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Publications (10 of 18) Show all publications
Collier, E. S., Normann, A., Harris, K. L., Oberrauter, L.-M. & Bergman, P. (2022). Making More Sustainable Food Choices One Meal at a Time: Psychological and Practical Aspects of Meat Reduction and Substitution. Foods, 11(9), Article ID 1182.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making More Sustainable Food Choices One Meal at a Time: Psychological and Practical Aspects of Meat Reduction and Substitution
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2022 (English)In: Foods, E-ISSN 2304-8158, Vol. 11, no 9, article id 1182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Switching out meat in favour of plant-based alternatives such as meat substitutes is an important step towards eating more sustainably. Here, the aim was to identify and explore the specific barriers experienced by Swedish consumers when replacing meat with more sustainable alternatives. All meat-eating participants in this study reported some interest in reducing their meat consumption. Aspects of home-use and central-location test methods were combined by using a digital conferencing system to host cooking sessions and focus group discussions online, which was shown to be a viable setup even in this hands-on setting. The discussions targeted participants’ experience preparing meals using meat substitutes as well as their perceived motivators and barriers to reducing meat consumption. Four themes identified through thematic analysis indicated that meat-eating participants, despite their desire or intent to reduce their meat consumption, experienced barriers relating to the following: internal conflict due to holding multiple positive and negative beliefs about meat simultaneously (ambivalence), justification of eating meat (rationalisation), a desire for variety in and control over their food choices (agency), and sensitivity to the views and expectations of other people and the situational context regarding meat (social and structural factors). Possible strategies to support ambivalent individuals in aligning their behaviour with their beliefs instead of vice versa are discussed in the context of the meat paradox. Agency and practical skills, including increasing knowledge in preparing meals with plant-based proteins, likely play a role in bridging this intention–behaviour gap. © 2022 by the authors. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
climate change, consumer behaviour, cooking at home, meat paradox, meat substitutes
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-59223 (URN)10.3390/foods11091182 (DOI)2-s2.0-85129301895 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Svenska Forskningsrådet Formas, 2018-01867; Funding text 1: Funding: This research was funded by FORMAS—Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, grant number 2018-01867.

Available from: 2022-06-10 Created: 2022-06-10 Last updated: 2023-06-05Bibliographically approved
Niimi, J., Hörlin, E., Oberrauter, L.-M., Sörensen, V., Norman, C., Normann, A., . . . Bergman, P. (2022). Sample discrimination through profiling with rate all that apply (RATA) using consumers is similar between home use test (HUT) and central location test (CLT). Food Quality and Preference, 95, Article ID 104377.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sample discrimination through profiling with rate all that apply (RATA) using consumers is similar between home use test (HUT) and central location test (CLT)
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2022 (English)In: Food Quality and Preference, ISSN 0950-3293, E-ISSN 1873-6343, Vol. 95, article id 104377Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The impact of testing locations, home use test (HUT) and central location test (CLT) on consumer evaluations of food products using rate all that apply (RATA) was investigated. As a case study, eight cold cuts were evaluated: four vegetarian/vegan and four meat-based products. A between-subjects design was used, whereby consumers were randomly allocated to either HUT or CLT test location (58 and 71 consumers, respectively). To retain as much similarity as possible across locations, consumers in both groups received identical bags of products with palate cleansers and instructions. Consumers evaluated the products using a lexicon consisting of 32 sensory attributes based on similar studies and benchtop tasting, using RATA with 7pt scales. A total of 30 and 31 attributes differed significantly (p < 0.05) across the products for HUT and CLT, respectively. Sample discrimination was similar between the two locations. Location significantly (p < 0.05) affected discrimination of 14 attributes, but a particular location having consistently higher attribute means was not observed. Bootstrapping of the attribute means per product showed no significant differences between the two testing locations, and multilevel regression models using Bayesian inference did not reveal marked differences in expected ratings between locations. Further comparisons of sample discrimination patterns through principal component analysis showed that the two locations were very similar, including the overlap of confidence ellipses. The between-subjects design strengthens the results: that comparable sensory profiles were obtained from different consumers in different testing locations supports the notion that RATA data from consumers can be reliably collected for relatively sensorially distinct products with minimal data compromise.

