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Elliott, D. C., Meier, D., Oasmaa, A., van De Beld, B., Bridgwater, A. V. & Marklund, M. (2017). Results of the International Energy Agency Round Robin on Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil Production. Energy & Fuels, 31(5), 5111-5119
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Results of the International Energy Agency Round Robin on Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil Production
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2017 (English)In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 5111-5119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An international round robin study of the production of fast pyrolysis bio-oil was undertaken. A total of 15 institutions in six countries contributed. Three biomass samples were distributed to the laboratories for processing in fast pyrolysis reactors. Samples of the bio-oil produced were transported to a central analytical laboratory for analysis. The round robin was focused on validating the pyrolysis community understanding of production of fast pyrolysis bio-oil by providing a common feedstock for bio-oil preparation. The round robin included: distribution of three feedstock samples, hybrid poplar, wheat straw, and a blend of lignocellulosic biomasses, from a common source to each participating laboratory, preparation of fast pyrolysis bio-oil in each laboratory with the three feedstocks provided, and return of the three bio-oil products (minimum of 500 mL) with operational description to a central analytical laboratory for bio-oil property determination. The analyses of interest were CHN, S, trace element analysis, water, ash, solids, pyrolytic lignin, density, viscosity, carboxylic acid number, and accelerated aging of bio-oil. In addition, an effort was made to compare the bio-oil components to the products of analytical pyrolysis through gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. The results showed that clear differences can occur in fast pyrolysis bio-oil properties by applying different process configurations and reactor designs in small scale. The comparison to the analytical pyrolysis method suggested that pyrolysis (Py)-GC/MS could serve as a rapid qualitative screening method for bio-oil composition when produced in small-scale fluid-bed reactors. Gel permeation chromatography was also applied to determine molecular weight information. Furthermore, hot vapor filtration generally resulted in the most favorable bio-oil product, with respect to water, solids, viscosity, and carboxylic acid number. These results can be helpful in understanding the variation in bio-oil production methods and their effects on bio-oil product composition.

Keywords
Biofuels, Carboxylic acids, Chemical analysis, Chemical laboratories, Chromatography, Feedstocks, Filtration, Gas chromatography, Gel permeation chromatography, Laboratories, Routers, Trace elements, Viscosity, Water filtration, Well stimulation, Analytical laboratories, Fast pyrolysis bio-oil, Gas chromatography/Mass spectrometry, International energy agency, Lignocellulosic biomass, Operational description, Qualitative screening, Trace element analysis, Pyrolysis
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-30916 (URN)10.1021/acs.energyfuels.6b03502 (DOI)2-s2.0-85020517687 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-09-06 Created: 2017-09-06 Last updated: 2019-01-22Bibliographically approved
Jannasch, A.-K., Molinder, R., Marklund, M. & Hermansson, S. (2016). ANALYSIS OF P2G/P2L SYSTEMS IN PITEÅ/NORRBOTTEN FOR COMBINED PRODUCTION OF LIQUID AND GASEOUS BIOFUELS: Report from an f3 project.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ANALYSIS OF P2G/P2L SYSTEMS IN PITEÅ/NORRBOTTEN FOR COMBINED PRODUCTION OF LIQUID AND GASEOUS BIOFUELS: Report from an f3 project
2016 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This report is the result of a collaborative project within the Swedish Knowledge Centre for Renewable Transportation Fuels (f3). f3 is a networking organization, which focuses on development of environmentally, economically and socially sustainable renewable fuels, and

 Provides a broad, scientifically based and trustworthy source of knowledge for industry, governments and public authorities,

 Carries through system oriented research related to the entire renewable fuels value chain,

 Acts as national platform stimulating interaction nationally and internationally.

f3 partners include Sweden’s most active universities and research institutes within the field, as well as a broad range of industry companies with high relevance. f3 has no political agenda and does not conduct lobbying activities for specific fuels or systems, nor for the f3 partners’ respective areas of interest.

