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Warneryd, M., Håkansson, M. & Karltorp, K. (2020). Unpacking the complexity of community microgrids: A review of institutions’ roles for development of microgrids. Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, 121, Article ID 109690.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unpacking the complexity of community microgrids: A review of institutions’ roles for development of microgrids
2020 (English)In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 121, article id 109690Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Community microgrids implemented in existing electricity grids can meet both development targets set out in the Paris agreement: 1. mitigate greenhouse gas emissions through increased implementation of renewable energy sources, and 2. to adapt to climate related disturbances and risk of catastrophes. Community microgrids are, however, complex to implement and institutional change is needed to reach their full potential. The purpose of this article is to review existing literature and analyze institutional developments influencing the growth of community microgrids. The literature describes a concentration of microgrid activities in specific regions: USA, EU, Asia and Australia. Varying reasons for implementing community microgrids were found in the different regions but similar institutional developments occurred, albeit with differing emphasis due to contextual specificities. Formal directions do however influence informal institutions even though their aims differ. Power utilities stand out as a critical actor and both formal and informal institutions put pressure on utilities to update their traditional business models. This article illustrates how informal and formal institutions play a significant role in the growth of community microgrids in existing electricity grids and provide interesting examples which can be utilized by policymakers. Microgrid development is still in a formative phase and further institutional change in the form of updated regulations is needed. © 2020 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2020
Keywords
Community energy, Community microgrid, Energy system transformation, Microgrid, Socio-technical change, Sustainability transition, Gas emissions, Greenhouse gases, Renewable energy resources, Micro grid, Socio-technical changes, Electric power transmission networks
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-43357 (URN)10.1016/j.rser.2019.109690 (DOI)2-s2.0-85077921856 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, NEDO; Funding details: Energimyndigheten; Funding details: Ministry of National Development - Singapore, MND; Funding details: Ministry of the Environment and Water Resources - Singapore, MEWR; Funding details: Samsung; Funding details: Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology, Australian Research Council, PEB; Funding details: National Development and Reform Commission, NDRC; Funding details: Curtin University of Technology; Funding details: Neelan Tiruchelvam Trust, NTT; Funding details: Chinese Academy of Sciences, CAS; Funding details: Ministry of Economic Affairs, MOEA; Funding details: City, University of London, City; Funding details: Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy, MOTIE; Funding details: European Commission, EU; Funding text 1: Japan has been the early leader in MG research in Asia, but in recent years South Korea, Singapore and China have been increasingly expanding their MG development [ 148 ]. In Japan, the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) is a key actor which has been funding several demonstration projects including the Sendai MG. This was created from a network involving NEDO as funding agency in collaboration with research actors and the City of Sendai local government which were the driving actors in developing and maintaining the MG [ 148 ]. This local city support proved particularly valuable in helping to ‘ sidestep [utility] regulation ’ [ 148 ]. Both south Korea and Taiwan has a history of government-business