Keywords
RATA, CLT, HUT, Profiling, Consumers
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-56383 (URN)10.1016/j.foodqual.2021.104377 (DOI)
Available from: 2021-09-08 Created: 2021-09-08 Last updated: 2024-03-06Bibliographically approved
Timotijevic, L., Astley, S., Bogaardt, M. J., Bucher, T., Carr, I., Copani, G., . . . Zimmermann, K. (2021). Designing a research infrastructure (RI) on food behaviour and health: Balancing user needs, business model, governance mechanisms and technology. Trends in Food Science & Technology, 116, 405-414
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing a research infrastructure (RI) on food behaviour and health: Balancing user needs, business model, governance mechanisms and technology
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2021 (English)In: Trends in Food Science & Technology, ISSN 0924-2244, E-ISSN 1879-3053, Vol. 116, p. 405-414Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A better understanding of food-related behaviour and its determinants can be achieved through harmonisation and linking of the various data-sources and knowledge platforms. Scope: We describe the key decision-making in the development of a prototype of the Determinants and Intake Platform (DI Platform), a data platform that aims to harmonise and link data on consumer food behaviour. It will be part of the Food Nutrition Health Research Infrastructure (FNH-RI) that will facilitate health, social and food sciences. Approach: The decision-making was based on the evidence of user needs and data characteristics that guided the specification of the key building blocks of the DI Platform. Eight studies were carried out, including consumer online survey; interview studies of key DI Platform stakeholders; desk research and workshops. Key findings: Consumers were most willing to share data with universities, then industry and government. Trust, risk perception and altruism predicted willingness to share. For most other stakeholders non-proprietary data was most likely to be shared. Lack of data standards, and incentives for sharing were the main barriers for sharing data among the key stakeholders. The value of various data types would hugely increase if linked with other sources. Finding the right balance between optimizing data sharing and minimizing ethical and legal risks was considered a key challenge. Conclusions: The development of DI Platform is based on careful balancing of the user, technical, business, legal and ethical requirements, following the FAIR principles and the need for financial sustainability, technical flexibility, transparency and multi-layered organisational governance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2021
Keywords
AI, Big data, Data governance, Data platform, Determinants, e-infrastructure, Food consumption, Food intake, Food nutrition, Omics
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-55839 (URN)10.1016/j.tifs.2021.07.022 (DOI)2-s2.0-85111930621 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding details: European Commission, EC; Funding details: Københavns Universitet, KU; Funding details: Aalto-Yliopisto; Funding details: University of Surrey; Funding details: Wageningen University and Research, WUR; Funding details: Quadram Institute Bioscience; Funding text 1: This commentary aims to provide insight into the complex decision making on the design of DI Platform carried out within the RICHFIELDS project 2 2 (funded by the EU under the “Research Infrastructures” funding stream). It was based on the evidence of user needs and data characteristics assessed in the project that guided the specification of the key building blocks of the DI Platform. It aims to highlight the rationale used for balancing of requirements for designing and implementing such an RI. The final design of the DI Platform is represented in Fig. 1 – the Minimum Viable Offer specifies the services offered. Currently, the discussions are ongoing within the scientific research community to eventually arrive at a future implementation of an effective and sustainable Food Nutrition and Health Research Infrastructure (FNH-RI), which will integrate health, food and social sciences as part of the European Roadmap of research infrastructures. DI Platform would form a part of the FNH-RI via its DATA services that aim to facilitate sharing of the data and resources on consumer food behaviours and their determinants. The data on environmental impact will not form a part of DI Platform, but will be linked through the FNH-RI with other relevant data platforms such as SUSFANS. 