The f3 centre is financed jointly by the centre partners, the Swedish Energy Agency and the region of Västra Götaland. f3 also receives funding from Vinnova (Sweden’s innovation agency) as a Swedish advocacy platform towards Horizon 2020. Chalmers Industriteknik (CIT) functions as the host of the f3 organization (see www.f3centre.se).

Publisher
p. 40
Series
f3 The Swedish Knowledge Centre for Renewable Transportation Fuels, ; f3 2016:10
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-27924 (URN)
Available from: 2017-01-20 Created: 2017-01-20 Last updated: 2018-08-22
Johansson, A.-C., Wiinikka, H., Sandström, L., Marklund, M., Öhrman, O. G. W. & Narvesjö, J. (2016). Characterization of pyrolysis products produced from different Nordic biomass types in a cyclone pilot plant. Fuel processing technology, 146, 9-19
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization of pyrolysis products produced from different Nordic biomass types in a cyclone pilot plant
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2016 (English)In: Fuel processing technology, ISSN 0378-3820, E-ISSN 1873-7188, Vol. 146, p. 9-19Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pyrolysis is a promising thermochemical technology for converting biomass to energy, chemicals and/or fuels. The objective of the present paper was to characterize fast pyrolysis products and to study pyrolysis oil fractionation. The products were obtained from different Nordic forest and agricultural feedstocks in a pilot scale cyclone pyrolysis plant at three different reactor temperatures. The results show that the main elements (C, H and O) and chemical compositions of the products produced from stem wood, willow, forest residue and reed canary grass are in general terms rather similar, while the products obtained from bark differ to some extent. The oil produced from bark had a higher H/Ceff ratio and heating value which can be correlated to a higher amount of pyrolytic lignin and extractives when compared with oils produced from the other feedstocks. Regardless of the original feedstock, the composition of the different pyrolysis oil fractions (condensed and aerosol) differs significantly from each other. However this opens up the possibility to use specifically selected fractions in targeted applications. An increased reactor temperature generally results in a higher amount of water and water insoluble material, primarily as small lignin derived oligomers, in the produced oil.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Aerosol, Cyclone, Nordic biomass, Oil fractions, Products, Pyrolysis
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-411 (URN)10.1016/j.fuproc.2016.02.006 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-06-23 Created: 2016-06-23 Last updated: 2019-08-21Bibliographically approved
Weiland, F., Hedman, H., Wiinikka, H. & Marklund, M. (2016). Pressurized entrained flow gasification of pulverized biomass - Experiences from pilot scale operation. Chemical Engineering Transactions, 50, 325-330
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pressurized entrained flow gasification of pulverized biomass - Experiences from pilot scale operation
2016 (English)In: Chemical Engineering Transactions, ISSN 1974-9791, E-ISSN 2283-9216, Vol. 50, p. 325-330Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One of the goals in the national energy strategy of Sweden is that the vehicle fleet should be independent of fossil fuels by 2030. To reach that goal and to domestically secure for supply of alternative fuels, one of the suggested routes is methanol production from forest residues via pressurized and oxygen blown entrained flow gasification. In this context, ongoing industrial research in a 1 MWth gasification pilot plant is carried out at SP Energy Technology Center (SP ETC) in Pitea, Sweden. The plant is operated with pulverized or liquid fuels at process pressures up to 10 bar and this work summarizes the experiences from over 600 hours of operation with forest based biomass fuels. This paper covers results from thorough process characterization as well as results from extractive samplings of both permanent gases and particulate matter (soot) from inside the hot gasifier. Furthermore, the challenges with pressurized entrained flow gasification of pulverized biomass are discussed. During the characterization work, four of the most important process parameters (i.e. oxygen stoichiometric ratio (λ), fuel load, process pressure and fuel particle size distribution) were varied with the purpose of studying the effect on the process performance and the resulting syngas quality. The experimental results showed that the maximum cold gas efficiency (CGE) based on all combustible species in the syngas was 75% (at λ=0.30), whereas the corresponding value based only on CO and H2 (with respect to further MeOH synthesis from the syngas) was 70% (at λ=0.35). As expected, the pilot experiments showed that both the soot yield and soot particle size was reduced by increasing λ. One of the additional conclusions from this work was that; minimizing heat losses from the gasifier is of utmost importance to optimize the process performance regarding energy efficiency (i.e. CGE). Therefore, a well-insulated refractory lined gasifier is the primary alternative in regards to reactor design to maximize the CGE. Future development of the PEBG process should focus on identifying suitable hot-phase refractory, that exhibit long life-time and can sustain the alkali-rich biomass ash under gasification conditions. In addition to this, the remaining issue around how to improve the slag flow from the reactor, by additives or fuel mixing, should be investigated.