driven initiatives. In recent years, these collaborations between private actors and government have been promoting smart MGs, viewing this as a future competitive positioning of domestic actors. Important actors include Ministry for Trade, Industry and Energy (MOTIE) in Korea and Ministry of Economic Affairs (MOEA) in Taiwan. Thus, private actors in these countries, are connected with the government and shaped by strategic initiatives and governmental visions [ 150 ]. Numerous state actors in China influence MG development, see Refs. [ 146 , 148 ] and Appendix D for specific examples. In general, most MG initiatives in China are state driven suggesting for instance that MGs are able to enhance grid capacity in already densely populated and yet rapidly growing cities which provides one direction for actors in the domain. Formal, top-down approval of MGs to help integrate renewable energy in dense cities has potential to stimulate fast development. In Singapore, the government through different ministries has played an important role in formulating strategies and goals for more sustainable development, including clean energy [ 149 ]. Among others, it resulted in the Singapore Sustainable Development Blueprint released in 2009, which outlines targets for the next 10–20 years. The Singapore Agency for Science, Technology, and Research (A*STAR) has been involved in MG testing [ 149 ]. 5.4.2; Funding text 2: The authors would like to thank the Swedish Energy Agency for funding the study within the research project ‘Solar-based microgrids-a potential for the future? [Project no. 43272-1 ]. We would also like to thank the two anonymous reviewers which greatly contributed to improving earlier versions of this article. We are also grateful to Ewa Wäckelgård at Dalarna University for commenting on earlier versions of the article. Appendix A; Funding text 3: Examples of state and federal actor Examples of technology providers Examples of communities • New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization NEDO (Japan) • Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy MOTIE (Korea) • Ministry of Economic Affairs MOEA (Taiwan) • National Energy Administration NEA (China) • National Development Reform Commission (NDRC) (China) • Ministry of the Environment and Water Resources MEWR (Singapore) • Ministry for National Development (MND) (Singapore) • Ministry of Trade and Industry (Singapore) • Renewable energy Agency ARENA (Australia) • Department of Resources, Energy and Tourism (DRET) (Australia) • Council of Australian Governments Energy Council COAGEC (Australia) • Australian Energy Market Operator AEMO (Australia) • Samsung • LG • Tesla • City of Sendai • White Gum Valley Examples of local utilities Examples of research actors Examples of NGOs • Synergy (Australia) • Chinese academy of sciences (China) • Curtin University (Australia) • NTT Facilities Research Institute (Japan) • Tohoku Fukushi University • Clean Energy Council (Australia) Sources: [1–7] [1] Romankiewicz J, Marnay C, Zhou N, Qu M. Lessons from international experience for China's microgrid demonstration program. Energy Policy. 2014; 67:198–208. [2] Chan D, Cameron M, Yoon Y. Implementationof micro energy grid: A case study of a sustainable community in China. Energy and Buildings. 2017; 139:719–31. [3] Feng W, Jin M, Liu X, Bao Y, Marnay C, Yao C, et al. A review of microgrid development in the United States–A decade of progress on policies, demonstrations, controls, and software tools. Applied energy. 2018; 228:1656–68. [4] Akizu O, Bueno G, Barcena I, Kurt E, Topaloğlu N, Lopez-Guede J. Contributions of Bottom-Up Energy Transitions in Germany: A Case Study Analysis. Energies. 2018; 11:849. [5] Nohrstedt L. Skånsk by blir först med mikronät. Ny Teknik; 2017. [6] MGK E. Homepage. Microgrid knowledge 2019. [7] Green J, Newman P. Planning and Governance for Decentralized Energy Assets in Medium-Density Housing: The WGV Gen Y Case Study. Urban Policy and Research. 2018; 36:201–14. Appendix E; Funding text 4: Microgrid related projects funded by the European Commission