4 3 4; Funding text 2: The Consortium partners are: Wageningen Economic Research (NL), the German Institute of Food Technologies (DE), European Food Information Resource AISBL (BE), Jozef Stefan Institute (SI), Wageningen University (NL), University of Surrey (UK), RISE Research Institute of Sweden, Aalborg University (DK), Javier de la Cueva & Asociados (ES), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (CH), European Food Information Council (BE), Quadram Institute Bioscience (UK), Institute of Industrial Technologies and Automation-National Research Council of Italy (IT), Centre for European Nutrition and Health (FR), Aalto University (FI), GS1 Denmark (DK). The Scientific Coordination Team are: Prof. Pieter van't Veer (chair; Wageningen University), Professor Monique Raats (coordinator Phase 1; University of Surrey), Professor Bent Egberg Mikkelsen (coordinator Phase 2; Aalborg University), Mr. Krijn Poppe (coordinator Phase 3; Wageningen Economic Research) and Dr. Paul Finglas (accessory member; Quadram Institute Bioscience). The members of the Project Advisory Board, appointed in June 2016, are: Dr. Inge Tetens (Chair; University of Copenhagen), Dr. Igor Spiroski (IPH Macedonia), Mrs. Anneke van Kollenburg (ENECO), Dr. Harriet Teare (University of Oxford), Mr. Fred van Alphen (IT manager), Mr. Christian Graversen (Welfare Tech) and Dr. Marijntje Bakker (JPI HDHL).

Available from: 2021-08-23 Created: 2021-08-23 Last updated: 2023-05-09Bibliographically approved
Collier, E. S., Oberrauter, L.-M., Normann, A., Norman, C., Svensson, M., Niimi, J. & Bergman, P. (2021). Identifying barriers to decreasing meat consumption and increasing acceptance of meat substitutes among Swedish consumers. Appetite, 167, Article ID 105643.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identifying barriers to decreasing meat consumption and increasing acceptance of meat substitutes among Swedish consumers
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2021 (English)In: Appetite, ISSN 0195-6663, E-ISSN 1095-8304, Vol. 167, article id 105643Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A key lifestyle change people could make to reduce their environmental impact is to reduce their meat consumption. However, meat is still a staple in many people's diet, and some consumers are reluctant to cut down. Meat substitutes, if accepted as adequate replacements for meat, may offer a suitable alternative without leaving consumers feeling dissatisfied. The aim of the present study was to identify psychological barriers to reducing meat consumption and increasing use of meat substitutes among Swedish consumers. Participants engaged in focus group discussions around purchasing, preparing, and consuming meat and meat substitutes. Four main themes were identified through thematic analysis: uncertainty, scepticism, health, and identity. These are discussed in relation to previous work on the barriers to reducing meat consumption. Strategies to communicate the environmental impact of meat to consumers and effect change through behavioural interventions are considered. © 2021 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2021
Keywords
Behavioural change, Climate change, Consumer behaviour, Environment, Meat substitutes, adult, article, behavior change, consumer attitude, controlled study, environmental impact, human, meat consumption, meat substitute, purchasing, thematic analysis, uncertainty
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-56005 (URN)10.1016/j.appet.2021.105643 (DOI)2-s2.0-85112235277 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding details: Svenska Forskningsrådet Formas, 2018–01867; Funding text 1: This work was supported by FORMAS - Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning , grant number 2018–01867 .

