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Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Akbari, S., Johansson, J., Johansson, E., Tönnäng, L. & Hosseini, S. (2022). Large-Scale Robot-Based Polymer and Composite Additive Manufacturing: Failure Modes and Thermal Simulation. Polymers, 14(9), Article ID 1731.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Large-Scale Robot-Based Polymer and Composite Additive Manufacturing: Failure Modes and Thermal Simulation
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2022 (English)In: Polymers, E-ISSN 2073-4360, Vol. 14, no 9, article id 1731Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Additive manufacturing (AM) of large-scale polymer and composite parts using robotic arms integrated with extruders has received significant attention in recent years. Despite the contributions of great technical progress and material development towards optimizing this manufacturing method, different failure modes observed in the final printed products have hindered its application in producing large engineering structures used in aerospace and automotive industries. We report failure modes in a variety of printed polymer and composite parts, including fuel tanks and car bumpers. Delamination and warpage observed in these parts originate mostly from thermal gradients and residual stresses accumulated during material deposition and cooling. Because printing large structures requires expensive resources, process simulation to recognize the possible failure modes can significantly lower the manufacturing cost. In this regard, accurate prediction of temperature distribution using thermal simulations is the first step. Finite element analysis (FEA) was used for process simulation of large-scale robotic AM. The important steps of the simulation are presented, and the challenges related to the modeling are recognized and discussed in detail. The numerical results showed reasonable agreement with the temperature data measured by an infrared camera. While in small-scale extrusion AM, the cooling time to the glassy state is less than 1 s, in large-scale AM, the cooling time is around two orders of magnitudes longer. © 2022 by the authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
Failure modes, Large-scale additive manufacturing, Polymers and composites, Thermal simulation, Warpage and delamination, 3D printers, Additives, Automotive industry, Cooling, Failure (mechanical), Robotics, Composite parts, Cooling time, Large-scales, Polymer additive, Polymer and composite, Process simulations, Thermal simulations, Warpages
National Category
Applied Mechanics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-59226 (URN)10.3390/polym14091731 (DOI)2-s2.0-85129060281 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding details: VINNOVA, 2018-04342; Funding text 1: Acknowledgments: This project was supported by RISE IVF and Vinnova (Project Number 2018-04342). The technical support for ANSYS from EDR&MEDESO is also appreciated.

Available from: 2022-06-02 Created: 2022-06-02 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Walander, M., Nygren, A., Sjöblom, J., Johansson, E., Creaser, D., Edvardsson, J., . . . Lundberg, B. (2021). Use of 3D-printed mixers in laboratory reactor design for modelling of heterogeneous catalytic converters. Chemical Engineering and Processing, 164, Article ID 108325.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Use of 3D-printed mixers in laboratory reactor design for modelling of heterogeneous catalytic converters
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2021 (English)In: Chemical Engineering and Processing, ISSN 0255-2701, E-ISSN 1873-3204, Vol. 164, article id 108325Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A method for identifying radial concentration maldistribution in synthetic catalyst activity test (SCAT) benches, is presented, where spatially resolved concentration measurements are not available. The developed methodology was successfully tested for an injection-based SCAT. To resolve the radial concentration maldistribution a static mixer was designed, 3D-printed and inserted upstream the test sample. The methodology could also prove the effectiveness of the mixer, which did not only resolve the concentration maldistribution but also avoided causing reaction disturbances. The resulting increased axial dispersion from the turbulence created by the static mixer was evaluated using a 3D CFD model in Ansys Fluent 19. The axial dispersion of the injection-based SCAT bench was compared to a premixed SCAT bench through classical Aris-Taylor calculations. The results from the axial dispersion calculations show that the injection-based design with the use of a static mixer is far superior to the premixed design – both with regards to pulse broadening but also time delay. This is highly desirable for modelling studies towards zero emission exhaust aftertreatment. © 2021 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2021
Keywords
3D-printing, Axial dispersion, Radial mixing, Reactor design, Static mixer, Step experiment
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-52829 (URN)10.1016/j.cep.2021.108325 (DOI)2-s2.0-85103133485 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Fellowships Fund Incorporated, FFI, 42814-1; Funding details: Chalmers Tekniska Högskola; Funding details: Energimyndigheten; Funding text 1: All project members, Patrik Wåhlin at Chalmers University of Technology as well as the technical staff at Johnson Matthey are deeply acknowledged for their help with performing and analyzing the experiments. Huge thanks to RISE Sweden for printing and providing the project with the finalized mixer. The Swedish Energy Agency (FFI Project 42814-1) is acknowledged for financial support.; Funding text 2: All project members, Patrik W?hlin at Chalmers University of Technology as well as the technical staff at Johnson Matthey are deeply acknowledged for their help with performing and analyzing the experiments. Huge thanks to RISE Sweden for printing and providing the project with the finalized mixer. The Swedish Energy Agency (FFI Project 42814-1) is acknowledged for financial support.