Keywords
Alternative fuels, Biomass, Energy efficiency, Fleet operations, Forestry, Fossil fuels, Fuel additives, Fuels, Industrial research, Methanol fuels, Oxygen supply, Particle size, Particle size analysis, Pilot plants, Refractory materials, Slags, Soot, Synthesis gas, Cold gas efficiency, Energy technologies, Entrained flow gasification, Methanol production, Pressurized entrained flow gasification, Process characterization, Process performance, Stoichiometric ratio, Gasification
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-27682 (URN)10.3303/CET1650055 (DOI)2-s2.0-84976870478 (Scopus ID)9788895608419 (ISBN)
Note

References: Börjesson, M., Ahlgren, E., Modelling transportation fuel pathways: Achieving cost-effective oil use reduction in passenger cars in Sweden (2012) Technological Forecasting and Social Change, 79, pp. 801-818; Carlsson, P., Ma, C., Molinder, R., Weiland, F., Wiinikka, H., Öhman, M., Öhrman, O., Slag formation during oxygen-blown entrained-flow gasification of stem wood (2014) Energy and Fuels, 28, pp. 6941-6952; Higman, C., Van Der Burgt, M., (2008) Gasification, , 2nd Edition, GPP, Burlington, MA, USA; Leijenhorst, E.J., Assink, D., Van De Beld, L., Weiland, F., Wiinikka, H., Carlsson, P., Öhrman, O.G.W., Entrained flow gasification of straw- and wood-derived pyrolysis oil in a pressurized oxygen blown gasifier (2015) Biomass and Bioenergy, 79, pp. 166-176; Öhrman, O.G.W., Weiland, F., Pettersson, E., Johansson, A.-C., Hedman, H., Pedersen, M., Pressurized oxygen blown entrained flow gasification of a biorefinery lignin residue (2013) Fuel Processing Technology, 115, pp. 130-138; Swedish Government, (2009) En Sammanhållen Klimat-och Energipolitik - Energi, , Swedish Government, Stockholm, Sweden; Warnatz, J., Maas, U., Dibble, R.W., (2006) Combustion - Pysical and Chemical Fundamentals, Modeling and Simulation, Experiments, Pullutant Formation, , 4th ed., Springer, Berlin, Germany; Weiland, F., Hedman, H., Marklund, M., Wiinikka, H., Öhrman, O., Gebart, R., Pressurized oxygen blown entrained-flow gasification of wood powder (2013) Energy and Fuels, 27, pp. 932-941; Weiland, F., Nordwaeger, M., Olofsson, I., Wiinikka, H., Nordin, A., Entrained flow gasification of torrefied wood residues (2014) Fuel Processing Technology, 125, pp. 51-58; Weiland, F., Wiinikka, H., Hedman, H., Wennebro, J., Pettersson, E., Gebart, R., Influence of process parameters on the performance of an oxygen blown entrained flow gasifier (2015) Fuel, 153, pp. 510-519; Woolcock, P., Brown, R., A review of cleaning technologies for biomass-derived syngas (2013) Biomass and Bioenergy, 52, pp. 54-84