Available from: 2020-01-30 Created: 2020-01-30 Last updated: 2020-01-30Bibliographically approved
Håkansson, M., Kovacs, P. & Thuvander, L. (2019). SOL:AR: Beställarstöd för Solenergiinvesteringar genom avancerad visualisering.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>SOL:AR: Beställarstöd för Solenergiinvesteringar genom avancerad visualisering
2019 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Utvecklingen inom solenergi i Sverige har gått snabbt de senaste åren, men hittills harde flesta företag och privatpersoner satsat på att installera solceller på tak. En annanresurs som i dagsläget är relativt outnyttjad, men där vi ser både en möjlighet för ochen ökande trend av olika sollösningar, är fasader. I miljöer där man pga platsbrist intekan bygga nytt, kan ändå fasadytor på byggnader utnyttjas för en rad saker, bl a till attgenerera förnybar solel och/eller ge plats för skuggande solavskärmningar ochdärmed minskat kylbehov. I projektet SOL:AR har vi tittat på hur ett framtida digitaltvisualiseringsverktyg skulle kunna underlätta för beställare som funderar påsollösningar till fasad, där vi inkluderar såväl traditionella solceller sombyggnadsintegrerad solel (BIPV) och solavskärmningar. Skulle ett digitalt verktygkunna ge en snabb uppfattning om t ex lönsamhet på solceller eller solavskärmningarpå fasad, och hur dessa skulle se ut på en fastighet? Skulle detta vara till hjälp förbeställare som är nyfikna på och funderar på sollösningar? Ett långsiktigt syfte medprojektet är att stötta utvecklingen av fasader som resurs så att nya möjligheter för bl asolcellsinstallationer kan tas tillvara.Genom att intervjua tilltänkta målgrupper som fastighetsägare och andranyckelaktörer om deras behov och önskemål kring ett digitalt verktyg, kartlägga vilkatekniska möjligheter samt juridiska och organisatoriska frågeställningar som finns, såhar vi utforskat förutsättningarna för ett sådant verktyg. Vi har identifieratfastighetsägare som den primära målgruppen för verktyget och då framföralltmellanstora fastighetsägare med främst kommersiella fastigheter, men konstaterar attdet även hos bostadsrättsföreningar och i flerbostadshus finns ett växande intresse försollösningar. Sammanlagt har minst 30 personer från fastighetsbolag,branschorganisationer, solenergileverantörer, myndigheter ochsamhällsbyggnadskontor deltagit i våra intervjuer/workshopsaktiviteter och bidragitmed sina behov och tankar kring hur ett digitalt visualiseringsverktyg skulle kunnaskapa nytta i beställningsprocessen av solenergi/solavskärmningar på fasad.Resultatet från studiedeltagarna visar på att ett digitalt visualiseringsverktyg kan varaav värde för fastighetsägare om det kan väcka intresse för sollösningar tidigt i enombyggnad- eller renoveringsprocess; är lätt att använda för olika roller påfastighetsbolag inkl. hyresgäster och BRFer; kan ge en bild av hur en viss sollösningskulle se ut samt en uppskattning av ekonomi och miljönytta (snarare än exaktaberäkningar); kan fungera som ett kommunikationsstöd för fastighetsägare i dialogenmed t ex hyresgäster; kan användas både ”ute i fält” vid en fastighet och på kontoret;ägs av en opartisk aktör och är gratis för fastighetsägaren att använda.Dessa insikter, tillsammans med kartläggningen av tekniska och juridiska frågor, harsammanställts i en kravspecifikation för ett framtida verktyg. Avslutningsvisgenomförde vi en workshop med inbjudna aktörer från visualiserings- ochsolavskärmningsbranschen för att säkra kravspecifikations relevans och identifieraytterligare viktiga frågor inför en framtida utvecklingsfas. Utmaningar framöverinkluderar att hitta en neutral ägare/förvaltare till verktyget, identifiera en rimligfinansieringsmodell, samt att implementera och testa verktyget i ett antal steg i väntanpå nödvändiga framsteg inom augmented reality-området och 3D-data.

