Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 39) Show all publications
Zhou, L., Chen, Z., Lundqvist, S. O., Olsson, L., Grahn, T., Karlsson, B., . . . García-Gil, M. (2019). Genetic analysis of wood quality traits in norway spruce open-pollinated progenies and their parent plus trees at clonal archives and the evaluation of phenotypic selection of plus trees. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 49(7), 810-818
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic analysis of wood quality traits in norway spruce open-pollinated progenies and their parent plus trees at clonal archives and the evaluation of phenotypic selection of plus trees
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0045-5067, E-ISSN 1208-6037, Vol. 49, no 7, p. 810-818Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A two-generation pedigree involving 519 Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) plus trees (at clonal archives) and their open-pollinated (OP) progenies was studied with the aim to evaluate the potential of plus-tree selection based on phenotype data scored on the plus trees. Two wood properties (wood density and modulus of elasticity, MOE) and one fiber property (microfibril angle, MFA) were measured with a SilviScan instrument on samples from one ramet per plus tree and 12 OP progenies per plus tree (total of 6288 trees). Three ramets per plus tree and their OP progenies were also assessed for Pilodyn penetration depth and Hitman acoustic velocity, which were used to estimate MOE. The narrow-sense heritability (h2) estimates based on parent– offspring regression were marginally higher than those based on half-sib correlation when three ramets per plus tree were included. For SilviScan data, estimates of the correlation between half-sib, progeny-based breeding values (BVs) and plus-tree phenotypes, as well as repeatability estimates, were highest for wood density, followed by MOE and MFA. Considering that the repeatability estimates from the clonal archive trees were higher than any h2 estimate, selection of the best clones from clonal archives would be an effective alternative.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Canadian Science Publishing, 2019
Keywords
Heritability, Norway spruce, Offspring regression, Parent, Repeatability, Solid wood, Acoustic wave velocity, Acoustic wave velocity measurement, Hardwoods, Plants (botany), Quality control, Solid woods, Forestry, Picea abies
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-39281 (URN)10.1139/cjfr-2018-0117 (DOI)2-s2.0-85067585682 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: VINNOVA; Funding details: Stiftelsen för Strategisk Forskning, RBP14-0040; Funding details: Knut och Alice Wallenbergs Stiftelse; Funding text 1: We acknowledge Skogforsk for support with the collection of data in both the clonal archive and progeny trials and Åke Hans-son, Thomas Trost, and Fredrik Adås of Innventia (now RISE Bioeconomy) for the excellent work with the SilviScan wood analyses. We also acknowledge Bio4Energy and the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (SSF, grant No. RBP14-0040), funding from Vinnova (the Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems), and KAW (the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation) for support to conduct this study.

Available from: 2019-07-03 Created: 2019-07-03 Last updated: 2019-08-01Bibliographically approved
Baison, J., Vidalis, A., Zhou, L., Chen, Z.-Q., Li, Z., Sillanpää, M. J., . . . García-Gil, M. R. (2019). Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) identified novel candidate loci affecting wood formation in Norway spruce. The Plant Journal
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) identified novel candidate loci affecting wood formation in Norway spruce
Show others...
2019 (English)In: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Norway spruce is a boreal forest tree species of significant ecological and economic importance. Hence there is a strong imperative to dissect the genetics underlying important wood quality traits in the species. We performed a functional Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) of 17 wood traits in Norway spruce using 178101 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) generated from exome genotyping of 517 mother trees. The wood traits were defined using functional modelling of wood properties across annual growth rings.We applied a LASSO based association mapping method using a functional multi-locus mapping approach that utilizes latent traits, with a stability selection probability method as the hypothesis testing approach to determine significant Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs). The analysis provided 52 significant SNPs from 39 candidate genes, including genes previously implicated in wood formation and tree growth in spruce and other species. Our study represents a multi-locus GWAS for complex wood traits in Norway spruce. The results advance our understanding of the genetics influencing wood traits and identifies candidate genes for future functional studies.