Available from: 2016-12-22 Created: 2016-12-21 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Sandström, L., Johansson, A.-C., Wiinikka, H., Öhrman, O. G. W. & Marklund, M. (2016). Pyrolysis of Nordic biomass types in a cyclone pilot plant — Mass balances and yields. Fuel processing technology, 152, 274-284
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pyrolysis of Nordic biomass types in a cyclone pilot plant — Mass balances and yields
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2016 (English)In: Fuel processing technology, ISSN 0378-3820, E-ISSN 1873-7188, Vol. 152, p. 274-284Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fast pyrolysis of biomass results in a renewable product usually denoted pyrolysis oil or bio-oil, which has been suggested to be used as a direct substitute for fuel oil or as a feedstock for production of transportation fuels and/or chemicals. In the present work, fast pyrolysis of stem wood (originated from pine and spruce), willow, reed canary grass, brown forest residue and bark has been performed in a pilot scale cyclone reactor. The experiments were based on a biomass feeding rate of 20 kg/h at three different reactor temperatures. At the reference condition, pyrolysis of stem wood, willow, reed canary grass, and forest residue resulted in organic liquid yields in the range of 41 to 45% w/w, while pyrolysis of bark resulted in lower organic liquid yields. Two fractions of pyrolysis oil were obtained, denoted as the condensed and the aerosol fraction. Most of the water soluble molecules were collected in the condensed fraction, whereas the yield of water insoluble, heavy lignin molecules was higher in the aerosol fraction. Based on the results of the present work, willow, reed canary grass and forest residue are considered as promising raw materials for production of pyrolysis oil in a cyclone reactor.

Keywords
Biomass, Cyclone, Pilot, Pyrolysis, Yield, Aerosols, Forestry, Molecules, Petroleum transportation, Pilot plants, Storms, Condensed fraction, Reactor temperatures, Reference condition, Renewable products, Transportation fuels, Water-soluble molecule
National Category
Bioenergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-27594 (URN)10.1016/j.fuproc.2016.06.015 (DOI)2-s2.0-84977487588 (Scopus ID)
Note