Available from: 2021-08-26 Created: 2021-08-26 Last updated: 2023-06-05Bibliographically approved
Bolos, L., Lagerkvist, C.-J., Normann, A. & Wendin, K. (2021). In the eye of the beholder: Expected and actual liking for apples with visual imperfections. Food Quality and Preference, 87, Article ID 104065.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In the eye of the beholder: Expected and actual liking for apples with visual imperfections
2021 (English)In: Food Quality and Preference, ISSN 0950-3293, E-ISSN 1873-6343, Vol. 87, article id 104065Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Food appearance is an important determinant for expected and actual liking, but some food is not even available for purchase due to visual imperfections. In two studies conducted with 130 participants in Sweden, we measured consumers’ expected and actual liking for different apples with three types of visual imperfection (color, shape and damage). We investigated the effects of apples’ visual characteristics on expected liking and whether or not this relationship is mediated by emotions and attitudes. Secondly, we investigated how actual liking differed between the groups of apples, and how it differed from expected liking. Results indicated that attitudes are the strongest mediator between visual characteristics of apples and expected liking. Moreover, participants indicated higher expected liking for color and shape imperfections relative to damaged apples. Results from the second study indicated a significant difference between expected and actual liking, and less variability in actual liking between the apple groups relative to the variability in expected liking. It can be concluded that the visual characteristics of apples influence both expected and actual liking, the practical implication for retailers being a need to carefully distinguish between the different types of visual sub-optimality and to keep the products that have a higher chance to be chosen (sub-optimal in shape and colour). Thus, these results generate a clearer understanding of visual sub-optimality, and can be incorporated in strategies for reducing food waste in stores. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2021
Keywords
Emotions, Expected and actual liking, Food, Moderation, Visual characteristics
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-48765 (URN)10.1016/j.foodqual.2020.104065 (DOI)2-s2.0-85090329866 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Svenska ForskningsrÃ¥det Formas; Funding text 1: The study was conducted as part of the project COnsumers in a SUStainable food supply chain (COSUS) funded by the Swedish Research Council Formas . The authors would like to thank RISE, Sweden’s research institute and innovation partner, for working with us and making their research laboratory in Gothenburg available for this study. Finally, we would like to thank our colleague, Jacob Dalgaard Christensen, for his contribution with writing the R-code for the mediation analysis.

Available from: 2020-09-14 Created: 2020-09-14 Last updated: 2023-05-09Bibliographically approved
Aschemann-Witzel, J., Otterbring, T., de Hooge, I., Normann, A., Rohm, H., Almli, V. & Oostindjer, M. (2020). Consumer associations about other buyers of suboptimal food – And what it means for food waste avoidance actions. Food Quality and Preference, 80, Article ID 103808.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consumer associations about other buyers of suboptimal food – And what it means for food waste avoidance actions
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2020 (English)In: Food Quality and Preference, ISSN 0950-3293, E-ISSN 1873-6343, Vol. 80, article id 103808Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One approach to tackling the imminent sustainability problem of food waste is to sell suboptimal food which otherwise might be wasted. However, understanding how the action of buying price-reduced suboptimal food is influenced by the fact that the consumer purchases it publicly while observed by others is yet unexplored. The present research investigates which associations consumers form when they see other consumers purchasing suboptimal foods. In an online experimental survey, consumers of five European countries checked every word that applied (CATA) from a set of items that described what choosing a food item told them about an acquaintance they met in the store in terms of his or her traits. The food item was optimal or suboptimal, fresh or packaged food, and presented with a communication that either underlined a budget saving benefit or a contribution to avoiding food waste. Results show that consumers of suboptimal products are regarded as economic and thrifty, as well as frugal and environmentally concerned. The associations with consumers of optimal products are more diverse, and include both positive and negative wordings, ranging from successful to fussy and inattentive. Consumers’ own level of environmental concerns and value consciousness explain the degree to which they perceive another consumer to have similar traits, revealing that consumers project their own traits on others. Findings imply that stores offering suboptimal food should present and communicate the items in line with the characteristics of the store's target group, and that suboptimal food choices can trigger positive associations. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2020
Keywords
Association, Communication, Food waste, Identity, Norms, Suboptimal food
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-43393 (URN)10.1016/j.foodqual.2019.103808 (DOI)2-s2.0-85073221738 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-01-31 Created: 2020-01-31 Last updated: 2023-05-09Bibliographically approved
Normann, A., Röding, M. & Wendin, K. (2019). Sustainable fruit consumption: The influence of color, shape and damage on consumer sensory perception and liking of different apples. Sustainability, 11(17), Article ID 4626.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable fruit consumption: The influence of color, shape and damage on consumer sensory perception and liking of different apples
2019 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 17, article id 4626Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sustainable food production and consumption are currently key issues. About one third of food produced for human consumption is wasted. In developed countries, consumers are responsible for the largest amount of food waste throughout the supply chain. The unwillingness to purchase and consume suboptimal food products is an important cause of food waste, however, the reasons behind this are still insufficiently studied. Our research addresses the question of how combinations of color, shape and damage of apples influence consumer liking and perceived sensory attributes. In a laboratory study based on factorial design of visual appearance (color, shape and damage varied from optimal to suboptimal) a total of 130 consumers evaluated sensory perception of flavor and texture attributes in apple samples. Liking was also evaluated. The results showed a significant difference in liking between an optimal apple and all apple categories with at least two out of three suboptimal properties. Further, it was a clear trend that the optimal apple was perceived as sweeter, crispier, less bitter, and less earthy than all the other apples by the participating consumers, however, the results were not statistically significant. A suboptimal appearance, therefore, had a negative effect on both perception and liking..

