53 ± 0.09. The multiple-path particle dosimetry (MPPD) model most closely predicted the measured deposition when using the new PNNL lung model. The individual variability in measured particle deposition was best explained by breathing pattern and distal airspace radius (r AiDA) at half inflation from AiDA. All models underestimated inter-subject variability even though the individual breathing pattern and functional residual capacity for each participant was used in the model. Conclusions: Whole lung models need to be tuned and improved to predict the respiratory tract particle deposition of micron-sized particles, and to capture individual variations – a variation that is known to be higher for aged and diseased lungs. Further, the results support the hypothesis that the AiDA method measures dimensions in the peripheral lung and that r AiDA, as measured by the AiDA, can be used to better understand the individual variation in the dose to healthy and diseased lungs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central Ltd, 2023
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-67672 (URN)10.1186/s12989-023-00551-9 (DOI)2-s2.0-85174821180 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2021–03265Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20200855Swedish Research Council Formas, 2018 − 00693
Note

The authors would like to acknowledge Haris Zilic, Shakilla Modaber, and Eva Assarsson for performing the clinical lung function tests and AiDA. We also want to acknowledge Bo Olsson (Emmace Consulting) for help with lung deposition modelling and for access to the Mimetikos Preludium software. This research was supported by the Swedish Research Council for Environmental, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, FORMAS (grant number 2018 − 00693), the Swedish Research Council, VR (2021–03265) and the Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation (20200855).

Available from: 2023-11-22 Created: 2023-11-22 Last updated: 2023-11-22Bibliographically approved
Odnevall, I., Brookman-Amissah, M., Stábile, F., Ekvall, M. T., Herting, G., Bermeo Vargas, M., . . . Rissler, J. (2023). Characterization and Toxic Potency of Airborne Particles Formed upon Waste from Electrical and Electronic Equipment Waste Recycling: A Case Study. ACS Environmental Au, 3(6), 370-382
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization and Toxic Potency of Airborne Particles Formed upon Waste from Electrical and Electronic Equipment Waste Recycling: A Case Study
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2023 (English)In: ACS Environmental Au, ISSN 2694-2518, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 370-382Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Manual dismantling, shredding, and mechanical grinding of waste from electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) at recycling facilities inevitably lead to the accidental formation and release of both coarse and fine particle aerosols, primarily into the ambient air. Since diffuse emissions to air of such WEEE particles are not regulated, their dispersion from the recycling plants into the adjacent environment is possible. The aim of this interdisciplinary project was to collect and characterize airborne WEEE particles smaller than 1 μm generated at a Nordic open waste recycling facility from a particle concentration, shape, and bulk and surface composition perspective. Since dispersed airborne particles eventually may reach rivers, lakes, and possibly oceans, the aim was also to assess whether such particles may pose any adverse effects on aquatic organisms. The results show that WEEE particles only exerted a weak tendency toward cytotoxic effects on fish gill cell lines, although the exposure resulted in ROS formation that may induce adverse effects. On the contrary, the WEEE particles were toxic toward the crustacean zooplankter Daphnia magna, showing strong effects on survival of the animals in a concentration-dependent way. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society, 2023
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-68788 (URN)10.1021/acsenvironau.3c00034 (DOI)2-s2.0-85178365949 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental ResearchSwedish Research Council, 2018-07152Vinnova, 2018-04969Swedish Research Council Formas, 2019-02496
Note

Financial support from the Mistra Environmental Nanosafety Phase II research program funded by the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research (Mistra) is highly acknowledged. We acknowledge MAX IV Laboratory for time on Balder beamline under proposal 20220629. Research conducted at MAX IV, a Swedish national user facility, is supported by the Swedish Research council under contract 2018-07152, the Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems under contract 2018-04969, and Formas under contract 2019-02496. We acknowledge Monica Kåredahl for ICP-MS measurement and Mikael Elfman for PIXE analysis.