References: Bridgwater, A.V., Review of fast pyrolysis of biomass and product upgrading (2012) Biomass Bioenergy, 38, pp. 68-94; Leijenhorst, E.J., Assink, D., van de Beld, L., Weiland, F., Wiinikka, H., Carlsson, P., Öhrman, O.G.W., Entrained flow gasification of straw- and wood-derived pyrolysis oil in a pressurized oxygen blown gasifier (2015) Biomass Bioenergy, 79, pp. 166-176; Vispute, T.P., Zhang, H., Sanna, A., Xiao, R., Huber, G.W., Renewable chemical commodity feedstocks from integrated catalytic processing of pyrolysis oils (2010) Science, 330, pp. 1222-1227; Radlein, D.S.A.G., Mason, S.L., Piskorz, J., Scott, D.S., Hydrocarbons from the catalytic pyrolysis of biomass (1991) Energy Fuel, 5, pp. 760-763; Czernik, S., Bridgwater, A.V., Overview of applications of biomass fast pyrolysis oil (2004) Energy Fuel, 18, pp. 590-598; Elliott, D.C., Historical developments in hydroprocessing bio-oils (2007) Energy Fuel, 21, pp. 1792-1815; Meier, D., Van De Beld, B., Bridgwater, A.V., Elliott, D.C., Oasmaa, A., Preto, F., State-of-the-art of fast pyrolysis in IEA bioenergy member countries (2013) Renew. Sust. Energ. Rev., 20, pp. 619-641; Isahak, W.N.R.W., Hisham, M.W.M., Yarmo, M.A., Yun Hin, T.Y., A review on bio-oil production from biomass by using pyrolysis method (2012) Renew. Sust. Energ. Rev., 16, pp. 5910-5923; Lédé, J., Broust, F., Ndiaye, F.T., Ferrer, M., Properties of bio-oils produced by biomass fast pyrolysis in a cyclone reactor (2007) Fuel, 86, pp. 1800-1810; Wiinikka, H., Carlsson, P., Johansson, A.C., Gullberg, M., Ylipää, C., Lundgren, M., Sandström, L., Fast pyrolysis of stem wood in a pilot-scale cyclone reactor (2015) Energy Fuel, 29, pp. 3158-3167; Brewer, C.E., Schmidt-Rohr, K., Satrio, J.A., Brown, R.C., Characterization of biochar from fast pyrolysis and gasification systems (2009) Environ. Prog. Sustainable Energy, 28, pp. 386-396; Funke, A., Niebel, A., Richter, D., Abbas, M.M., Müller, A.K., Radloff, S., Paneru, M., Sauer, J., Fast pyrolysis char — assessment of alternative uses within the bioliq® concept (2016) Bioresour. Technol., 200, pp. 905-913; Alvarez, J., Lopez, G., Amutio, M., Bilbao, J., Olazar, M., Upgrading the rice husk char obtained by flash pyrolysis for the production of amorphous silica and high quality activated carbon (2014) Bioresour. Technol., 170, pp. 132-137; Carpenter, D., Westover, T.L., Czernik, S., Jablonski, W., Biomass feedstocks for renewable fuel production: a review of the impacts of feedstock and pretreatment on the yield and product distribution of fast pyrolysis bio-oils and vapors (2014) Green Chem., 16, pp. 384-406; Oasmaa, A., Solantausta, Y., Arpiainen, V., Kuoppala, E., Sipilä, K., Fast pyrolysis bio-oils from wood and agricultural residues (2010) Energy Fuel, 24, pp. 1380-1388; Puy, N., Murillo, R., Navarro, M.V., López, J.M., Rieradevall, J., Fowler, G., Aranguren, I., Mastral, A.M., Valorisation of forestry waste by pyrolysis in an auger reactor (2011) Waste Manag., 31, pp. 1339-1349; Greenhalf, C.E., Nowakowski, D.J., Harms, A.B., Titiloye, J.O., Bridgwater, A.V., A comparative study of straw, perennial grasses and hardwoods in terms of fast pyrolysis products (2013) Fuel, 108, pp. 216-230; Graça, I., Lopes, J.M., Cerqueira, H.S., Ribeiro, M.F., Bio-oils upgrading for second generation biofuels (2013) Ind. Eng. Chem. Res., 52, pp. 275-287; Thilakaratne, R., Brown, T., Li, Y., Hu, G., Brown, R., Mild catalytic pyrolysis of biomass for production of transportation fuels: a techno-economic analysis (2014) Green Chem., 16, pp. 627-636; Lian, J., Chen, S., Zhou, S., Wang, Z., O'Fallon, J., Li, C.Z., Garcia-Perez, M., Separation, hydrolysis and fermentation of pyrolytic sugars to produce ethanol and lipids (2010) Bioresour. Technol., 101, pp. 9688-9699; Piskorz, J., Scott, D.S., Radlein, D., Composition of oils obtained by fast pyrolysis of different woods (1988) ACS Symp. Ser., pp. 167-178; Kim, J.S., Production, separation and applications of phenolic-rich bio-oil — a review (2015) Bioresour. Technol., 178, pp. 90-98; Johansson, A.-C., Wiinikka, H., Sandström, L., Marklund, M., Öhrman, O.G.W., Narvesjö, J., Characterization of pyrolysis products produced from different Nordic biomass types in a cyclone pilot plant (2016) Fuel Process. Technol., 146, pp. 9-19; Lédé, J., The cyclone: a multifunctional reactor for the fast pyrolysis of biomass (2000) Ind. Eng. Chem. Res., 39, pp. 893-903; Oasmaa, A., Peacocke, C., Properties and Fuel Use of Biomass-derived Fast Pyrolysis Liquids (2010), http://www.vtt.fi/Documents/P731.pdf, VTT Publications, VTTRaveendran, K., Ganesh, A., Khilar, K.C., Influence of mineral matter on biomass pyrolysis characteristics (1995) Fuel, 74, pp. 1812-1822; Demirbas, A., Effects of temperature and particle size on bio-char yield from pyrolysis of agricultural residues (2004) J. Anal. Appl. Pyrolysis, 72, pp. 243-248; Yang, H., Yan, R., Chen, H., Lee, D.H., Zheng, C., Characteristics of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin pyrolysis (2007) Fuel, 86, pp. 1781-1788; Couhert, C., Commandre, J.-M., Salvador, S., Is it possible to predict gas yields of any biomass after rapid pyrolysis at high temperature from its composition in cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin? (2009) Fuel, 88, pp. 408-417; Amutio, M., Lopez, G., Artetxe, M., Elordi, G., Olazar, M., Bilbao, J., Influence of temperature on biomass pyrolysis in a conical spouted bed reactor (2012) Resour. Conserv. Recycl., 59, pp. 23-31; Collard, F.-X., Blin, J., A review on pyrolysis of biomass constituents: mechanisms and composition of the products obtained from the conversion of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin (2014) Renew. Sust. Energ. Rev., 38, pp. 594-608; Aylott, M.J., Casella, E., Tubby, I., Street, N.R., Smith, P., Taylor, G., Yield and spatial supply of bioenergy poplar and willow short-rotation coppice in the UK (2008) New Phytol., 178, pp. 358-370; Lord, R.A., Reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea) outperforms Miscanthus or willow on marginal soils, brownfield and non-agricultural sites for local, sustainable energy crop production (2015) Biomass Bioenergy, 78, pp. 110-125; Johansson, J., Lundqvist, U., Estimating Swedish biomass energy supply (1999) Biomass Bioenergy, 17, pp. 85-93; Rosenqvist, H., Berndes, G., Börjesson, P., The prospects of cost reductions in willow production in Sweden (2013) Biomass Bioenergy, 48, pp. 139-147