Keywords
Candidate genes, Functional trait mapping, Genome-wide association mapping, Norway spruce, Sequence capture, Single nucleotide polymorphisms
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-39067 (URN)10.1111/tpj.14429 (DOI)31166032 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-06-26 Created: 2019-06-26 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Mjörnell, K. & Olsson, L. (2019). Moisture Safety of Wooden Buildings – Design, Construction and Operation. Journal of sustainable architecture and civil engineering, 24(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Moisture Safety of Wooden Buildings – Design, Construction and Operation
2019 (English)In: Journal of sustainable architecture and civil engineering, ISSN 2029–9990, Vol. 24, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During the last decade, building in wood has increased, mainly due to environmental awareness andtargets to decrease the carbon footprint originated from the production of building materials. Newtechnologies such as CLT (cross laminated timber) have accelerated the construction of multi-storywooden buildings. The CLT structure has been used both for housing and offices. Due to the extensivesize of the buildings and relatively fast assembly of the buildings, weather protection has not alwaysbeen used. It is commonly known that building materials sensitive to moisture need to be protectedagainst high moisture conditions and water during construction. If this is not done, there is an increasedrisk of microbial growth which can result in health problems for future users of the building, extensivecosts for the remediation and exchange of materials, but also lack of trust in the construction industry.There are disagreements between the building industry and researchers how sensitive wooden buildingsare to exposure to high moisture levels and water during storage at sites and construction. Based onresults from several research projects studying moisture conditions both in the laboratory and in thefield, recommendations for procurement, storage and handling of wood during construction to assuremoisture safety are suggested in this pa

Keywords
CLT, guidance, massive wooden buildings, moisture safety, mould growth.
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-38585 (URN)
Available from: 2019-05-08 Created: 2019-05-08 Last updated: 2019-05-08Bibliographically approved
Mjörnell, K. & Olsson, L. (2019). Moisture safety of wooden buildings – design, construction and operation. Journal of Sustainable Architecture and Civil Engineering, 24(1), 29-35
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Moisture safety of wooden buildings – design, construction and operation
2019 (English)In: Journal of Sustainable Architecture and Civil Engineering, ISSN 2029-9990, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 29-35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During the last decade, building in wood has increased, mainly due to environmental awareness and targets to decrease the carbon footprint originated from the production of building materials. New technologies such as CLT (cross laminated timber) have accelerated the construction of multi-story wooden buildings. The CLT structure has been used both for housing and offices. Due to the extensive size of the buildings and relatively fast assembly of the buildings, weather protection has not always been used. It is commonly known that building materials sensitive to moisture need to be protected against high moisture conditions and water during construction. If this is not done, there is an increased risk of microbial growth which can result in health problems for future users of the building, extensive costs for the remediation and exchange of materials, but also lack of trust in the construction industry. There are disagreements between the building industry and researchers how sensitive wooden buildings are to exposure to high moisture levels and water during storage at sites and construction. Based on results from several research projects studying moisture conditions both in the laboratory and in the field, recommendations for procurement, storage and handling of wood during construction to assure moisture safety are suggested in this paper.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kauno Technologijos Universitetas, 2019
Keywords
CLT, Guidance, Massive wooden buildings, Moisture safety, Mould growth
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-39928 (URN)10.5755/j01.sace.24.1.22341 (DOI)2-s2.0-85071775890 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-09-19 Created: 2019-09-19 Last updated: 2019-09-19Bibliographically approved
Olsson, L. (2018). Rain resistance of façades with façade details: A summary of three field and laboratory studies. Journal of Building Physics, 41(6), 521-532
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rain resistance of façades with façade details: A summary of three field and laboratory studies
2018 (English)In: Journal of Building Physics, ISSN 1744-2591, E-ISSN 1744-2583, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 521-532Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ne of the main functions of the exterior walls and façades is to protect the indoor and the sensitive parts of construction from the outdoor climate. Exposure of driving rain is the most prominent moisture source a wall has to resist. Despite this, there is a lack of information on rain resistance. Field measurements on real-life external walls show that recurrent water leakage under driving rain conditions is observed in five out of seven new-built houses in Sweden, including those with ventilated façades. About a 100 commercial laboratory façade tests, mounted by façade suppliers, and targeted laboratory experiments showed that it is almost impossible to achieve fully tight façade solutions, and keep them sealed. Nearly, all test walls with façade details leaked, almost regardless of façade type and sealing efforts. The results from field and laboratory measurements of rain resistance in new buildings in Sweden show that façades are usually not water-tight and also that very small deficiencies can cause substantial amount of water leakage. © 2017, © The Author(s) 2017.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE Publications Ltd, 2018
Keywords
Driving rain, EN 12865, measurements, moisture, rain intrusion, risk assessment, wall, water leakage, window, Laboratories, Leakage (fluid), Measurement, Walls (structural partitions), Windows, Field measurement, Laboratory experiments, Laboratory measurements, Laboratory studies, Rain
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-33899 (URN)10.1177/1744259117713265 (DOI)2-s2.0-85046830183 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Energimyndigheten