Abstract [en]

The solar energy business has developed rapidly in Sweden in recent years, but so farmost companies and individuals have chosen to install solar cells on roofs. Anotherrelatively unexplored resource that we argue offer potential and where we see anemerging trend for various solar solutions, is building facades. In contexts where lackof space prevents building new or standalone solar energy installments, facades canstill be used for a range of purposes, e.g., generating renewable solar power and/orprovide space for shading devices and thereby reduced demand for cooling. In theSOL:AR project we have investigated how a future digital visualization tool could makeit easier for clients who are considering solar solutions, including categories ofproducts like solar cells, building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) and solar shading.How could a digital tool give a quick insight into e.g., the profitability of solar cells or asolar shading solution on a certain façade, and how would these look aesthetically? Along term aim in the project is to stimulate the development of facades as a resourcethat opens for new opportunities for solar solutions.Through interviewing potential target groups like property owners and other keyactors about their needs and requests regarding a digital tool, mapping out technicalpossibilities as well as legal and organizational aspects, we have investigated theprerequisites for such a tool. We have identified property owners as our primary targetgroup, and in particular medium-sized property owners with commercial buildings,although there seems to be an increasing interest in solar solutions also in tenantowners’ associations and apartment buildings. In total, at least 30 people fromproperty companies, trade organizations, solar energy companies, governmentalagencies, and urban planning offices have participated in our interviews andworkshops respectively and contributed their thoughts and needs about how a digitalvisualization tool could create value in the procurement of solar solutions for facades.The results from the study suggest that a digital visualization tool could create valuefor property owners if it triggers the interest for solar solutions early in a renovation-/rebuilding process; is easy to use for people regardless of role at the propertycompany or tenant owners’ association; can provide an idea of how a certain solarsolution would look along with an estimation of economic and environmental benefits(rather than exact calculations); can support the communication about solar solutionsbetween property owners and tenants; can be used “in the field” at a certain buildingas well as in the office; is owned by a neutral actor and is free of charge for propertyowners to use.Together with insights from the technical state-of-the art mapping and legal issues, wehave gathered these user-oriented insights in a list of requirements for a future tool. Toconclude the project, we conducted a workshop with invited actors from thevisualization and solar shading industry to secure the relevance of the technicalrequirement list and identify further important questions for a future developmentphase. Future challenges include identifying a neutral owner for the tool, identify areasonable payment model, as well as implementing the tool step-wise while waitingfor necessary technical advances in the area of augmented reality and 3D datarespectively.

Series
Rapport från Smart Built Environment
Keywords
solenergi, solel, BIPV, fasader, fastighetsägare, digitalisering, AR
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-40217 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2019-10-08 Created: 2019-10-08 Last updated: 2019-10-09Bibliographically approved
Björn-Hansen, A. & Håkansson, M. (2018). Building Momentum: Scaling up Change in Community Organizations. In: : . Paper presented at CHI 2018, April 21–26, 2018, Montréal, QC, Canada. , Article ID Paper 410.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Building Momentum: Scaling up Change in Community Organizations
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Addressing calls in Sustainable HCI to scale up our work in HCI targeting sustainability, and the current knowledge gap of how to do this practically, we here present a qualitative study of 10 sustainability-oriented community organizations that are working to scale up their change making. They are all loosely connected to a local Transition network, meaning that they are aiming at transforming current practices in society, through local and practical action, to meet challenges related to climate change. We wanted to know how they try to scale up their change making, and what role ICT plays in enabling scaling up. The study contributes new insights about three stages of scaling up, in which ICT plays different roles. We conclude with implications for HCI for how to support community organizations in scaling up, while keeping values important for working toward a more resilient society.

Keywords
Human-centered computing
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-33849 (URN)10.1145/3173574.3173984 (DOI)2-s2.0-85046936580 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-5620-6 (ISBN)
Conference
CHI 2018, April 21–26, 2018, Montréal, QC, Canada
Available from: 2018-05-14 Created: 2018-05-14 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Knowles, B., Bates, O. & Håkansson, M. (2018). This changes sustainable HCI. In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings: . Paper presented at 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2018, 21 April 2018 through 26 April 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>This changes sustainable HCI
2018 (English)In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

More than a decade into Sustainable HCI (SHCI) research, the community is still struggling to converge on a shared understanding of sustainability and HCI's role in addressing it. We think this is largely a positive sign, reflective of maturity; yet, lacking a clear set of aims and metrics for sustainability continues to be the community's impediment to progressing, hence we seek to articulate a vision around which the community can productively coalesce. Drawing from recent SHCI publications, we identify commonalities that might form the basis of a shared understanding, and we show that this understanding closely aligns with the authoritative conception of a path to a sustainable future proffered by Naomi Klein in her book This Changes Everything. We elaborate a set of contributions that SHCI is already making that can be unified under Klein's narrative, and compare these categories of work to those found in past surveys of the field as evidence of substantive progress in SHCI.

