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Shahbazi, S., Kurdve, M., Zackrisson, M., Jönsson, C. & Kristinsdortter, A. R. (2019). Comparison of Four Environmental Assessment Tools in Swedish Manufacturing: A Case Study. Sustainability, 11(7), Article ID 2173.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of Four Environmental Assessment Tools in Swedish Manufacturing: A Case Study
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2019 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 2173Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To achieve sustainable development goals, it is essential to include the industrial system. There are sufficient numbers of tools and methods for measuring, assessing and improving the quality, productivity and efficiency of production, but the number of tools and methods for environmental initiatives on the shop floor is rather low. Incorporating environmental considerations into production and performance management systems still generally involves a top-down approach aggregated for an entire manufacturing plant. Green lean studies have been attempting to fill this gap to some extent, but the lack of detailed methodologies and practical tools for environmental manufacturing improvement on the shop floor is still evident. This paper reports on the application of four environmental assessment tools commonly used among Swedish manufacturing companies—Green Performance Map (GPM), Environmental Value Stream Mapping (EVSM), Waste Flow Mapping (WFM), and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)—to help practitioners and scholars to understand the different features of each tool, so in turn the right tool(s) can be selected according to particular questions and the industrial settings. Because there are some overlap and differences between the tools and a given tool may be more appropriate to a situation depending on the question posed, a combination of tools is suggested to embrace different types of data collection and analysis to include different environmental impacts for better prioritization and decision-making.

Keywords
sustainable manufacturing; environmental assessment tool; green lean
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-38810 (URN)10.3390/su11072173 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-05-17 Created: 2019-05-17 Last updated: 2019-06-27
Shahbazi, S., Kurdve, M., Zackrisson, M., Jönsson, C. & Kristinsdottir, A. R. (2019). Comparison of four environmental assessment tools in Swedish manufacturing: A case study. Sustainability, 11(7), Article ID 2173.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of four environmental assessment tools in Swedish manufacturing: A case study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 2173Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To achieve sustainable development goals, it is essential to include the industrial system. There are sufficient numbers of tools and methods for measuring, assessing and improving the quality, productivity and efficiency of production, but the number of tools and methods for environmental initiatives on the shop floor is rather low. Incorporating environmental considerations into production and performance management systems still generally involves a top-down approach aggregated for an entire manufacturing plant. Green lean studies have been attempting to fill this gap to some extent, but the lack of detailed methodologies and practical tools for environmental manufacturing improvement on the shop floor is still evident. This paper reports on the application of four environmental assessment tools commonly used among Swedish manufacturing companies-Green Performance Map (GPM), Environmental Value Stream Mapping (EVSM), Waste Flow Mapping (WFM), and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)-to help practitioners and scholars to understand the different features of each tool, so in turn the right tool(s) can be selected according to particular questions and the industrial settings. Because there are some overlap and differences between the tools and a given tool may be more appropriate to a situation depending on the question posed, a combination of tools is suggested to embrace different types of data collection and analysis to include different environmental impacts for better prioritization and decision-making.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2019
Keywords
Environmental assessment tool, Green lean, Sustainable manufacturing
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-39675 (URN)10.3390/su10022173 (DOI)2-s2.0-85069754919 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-07 Created: 2019-08-07 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
Landström, A., Almström, P., Winroth, M., Andersson, C., Ericson Öberg, A., Kurdve, M., . . . Zackrisson, M. (2018). A life cycle approach to business performance measurement systems. Procedia Manufacturing, 25, 126-133
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A life cycle approach to business performance measurement systems
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2018 (English)In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 25, p. 126-133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Virtually every company has implemented a Business Performance Measurement System (BPMS) with the purpose of monitoring production and business performance and to execute the corporate strategy at all levels in a company. The purpose of this article is to shed light on common pitfalls related to the practical use of BPMS and further to present a life cycle model with the purpose of introducing structured approach to avoiding the pitfalls. The article contributes to further development of the BPMS life cycle concept and practical examples of how it can be used.

Keywords
Business performance measurement systems, Performance indicators, KPI-life cycle
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-35397 (URN)10.1016/j.promfg.2018.06.066 (DOI)
Note

Proceedings of the 8th Swedish Production Symposium (SPS 2018)

Available from: 2018-10-16 Created: 2018-10-16 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Kurdve, M., van Loon, P. & Johansson, M. (2018). Cost and value drivers in circular material flow logistics. In: : . Paper presented at 5th International EurOMA Sustainable Operations and Supply Chains Forum. March 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cost and value drivers in circular material flow logistics
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This case study paper presents system costs and effect on costs due to variation inmanufacturing performance in recycling of manufacturing generated waste. One caseconcern metal, manufacturing waste and the other plastic assembly process waste. Thereexist potentials for improvements in logistics and operation planning which could beaided by sharing production performance information. There are also potentials toincrease value of the recycling material.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-33864 (URN)
Conference
5th International EurOMA Sustainable Operations and Supply Chains Forum. March 2018
Available from: 2018-05-18 Created: 2018-05-18 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Kurdve, M., Hildenbrand, J. & Jönsson, C. (2018). Design for green lean building module production - Case study. Procedia Manufacturing, 25, 594-601
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design for green lean building module production - Case study
2018 (English)In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 25, p. 594-601Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