Available from: 2018-05-30 Created: 2018-05-30 Last updated: 2018-08-23Bibliographically approved
Olsson, L. (2017). Rain intrusion rates at façade details - A summary of results from four laboratory studies. In: Energy Procedia: . Paper presented at 11th Nordic Symposium on Building Physics, NSB 2017, 11 June 2017 through 14 June 2017 (pp. 387-392).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rain intrusion rates at façade details - A summary of results from four laboratory studies
2017 (English)In: Energy Procedia, 2017, p. 387-392Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

More knowledge and realistic data on inward leakage is needed not only to better understand and confirm rain resistance of different facades, but also to carry out reliable theoretical moisture risk assessments of façade details in external walls. This article is an attempt to highlight amounts of expected leakage based on four laboratory studies. The results show that under heavy driving rain conditions, there may be continuous point leakage of significant volumes of water (0,01-0,05 l/min) in small invisible deficiencies, and corresponds to up to 2% of the applied water load. The leakage rate also depends, more or less, on the size, position and geometry of the deficiency, cumulative runoff rates, size of projecting details and surface properties. © 2017 The Authors.

Keywords
building envelope, Driving rain, EN 12865, rain intrusion, risk assessment, wall, water lekage, window, Mercury (metal), Walls (structural partitions), Windows, Building envelopes, Cumulative runoffs, External walls, Laboratory studies, Leakage rates, Rain
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-33137 (URN)10.1016/j.egypro.2017.09.639 (DOI)2-s2.0-85033364738 (Scopus ID)
Conference
11th Nordic Symposium on Building Physics, NSB 2017, 11 June 2017 through 14 June 2017
Available from: 2018-01-31 Created: 2018-01-31 Last updated: 2018-08-23Bibliographically approved
Olsson, L. & Mjörnell, K. (2017). Väderskyddat byggande: - eller omfattande fukt- och mögelkontroll av fuktexponerat virke, konstruktioner och KL-trä?. Bygg & Teknik (5)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Väderskyddat byggande: - eller omfattande fukt- och mögelkontroll av fuktexponerat virke, konstruktioner och KL-trä?
2017 (Swedish)In: Bygg & Teknik, no 5, p. 4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [sv]

När det gäller byggnadskonstruktioner så behöver allt fuktkänsligt byggmaterial skyddas mot förhöjd fuktighet och vatten. Görs inte detta så är risken stor bland annat för mikrobiell påväxt och byggnadsdelar behöver undersökas med avseende på fukt och mikrobiell påväxt.Anledningen till att det behöver undersökas med avseende på mikrobiell påväxt handlar inte bara om risken för hälsobesvär hos framtida brukare av byggnaden eller sanerings- och undersökningskostnader och utbyte av material och konstruktioner som följd av uppfuktning, utan även etik- och miljökonsekvensfrågor som blivit alltmer betydelsefullt i byggprojekt

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: , 2017. p. 4
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-32881 (URN)
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2018-08-23Bibliographically approved
Chen, Z.-Q., Karlsson, B., Mörling, T., Olsson, L., Mellerowicz, E. J., Wu, H. X., . . . Gil, M. R. (2016). Genetic analysis of fiber dimensions and their correlation with stem diameter and solid-wood properties in Norway spruce. Tree Genetics & Genomes, 12(6), Article ID 123.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic analysis of fiber dimensions and their correlation with stem diameter and solid-wood properties in Norway spruce
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Tree Genetics & Genomes, ISSN 1614-2942, E-ISSN 1614-2950, Vol. 12, no 6, article id 123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Adverse genetic correlations between growth traits and solid-wood, as well as fiber traits are a concern in conifer breeding programs. To evaluate the impact of selection for growth and solid-wood properties on fiber dimensions, we investigated the inheritance and efficiency of early selection for different wood-fiber traits and their correlations with stem diameter, wood density, modulus of elasticity (MOE), and microfibril angle (MFA) in Norway spruce (Picea abies L). The study was based on two large open-pollinated progeny trials established in southern Sweden in 1990 with material from 524 families comprising 5618 trees. Two increment cores were sampled from each tree. Radial variations from pith to bark were determined for rings 3–15 with SilviScan for fiber widths in the radial (RFW) and tangential (TFW) direction, fiber wall thickness (FWT), and fiber coarseness (FC). Fiber length (FL) was determined for rings 8–11. Heritabilities based on rings 8–11 using joint-site data were moderate to high (0.24–0.51) for all fiber-dimension traits. Heritabilities based on stem cross-sectional averages varied from 0.34 to 0.48 and reached a plateau at rings 6–9. The “age-age” genetic correlations for RFW, TFW, FWT, and FC cross-sectional averages at a particular age with cross-sectional averages at ring 15 reached 0.9 at rings 4–7. Our results indicated a moderate to high positive genetic correlation for density and MOE with FC and FWT, moderate and negative with RFW, and low with TFW and FL. Comparison of several selection scenarios indicated that the highest profitability is reached when diameter and MOE are considered jointly, in which case, the effect on any fiber dimension is negligible. Early selection was highly efficient from ring 5 for RFW and from rings 8–10 for TFW, FWT, and FC.