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2019
Keywords
Appearance, Apples, Consumer, Perception, Suboptimality, Malus x domestica
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-39919 (URN)10.3390/su11174626 (DOI)2-s2.0-85071963535 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding details: Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet, SLU; Funding details: Svenska Forskningsrådet Formas, 2014-00051; Funding text 1: Laura Andreea Bolos and Carl-Johan Lagerkvist, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, are acknowledged for their participation in discussions and experimental issues. This research was funded by the Swedish Research Council FORMAS as part of the project Consumers in a Sustainable Food Supply Chain (COSUS), grant number 2014-00051.

Available from: 2019-09-27 Created: 2019-09-27 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Aschemann-Witzel, J., Otterbring, T., de Hooge, I. E., Normann, A., Rohm, H., Almli, V. L. & Oostindjer, M. (2019). The who, where and why of choosing suboptimal foods: Consequences for tackling food waste in store. Journal of Cleaner Production, 236, Article ID 117596.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The who, where and why of choosing suboptimal foods: Consequences for tackling food waste in store
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 236, article id 117596Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Food stores have begun to tackle food waste at the point of sale. They do so by selling ‘suboptimal’ food before it is wasted, typically with a price reduction. However, efficiency of this food waste avoidance action can be improved by knowing for which product category, which store type, which accompanying communication, and which consumer characteristics this action works best. This study uses an experimental online survey conducted in five North western European countries to investigate the effect of communication appealing to either self- or others-centred motives in either supermarkets or farmers' markets, for packaged and for fresh food. It is found that both messages – communicating budget saving or an emotional appeal - are effective in increasing choice likelihood. Store type affects choice likelihood of suboptimal packaged, while others-centred values and trust in the store affects choice likelihood for suboptimal fresh food. Communication improves quality perception of suboptimal fresh food. Findings imply that fresh suboptimal foods lend themselves more to be promoted with others-centred messages, or to be targeted at consumers with others-centred values. Sales of suboptimal food in the store should be accompanied by communication, and such efforts to tackle food waste in the store should focus on fresh food in particular.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Communication, Food waste, Quality perception, Store type, Suboptimal food, Value orientation, Industrial engineering, Production engineering, European Countries, Online surveys, Price reductions, Product categories, Quality perceptions, Budget control
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-42672 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2019.07.071 (DOI)2-s2.0-85068898567 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-01-10 Created: 2020-01-10 Last updated: 2023-05-09Bibliographically approved
Maringer, M., Van'T Veer, P., Klepacz, N., Verain, M. C. D., Normann, A., Ekman, S., . . . Geelen, A. (2018). User-documented food consumption data from publicly available apps: An analysis of opportunities and challenges for nutrition research. Nutrition Journal, 17(1), Article ID 59.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>User-documented food consumption data from publicly available apps: An analysis of opportunities and challenges for nutrition research
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2018 (English)In: Nutrition Journal, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 59Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The need for a better understanding of food consumption behaviour within its behavioural context has sparked the interest of nutrition researchers for user-documented food consumption data collected outside the research context using publicly available nutrition apps. The study aims to characterize the scientific, technical, legal and ethical features of this data in order to identify the opportunities and challenges associated with using this data for nutrition research. Method: A search for apps collecting food consumption data was conducted in October 2016 against UK Google Play and iTunes storefronts. 