With an increasing societal need for temporary buildings, while construction industry faces resource and time efficiency challenges, factory assembly of modular buildings can be a solution. This case study at a start-up company uses experiences from assembly system design and eco-design literature to propose green lean design principles to be used in the design and development of building modules and their assembly stations. The eco-design strategy wheel is used as a basis and adapted for the assessment of green and lean building manufacturing.

Keywords
modular building production, green lean, eco-design
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-35399 (URN)10.1016/j.promfg.2018.06.096 (DOI)
Note

Proceedings of the 8th Swedish Production Symposium (SPS 2018)

Available from: 2018-10-16 Created: 2018-10-16 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Kurdve, M., Jönsson, C. & Granzell, A.-S. (2018). Development of the urban and industrial symbiosis in western Mälardalen. Procedia CIRP, 73, 96-101
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of the urban and industrial symbiosis in western Mälardalen
2018 (English)In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 73, p. 96-101Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

From a product service systems business model development perspective, this paper presents a case study of Västra Mälardalens industrial symbiosis, its maturity level and potentials for further development. The status and potentials of the symbiosis network, based on a survey, interviews and workshops, together with background statistics, is used to evaluate the potential improvement areas and suggest future research. The study contributes with application of evaluation models and confirms earlier research and in addition suggests future research in the field. The Symbiosis network has potential to be acting as innovation catalyst supporting companies to go beyond core business development.

Keywords
Industrial symbiosis, Product service systems, Sustainable industrial development, Regional innovation networks
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-35400 (URN)10.1016/j.procir.2018.03.321 (DOI)2-s2.0-85054470134 (Scopus ID)
Note

10th CIRP Conference on Industrial Product-Service Systems, IPS2 2018, 29-31 May 2018, Linköping, Sweden

Available from: 2018-10-16 Created: 2018-10-16 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Kurdve, M. (2018). Digital assembly instruction system design with green lean perspective-Case study from building module industry. Paper presented at 51st CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems, CIRP CMS 2018, 16 May 2018 through 18 May 2018. Procedia CIRP, 72, 762-767
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital assembly instruction system design with green lean perspective-Case study from building module industry
2018 (English)In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 72, p. 762-767Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Manual "easy jobs" need to be efficient, standardised and quality assured to remain competitive against automated production. Digitalised work instructions offer an opportunity to support standardisation and quality assurance for manual work tasks in industry. Inspired by axiomatic design this study aims at selecting design of lean methods and equipment for digital assembly instructions and standardised work. Literature regarding standardised work and green lean production system is applied in a case study. Interviews, observations and green lean equipment design methods are used to conclude system requirements of a digital work instruction-system designed for assembly of modular buildings at Husmuttern AB. © 2018 The Authors.

Keywords
Assembly, Axiomatic design, Digital instructions, Green Lean, Social sustainability, Architectural design, Modular construction, Quality assurance, Systems analysis, Automated productions, Lean production system, System requirements, Work instructions, E-learning
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-34544 (URN)10.1016/j.procir.2018.03.118 (DOI)2-s2.0-85049584915 (Scopus ID)
Conference
51st CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems, CIRP CMS 2018, 16 May 2018 through 18 May 2018
Available from: 2018-08-09 Created: 2018-08-09 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Birkie, S. E., Kurdve, M., Bellgran, M. & Korhonen, J. (2018). Implementation challenges affecting the environmental improvement performance in pharmaceutical production: Results of a green kaizen pilot. IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, 535, 58-66
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implementation challenges affecting the environmental improvement performance in pharmaceutical production: Results of a green kaizen pilot
2018 (English)In: IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, ISSN 1868-4238, Vol. 535, p. 58-66Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper reports on working findings in an action research-based project, implementing a green kaizen pilot in a European pharmaceutical manufacturing company. The aim of the study is to investigate how continuous improvement initiatives with focus on environment originally developed for the automotive manufacturing industry could apply to the pharmaceutical industry. It also aspires to understand the enabling and hindering issues are for such implementation. There are considerable similarities of implementing lean in general in the two sectors, however, some key differences and challenges were apparent when implementing this specific green kaizen method called Green Performance Map. An implication for pharma practitioners implementing the green kaizen method concerns how to improve working procedures and production equipment to become more environmentally friendly amid high regulatory demands on process quality. Implementation challenges are discussed in terms of fidelity, locus and extensiveness of lean practices implementation. © 2018, IFIP International Federation for Information Processing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer New York LLC, 2018
Keywords
Industrial management; Industrial research; Manufacture, Automotive manufacturing industries; Continuous improvements; Environmental improvements; Performance maps; Pharmaceutical industry; Pharmaceutical manufacturing; Pharmaceutical production; Sustainable production, Sustainable development
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-35398 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-99704-9_8 (DOI)2-s2.0-85053240209 (Scopus ID)
Note