Available from: 2024-01-15 Created: 2024-01-15 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Vasilatou, K., Wälchli, C., Iida, K., Horender, S., Tritscher, T., Hammer, T., . . . Auderset, K. (2023). Extending traceability in airborne particle size distribution measurements beyond 10 µm: Counting efficiency and unit-to-unit variability of four aerodynamic particle size spectrometers. Aerosol Science and Technology, 57(1), 24-34
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Extending traceability in airborne particle size distribution measurements beyond 10 µm: Counting efficiency and unit-to-unit variability of four aerodynamic particle size spectrometers
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2023 (English)In: Aerosol Science and Technology, ISSN 0278-6826, E-ISSN 1521-7388, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 24-34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to establish traceable number concentration measurements of airborne particles beyond 10 μm in particle size. To this end, the primary standards for particle number concentration at the National Metrology Institutes of Switzerland and Japan were further developed to extend their measurement capabilities. Details on the upgraded setup are provided. An inter-comparison of the two primary standards using an optical particle counter as transfer standard showed that these agree well within the stated uncertainties at polystyrene (PS) equivalent optical diameter of 15 µm. Subsequently, four Model 3321 (TSI Inc., USA) aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS) were calibrated against the primary standard of Switzerland using size-certified PS spheres with optical/aerodynamic diameter up to 20 µm as test aerosols. The counting efficiency profile and unit-to-unit variability of the APS units were determined. The results presented here can be useful for the analysis and interpretation of data collected by the different atmospheric aerosol networks worldwide. The outlined methodology can also be applied in the calibration of automated bio-aerosol monitors. © 2022 The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor and Francis Ltd., 2023
Keywords
Jason Olfert, Aerodynamics, Atmospheric aerosols, Efficiency, Particle size analysis, Spectrometers, Aerodynamic particles, Airborne particle, Counting efficiency, Number concentration, Optical-, Particle size distribution measurement, Particles sizes, Primary standards, Switzerland, Particle size
National Category
Subatomic Physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-61419 (URN)10.1080/02786826.2022.2139659 (DOI)2-s2.0-85142268996 (Scopus ID)
Note

METAS, Lund University, RISE and LNE acknowledge funding from the EMPIR Aeromet II project. The EMPIR programme is co-financed by the Participating States and from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and Innovation Programme. METAS was also supported by internal funds.

Available from: 2022-12-08 Created: 2022-12-08 Last updated: 2023-07-06Bibliographically approved
Rissler, J., Preger, C., Eriksson, A., Lin, J., Prisle, N. & Svenningsson, B. (2023). Missed Evaporation from Atmospherically Relevant Inorganic Mixtures Confounds Experimental Aerosol Studies. Environmental Science and Technology, 57(7), 2706-2714
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Missed Evaporation from Atmospherically Relevant Inorganic Mixtures Confounds Experimental Aerosol Studies
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2023 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 57, no 7, p. 2706-2714Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sea salt aerosol particles are highly abundant in the atmosphere and play important roles in the global radiative balance. After influence from continental air, they are typically composed of Na+, Cl-, NH4+, and SO42- and organics. Analogous particle systems are often studied in laboratory settings by atomizing and drying particles from a solution. Here, we present evidence that such laboratory studies may be consistently biased in that they neglect losses of solutes to the gas phase. We present experimental evidence from a hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer and an aerosol mass spectrometer, further supported by thermodynamic modeling. We show that, at normally prevailing laboratory aerosol mass concentrations, for mixtures of NaCl and (NH4)2SO4, a significant portion of the Cl- and NH4+ ions are lost to the gas phase, in some cases, leaving mainly Na2SO4 in the dry particles. Not considering losses of solutes to the gas phase during experimental studies will likely result in misinterpretation of the data. One example of such data is that from particle water uptake experiments. This may bias the explanatory models constructed from the data and introduce errors inte predictions made by air quality or climate models. © 2023 The Authors. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society, 2023
Keywords
hygroscopicity, thermodynamics, inorganic aerosol mixtures, sea salt, sea spray, Aerosols, Air quality, Climate models, Gases, Nitrogen compounds, Sodium chloride, Sodium sulfate, Thermodynamics, Aerosol particles, Gas-phases, Hygroscopicity, thermodynamic, Inorganic aerosol, Inorganic aerosol mixture, Inorganic mixtures, Radiative balance, Sea salt aerosol, Sea salts, Sulfur compounds
National Category
Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-64106 (URN)10.1021/acs.est.2c06545 (DOI)2-s2.0-85148002467 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: AEROMET II 19ENV06; Funding details: Horizon 2020 Framework Programme, H2020, 717022; Funding details: European Research Council, ERC; Funding details: Svenska Forskningsrådet Formas; Funding details: Academy of Finland, AKA, 257411, 308238, 314175, 331532, 335649; Funding text 1: B.S. acknowledges SRA MERGE for creating a stimulating scientific community. B.S. and J.R. acknowledge FORMAS for financial support. C.P. acknowledges the Lund Institute of Technology for PostDoc funding. J.R. and A.C.E. further acknowledge financial support by the grant AEROMET II 19ENV06. N.L.P. and J.J.L. acknowledge funding from the Academy of Finland (Grant Nos. 257411, 308238, 314175, 331532, and 335649) and the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme (Project SURFACE, Grant Agreement No. 717022).

Available from: 2023-02-28 Created: 2023-02-28 Last updated: 2023-07-06Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8650-4741

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