176 apps were selected based on user ratings and English language support. Publicly available information from the app stores and app-related websites was investigated and relevant data extracted and summarized. Our focus was on characteristics related to scientific relevance, data management and legal and ethical governance of user-documented food consumption data. Results: Food diaries are the most common form of data collection, allowing for multiple inputs including generic food items, packaged products, or images. Standards and procedures for compiling food databases used for estimating energy and nutrient intakes remain largely undisclosed. Food consumption data is interlinked with various types of contextual data related to behavioural motivation, physical activity, health, and fitness. While exchange of data between apps is common practise, the majority of apps lack technical documentation regarding data export. There is a similar lack of documentation regarding the implemented terms of use and privacy policies. While users are usually the owners of their data, vendors are granted irrevocable and royalty free licenses to commercially exploit the data. Conclusion: Due to its magnitude, diversity, and interconnectedness, user-documented food consumption data offers promising opportunities for a better understanding of habitual food consumption behaviour and its determinants. Non-standardized or non-documented food data compilation procedures, data exchange protocols and formats, terms of use and privacy statements, however, limit possibilities to integrate, process and share user-documented food consumption data. An ongoing research effort is required, to keep pace with the technical advancements of food consumption apps, their evolving data networks and the legal and ethical regulations related to protecting app users and their personal data.

Keywords
Contextual data, Data management, Diet apps, Dietary intake assessment, Food consumption data, Legal and ethical governance, Research infrastructure, Technological innovations, User-documented data, article, dietary intake, documentation, English (language), feeding behavior, food intake, human, human experiment, licence, motivation, nutrition, physical activity, privacy
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-33967 (URN)10.1186/s12937-018-0366-6 (DOI)2-s2.0-85048262885 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-03 Created: 2018-07-03 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Rohm, H., Oostindjer, M., Aschemann-Witzel, J., Symmank, C., L Almli, V., de Hooge, I. E., . . . Karantininis, K. (2017). Consumers in a Sustainable Food Supply Chain (COSUS): Understanding Consumer Behavior to Encourage Food Waste Reduction.. Foods (Basel, Switzerland), 6(12), Article ID E104.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consumers in a Sustainable Food Supply Chain (COSUS): Understanding Consumer Behavior to Encourage Food Waste Reduction.
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2017 (English)In: Foods (Basel, Switzerland), ISSN 2304-8158, Vol. 6, no 12, article id E104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Consumers are directly and indirectly responsible for a significant fraction of food waste which, for a large part, could be avoided if they were willing to accept food that is suboptimal, i.e., food that deviates in sensory characteristics (odd shape, discoloration), or that has a best-before date which is approaching or has passed, but that is still perfectly fine to eat. The choice to accept or discard suboptimal food is taken either before or after purchase (hence, in the retail store or in the household). The aim of the European research project COSUS (Consumers in a sustainable food supply chain) was to increase consumer acceptance of suboptimal food, before and after purchase, by implementing targeted strategies that are based on consumer insights, and that are feasible for and acceptable by the food sector. To reach this aim, different methodological approaches were applied to analyze this issue, to experiment with different aspects, and to test the resulting interventions. Each of these approaches was undertaken by competent consortium partners from Denmark, Germany, Norway, Sweden and The Netherlands. The project finally provides validated strategies to promote the distribution and consumption of suboptimal foods, thereby improving resource efficiency in the food chain and contributing to a more sustainable food supply.

Keywords
choice behavior, consumer perception, food waste, suboptimal food
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-33347 (URN)10.3390/foods6120104 (DOI)29186883 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-01 Created: 2018-03-01 Last updated: 2023-05-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0408-3910

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