Keywords
Age-age correlations, Early selection, Fiber dimensions, Genetic correlations, Heritability, Norway spruce, Picea abies
National Category
Wood Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-27568 (URN)10.1007/s11295-016-1065-0 (DOI)2-s2.0-84996957482 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-15 Created: 2016-12-15 Last updated: 2019-06-14Bibliographically approved
Olsson, L. (2016). Laboratory study of driving rain resistance of four façade systems with window fittings - Experimental results of leakage flows. In: CESB 2016 - Central Europe Towards Sustainable Building 2016: Innovations for Sustainable Future. Paper presented at Central Europe Towards Sustainable Building 2016: Innovations for Sustainable Future (CESB 2016), June 22-24, 2016, Prague, Czech Republic (pp. 1233-1240).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Laboratory study of driving rain resistance of four façade systems with window fittings - Experimental results of leakage flows
2016 (English)In: CESB 2016 - Central Europe Towards Sustainable Building 2016: Innovations for Sustainable Future, 2016, p. 1233-1240Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Facades generally experience leaks and driving rain is considered to be a significant source of moisture, which should be taken into account when carrying out moisture calculations for exterior walls. Water can leak into the exterior walls and facades to a greater or lesser extent. However, we lack specific information with details on the amount of penetrating water. Four facade systems have been examined. Three of the facade systems were different in that there was one ventilated system, one single-stage sealing system and two drained systems. To better understand the exact importance of seals and variations in installation and workmanship, these factors have also been studied. The measurements show significant water leakage where seals are absent. Even in cases with seals present, there are leakages. Although the installations were performed by professionals, it was still leaky which shows that facade systems with window fittings should be designed and tested for any anticipated defects in order to ensure that the exterior wall are not subject to moisture damage.

Keywords
Driving rain resistance, EN 12865, Fagade, Water leakage, Windows, Intelligent buildings, Moisture, Rain, Sustainable development, Walls (structural partitions), Driving rain, Laboratory studies, Moisture damage, Specific information, Ventilated system, Facades
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-27666 (URN)2-s2.0-84986893121 (Scopus ID)9788027102488 (ISBN)
Conference
Central Europe Towards Sustainable Building 2016: Innovations for Sustainable Future (CESB 2016), June 22-24, 2016, Prague, Czech Republic
Note

References: Samuelson, I., Mjornell, K., Jansson, A., Moisture damage in rendered, undrained, well insulated stud walls (2008) Proc 8th Symposium of Building Physics in the Nordic Countries, , Copenhagen; Jansson, A., Actions against moisture damage in etic walls (2014) 10th Nordic Symposium on Building Physics, , 15-19 June 2014; Lund, Sweden; Olsson, L., Long-Time field moisture measurements in wooden walls with different types offacades: Focus on driving rain tightness (2015) 6th International Building Physics Conference, IBPC, , 14-17 June; Torino, Italy2015; Woodbury, C., (2009) Stucco in New Residential Construction -A Position Paper Includes -Updates to Original Information, , Division BI, editor. Woodbury, Minnesota: City of Woodbury; Olsson, L., Results from laboratory measurements of wind driven tightness in different types of facades 10th Nordic Symposium on Building Physics, , 2014-06-15; Lund, Sweden. Lund, Sweden2014., 954-9; Gustavsson, B., (2009) Fonstermontage (SP Rapport 2009:35). Boras: SP Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, p. 35. , Energiteknik; 2009; CMHC. Water Penetration Resistance of Windows-Study of Manufacturing, Building Design, Installation and Maintenance Factors (Technical Series 03-124). Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation; 2003Bednar, T., Hagentoft, C.-E., Annex 55-Reliability of Energy Efficient Building Retrofltting-Probability Assessment of Performance and Cost (RAP-RETRO), Report 2015: 7, p. 2015. , Goteborg: Chalmers Tekniska Hogskola.:; Tenwolde, A., A review of ASHRAE standard 160-criteria for moisture control design analysis in buildings (2011) J Test Eval., 39 (1); Ngudjiharto, E., Tariku, F., Fazio, P., (2014) Window Sill Defects. 14th Canadian Conference on Building Science and Technology, , Toronto, Canada; Van Den Bossche, N., De Meersman, G., Devos, L., Maertens, S., Janssens, A., Watertightness of window-wall interfaces in wood-frame construction (2014) 10th Nordic Symposium on Building Physics, , Lund, Sweden; De Meersman, G., Van Den Bossche, N., Janssens, A., A parametric HAM study of the risk assessment of water ingress in Wooden Constructions (2014) 10th Nordic Symposium on Building Physics, , Lund, Sweden; SIS. SS-EN 12865 Hygrothermal performance of building components and building elements-Determination of the resistance of external wall systems to driving rain under pulsating air pressure. The European Standard EN 12865:2001 has the status of a Swedish Standard. Stockholm: SIS, Swedish Standards Institute; 2001A4 -