Available from: 2021-04-26 Created: 2021-04-26 Last updated: 2021-06-16Bibliographically approved
Bonham, E., McMaster, K., Thomson, E., Panarotto, M., Müller, J., Isaksson, O. & Johansson, E. (2020). Designing and integrating a digital thread system for customized additive manufacturing in multi-partner kayak production. Systems, 8(4), Article ID 43.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing and integrating a digital thread system for customized additive manufacturing in multi-partner kayak production
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2020 (English)In: Systems, ISSN 2079-8954, Vol. 8, no 4, article id 43Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Additive manufacturing (AM) opens the vision of decentralised and individualised manufacturing, as a tailored product can be manufactured in proximity to the customers with minimal physical infrastructure required. Consequently, the digital infrastructure and systems solution becomes substantially more complex. There is always a need to design the entire digital system so that different partners (or stakeholders) access correct and relevant information and even support design iterations despite the heterogenous digital environments involved. This paper describes how the design and integration of a digital thread for AM can be approached. A system supporting a digital thread for AM kayak production has been designed and integrated in collaboration with a kayak manufacturer and a professional collaborative product lifecycle management (PLM) software and service provider. From the demonstrated system functionality, three key lessons learnt are clarified: (1) The need for developing a process model of the physical and digital flow in the early stages, (2) the separation between the data to be shared and the processing of data to perform each parties’ task, and (3) the development of an ad-hoc digital application for the involvement of new stakeholders in the AM digital flow, such as final users. The application of the digital thread system was demonstrated through a test of the overall concept by manufacturing a functional and individually customised kayak, printed remotely using AM (composed of a biocomposite containing 20% wood-based fibre). © 2020 by the authors. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2020
Keywords
Additive manufacturing, Design automation, Digital thread
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-51271 (URN)10.3390/systems8040043 (DOI)2-s2.0-85097811306 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: 2017-04776; Funding details: VINNOVA; Funding text 1: Funding: This research was funded by VINNOVA, the Swedish Energy Agency, and Formas through the strategic innovation program Produktion2030, Reference number 2017-04776. The research was performed in the DISAM project (Digitalization of Supply Chain in Swedish Additive Manufacturing).

Available from: 2021-01-12 Created: 2021-01-12 Last updated: 2021-01-12Bibliographically approved
Adolfsson, E., Lyckfeldt, O. & Johansson, E. (2016). Visible-Light Curable Ceramic Suspensions for Additive Manufacturing of Dense Ceramic Parts. In: : . Paper presented at 6th International Congress on Ceramics (ICC6), August 21-25, 2016, Dresden, Germany.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Visible-Light Curable Ceramic Suspensions for Additive Manufacturing of Dense Ceramic Parts
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-30218 (URN)
Conference
6th International Congress on Ceramics (ICC6), August 21-25, 2016, Dresden, Germany
Available from: 2017-08-07 Created: 2017-08-07 Last updated: 2019-06-26Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4163-2464

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