Available from: 2016-12-19 Created: 2016-12-19 Last updated: 2019-08-21Bibliographically approved
Andersson, J., Lundgren, J. & Marklund, M. (2014). Methanol production via pressurized entrained flow biomass gasification: Techno-economic comparison of integrated vs. stand-alone production (ed.). Biomass and Bioenergy, 64, 256-268
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Methanol production via pressurized entrained flow biomass gasification: Techno-economic comparison of integrated vs. stand-alone production
2014 (English)In: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, E-ISSN 1873-2909, Vol. 64, p. 256-268Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The main objective with this work was to investigate techno-economically the opportunity for integrated gasification-based biomass-to-methanol production in an existing chemical pulp and paper mill. Three different system configurations using the pressurized entrained flow biomass gasification (PEBG) technology were studied, one stand-alone plant, one where the bark boiler in the mill was replaced by a PEBG unit and one with a co-integration of a black liquor gasifier operated in parallel with a PEBG unit. The cases were analysed in terms of overall energy efficiency (calculated as electricity-equivalents) and process economics. The economics was assessed under the current as well as possible future energy market conditions. An economic policy support was found to be necessary to make the methanol production competitive under all market scenarios. In a future energy market, integrating a PEBG unit to replace the bark boiler was the most beneficial case from an economic point of view. In this case the methanol production cost was reduced in the range of 11-18 Euro per MWh compared to the stand-alone case. The overall plant efficiency increased approximately 7%-units compared to the original operation of the mill and the non-integrated stand-alone case. In the case with co-integration of the two parallel gasifiers, an equal increase of the system efficiency was achieved, but the economic benefit was not as apparent. Under similar conditions as the current market and when methanol was sold to replace fossil gasoline, co-integration of the two parallel gasifiers was the best alternative based on received IRR. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