Available from: 2016-12-22 Created: 2016-12-21 Last updated: 2019-06-24Bibliographically approved
Adeboye, P. T., Bettiga, M., Aldaeus, F., Larsson, P. T. & Olsson, L. (2015). Catabolism of coniferyl aldehyde, ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid by Saccharomyces cerevisiae yields less toxic products. Microbial Cell Factories, 14(1), Article ID 149.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Catabolism of coniferyl aldehyde, ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid by Saccharomyces cerevisiae yields less toxic products
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Microbial Cell Factories, ISSN 1475-2859, E-ISSN 1475-2859, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 149Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Lignocellulosic substrates and pulping process streams are of increasing relevance to biorefineries for second generation biofuels and biochemical production. They are known to be rich in sugars and inhibitors such as phenolic compounds, organic acids and furaldehydes. Phenolic compounds are a group of aromatic compounds known to be inhibitory to fermentative organisms. It is known that inhibition of Sacchromyces cerevisiae varies among phenolic compounds and the yeast is capable of in situ catabolic conversion and metabolism of some phenolic compounds. In an approach to engineer a S. cerevisiae strain with higher tolerance to phenolic inhibitors, we selectively investigated the metabolic conversion and physiological effects of coniferyl aldehyde, ferulic acid, and p-coumaric acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Aerobic batch cultivations were separately performed with each of the three phenolic compounds. Conversion of each of the phenolic compounds was observed on time-based qualitative analysis of the culture broth to monitor various intermediate and final metabolites. Result: Coniferyl aldehyde was rapidly converted within the first 24 h, while ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid were more slowly converted over a period of 72 h. The conversion of the three phenolic compounds was observed to involved several transient intermediates that were concurrently formed and converted to other phenolic products. Although there were several conversion products formed from coniferyl aldehyde, ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid, the conversion products profile from the three compounds were similar. On the physiology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the maximum specific growth rates of the yeast was not affected in the presence of coniferyl aldehyde or ferulic acid, but it was significantly reduced in the presence of p-coumaric acid. The biomass yields on glucose were reduced to 73 and 54 % of the control in the presence of coniferyl aldehyde and ferulic acid, respectively, biomass yield increased to 127 % of the control in the presence of p-coumaric acid. Coniferyl aldehyde, ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid and their conversion products were screened for inhibition, the conversion products were less inhibitory than coniferyl aldehyde, ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid, indicating that the conversion of the three compounds by Saccharomyces cerevisiae was also a detoxification process. Conclusion: We conclude that the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde, ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid into less inhibitory compounds is a form of stress response and a detoxification process. We hypothesize that all phenolic compounds are converted by Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the same metabolic process. We suggest that the enhancement of the ability of S. cerevisiae to convert toxic phenolic compounds into less inhibitory compounds is a potent route to developing a S. cerevisiae with superior tolerance to phenolic compounds.

Keywords
Biorefinery, Coniferyl aldehyde, Conversion, Ferulic acidp-Coumaric acid, Phenolic compounds
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-752 (URN)10.1186/s12934-015-0338-x (DOI)2-s2.0-84959110976 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-14 Created: 2016-08-03 Last updated: 2019-07-02Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4211-4885

Search in DiVA

Show all publications
v. 2.35.7