Conference of IFIP WG 5.7 International Conference on Advances in Production Management Systems, APMS 2018 ; Conference Date: 26 August 2018 Through 30 August 2018; Conference Code:217649

Available from: 2018-10-16 Created: 2018-10-16 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Sjögren, P., Fagerström, B., Kurdve, M. & Callavik, M. (2018). Managing emergent changes: Ad hoc teams praxis and practices. International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, 11(4), 1086-1104
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing emergent changes: Ad hoc teams praxis and practices
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 1086-1104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore how emergent changes are handled in research and development (R&D) projects. R&D projects business potential lies in their exploration of the unknown; conversely, this makes them uncertain endeavours, prone to emergent changes. Design/methodology/approach: Uses a single-case-study design, based on a projects-as-practice perspective and a soft systems methodology (SSM) analysis, to map how ad hoc R&D teams handle emergent changes, specifically the solution identification and assessment phase and the implementation plan. An R&D project in the power industry, involving over 250 engineers, was analysed. Findings: This paper shows how emergent changes are handled differently from initiated changes during the decision-making phase. The system analysis shows that the most critical factors for managing these changes are: collective reflection between project parties; and including experienced engineers in implementation-plan reviews. Practical implications: The results are of relevance both to R&D managers aiming to improve team performance and to general project management. Informal notions of emergent changes can be formalised in the change request process. Weaknesses in the project team’s organisation are highlighted, and details of how of how to mitigate these are provided. Originality/value: Combines engineering-design and project-management research on emergent changes, adding to the former regarding people–organisational and strategic issues. Furthers understanding of the projects-as-practice approach and emergent change (deviations) handling by ad hoc teams in a project environment. SSM has not previously been used to explore aspects of projects-as-practice, and this is a novel way of adding to the body of knowledge on project praxis and practise.

Keywords
Project management, Research and development, Emergent change, Soft systems methodology, Ad hoc teams
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-34234 (URN)10.1108/IJMPB-12-2017-0163 (DOI)2-s2.0-85049525820 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-18 Created: 2018-07-18 Last updated: 2018-12-12Bibliographically approved
Shahbazi, S., Jönsson, C., Wiktorsson, M., Kurdve, M. & Bjelkemyr, M. (2018). Material efficiency measurements in manufacturing: Swedish case studies. Journal of Cleaner Production, 181, 17-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Material efficiency measurements in manufacturing: Swedish case studies
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 181, p. 17-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A major factor in the continued deterioration of the global environment is unsustainable management of resources that includes the type and quantity of resources consumed and manufactured as well as the subsequent generation and treatment of wasted materials. Improved material efficiency (ME) in manufacturing is key to reducing resource consumption levels and improving waste management initiatives. However, ME must be measured, and related goals must be broken down into performance indicators for manufacturing companies. This paper aims to improve ME in manufacturing using a structured model for ME performance measurements. We present a set of ME key performance indicators (ME-KPIs) at the individual company and lower operational levels based on empirical studies and a structured literature review. Our empirical findings are based on data collected on the performance indicators and material and waste flows of nine manufacturing companies located in Sweden. The proposed model categorizes ME-KPIs into the following categories: productive input materials, auxiliary input materials, output products, and residual output materials. These categories must be measured equally to facilitate the measurement, assessment, improvement and reporting of material consumption and waste generation in a manufacturing context. Required qualities for ME-KPI suggested in literature are also discussed, and missing indicators are identified. Most of the identified ME-KPIs measure quality- and cost-related factors, while end-of-life scenarios, waste segregation and the environmental effects of waste generation and material consumption are not equally measured. Additionally, ME-KPIs must also be connected to pre-determined goals and that defining or revising ME-KPIs requires communication with various external and internal actors to increase employees’ awareness and engagement.

Keywords
Key performance indicators, Material efficiency, Sustainable production, Benchmarking, Efficiency, Manufacture, Sustainable development, Manufacturing companies, Material consumption, Performance indicators, Performance measurements, Resource consumption, Waste management
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-33400 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.01.215 (DOI)2-s2.0-85042354105 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding details: Knowledge Foundation; Funding text: The studies are connected to projects Innofacture, CiMMRec and SuRE BPMS. The authors acknowledge the funding received for these projects from the Swedish Knowledge Foundation, Mistra Closing the loop II and Vinnova. The research was conducted within the contexts of the XPRES initiative involving MDH and Swerea, as well as Chalmers Advanced Area of Production.

Available from: 2018-03-08 Created: 2018-03-08 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9068-3527

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