Keywords
Biomass, Gasification, Methanol, Process integration, Pulp and paper mill, Energiteknik
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-6942 (URN)10.1016/j.biombioe.2014.03.063 (DOI)2-s2.0-84899929098 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08 Last updated: 2018-08-22Bibliographically approved
Weiland, F., Hedman, H., Marklund, M., Wiinikka, H., Öhrman, O. .. .. & Gebart, R. (2013). Pressurized oxygen blown entrained-flow gasification of wood powder (ed.). Energy & Fuels, 27(2), 932-941
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pressurized oxygen blown entrained-flow gasification of wood powder
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2013 (English)In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 932-941Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the present study, an oxygen blown pilot scale pressurized entrained-flow biomass gasification plant (PEBG, 1 MWth) was designed, constructed, and operated. This Article provides a detailed description of the pilot plant and results from gasification experiments with stem wood biomass made from pine and spruce. The focus was to evaluate the performance of the gasifier with respect to syngas quality and mass and energy balance. The gasifier was operated at an elevated pressure of 2 bar(a) and at an oxygen equivalence ratio (λ) between 0.43 and 0.50. The resulting process temperatures in the hot part of the gasifier were in the range of 1100-1300 °C during the experiments. As expected, a higher λ results in a higher process temperature. The syngas concentrations (dry and N 2 free) during the experiments were 25-28 mol % for H2, 47-49 mol % for CO, 20-24 mol % for CO2, and 1-2 mol % for CH 4. The dry syngas N2 content was varied between 18 and 25 mol % depending on the operating conditions of the gasifier. The syngas H 2/CO ratio was 0.54-0.57. The gasifier cold gas efficiency (CGE) was approximately 70% for the experimental campaigns performed in this study. The synthesis gas produced by the PEBG has potential for further upgrading to renewable products, for example, chemicals or biofuels, because the performance of the gasifier is close to that of other relevant gasifiers. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

Keywords
Energiteknik
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-6954 (URN)10.1021/ef301803s (DOI)2-s2.0-84874187812 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Wiinikka, H., Carlsson, P., Marklund, M., Grönberg, C., Pettersson, E., Lidman, M. & Gebart, R. (2012). Experimental investigation of an industrial scale black liquor gasifier: Part 2: Influence of quench operation on product gas composition (ed.). Fuel, 93, 117-129
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimental investigation of an industrial scale black liquor gasifier: Part 2: Influence of quench operation on product gas composition
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2012 (English)In: Fuel, Vol. 93, p. 117-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Energiteknik
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-6956 (URN)
Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08 Last updated: 2019-06-24Bibliographically approved
Weiland, F., Wiinikka, H., Hedman, H., Marklund, M. & Gebart, R. (2012). Pressurized entrained flow gasification of biomass powder: Initial results from pilot plant experiments. In: The 4th Nordic Wood Biorefinery Conference: . Paper presented at The 4th Nordic Wood Biorefinery Conference. 23 October through 25 October, 2012. Helsinki, Finland..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pressurized entrained flow gasification of biomass powder: Initial results from pilot plant experiments
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2012 (English)In: The 4th Nordic Wood Biorefinery Conference, 2012Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-218 (URN)
Conference
The 4th Nordic Wood Biorefinery Conference. 23 October through 25 October, 2012. Helsinki, Finland.
Available from: 2016-06-13 Created: 2016-06-13 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Gullberg, M. & Marklund, M. (2012). Spray characterization of twin fluid external mix atomization of pyrolysis oil. (ed.). Atomization and Sprays, 22, 897-919
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spray characterization of twin fluid external mix atomization of pyrolysis oil.
2012 (English)In: Atomization and Sprays, Vol. 22, p. 897-919Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Energiteknik
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-6957 (URN)
Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08 Last updated: 2018-08-22Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4286-200x

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