Keywords
Climate change, Reflective HCI, Sustainability, Sustainable HCI, Human engineering, Sustainable development, Community IS, Shared understanding, Human computer interaction
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-34456 (URN)10.1145/3173574.3174045 (DOI)2-s2.0-85046934498 (Scopus ID)9781450356206 (ISBN)9781450356213 (ISBN)
Conference
2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2018, 21 April 2018 through 26 April 2018
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2018-08-22Bibliographically approved
Fernaeus, Y., Håkansson, M., Jacobsson, M. & Ljungblad, S. (2010). How do you Play with a Robotic Toy Animal? A long-term study of Pleo (7ed.). In: : . Paper presented at Interaction Design and Children 2010.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How do you Play with a Robotic Toy Animal? A long-term study of Pleo
2010 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Pleo is one of the more advanced interactive toys currently available for the home market, taking the form of a robotic dinosaur. We present an exploratory study of how it was interacted with and reflected upon in the homes of six families during 2 to 10 months. Our analysis emphasizes a discrepancy between the participants’ initial desires to borrow a Pleo and what they reported later on about their actual experiences. Further, the data suggests an apparent tension between participants expecting the robot to work as a ‘toy’ while making consistent comparisons with real pet animals. We end by discussing a series of implications for design of this category of toys, in order to better maintain interest and engagement over time.

National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-23770 (URN)
Conference
Interaction Design and Children 2010
Projects
LIREC
Available from: 2016-10-31 Created: 2016-10-31 Last updated: 2018-08-22Bibliographically approved
Graves Petersen, M., Ljungblad, S. & Håkansson, M. (2009). Designing for Playful Photography (9ed.). New Review of Hypermedia and Multimedia, 15, 193-209
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing for Playful Photography
2009 (English)In: New Review of Hypermedia and Multimedia, ISSN 1361-4568, E-ISSN 1740-7842, Vol. 15, p. 193-209Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper highlights the concept of playful photography as an emerging and important area for Human Computer Interaction (HCI) research, through bringing together three research projects investigating new ways of engaging with digital photography with theories related to playfulness and experience-centred design. Drawing upon this, we start to unpack playful photography and its characteristics. Instead of aiming for a unifying theory of photography related to experience-centred research, we take a reflective stance on our own research work. This is intended to encourage a critical discussion about playful photography, as well as support the on-going research in this area with a possible theoretical perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2009 Edition: 9
Keywords
Mobile Life
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-23607 (URN)10.1080/13614560903204653 (DOI)
Note

New Review of Hypermedia and Multimedia: Special Issue on Next Generation Experience Design

Available from: 2016-10-31 Created: 2016-10-31 Last updated: 2018-08-22Bibliographically approved
Håkansson, M. (2009). On the move - sharing music, inspiration and fun (6ed.). Vodafone receiver magazine
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the move - sharing music, inspiration and fun
2009 (English)In: Vodafone receiver magazineArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Mobile Life
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-23609 (URN)
Note

Seizing the moment

Available from: 2016-10-31 Created: 2016-10-31 Last updated: 2018-08-22Bibliographically approved
Håkansson, M. (2009). Studying Mobile Music Sharing (6ed.). In: : . Paper presented at CHI 2009, workshop on “Mobile User Experience Research: Challenges, Methods & Tools”.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Studying Mobile Music Sharing
2009 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Keywords
Mobile Life
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-23610 (URN)
Conference
CHI 2009, workshop on “Mobile User Experience Research: Challenges, Methods & Tools”
Projects
Mobile Life Centre
Available from: 2016-10-31 Created: 2016-10-31 Last updated: 2018-08-22Bibliographically approved
Gaye, L., Håkansson, M., Ljungblad, S. & Holmquist, L. E. (2007). Context Photography (1ed.). vague terrain
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Context Photography
2007 (English)In: vague terrainArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-22279 (URN)
Available from: 2016-10-31 Created: 2016-10-31 Last updated: 2018-08-22Bibliographically approved
Håkansson, M., Rost, M., Jacobsson, M. & Holmquist, L. E. (2007). Facilitating Mobile Music Sharing and Social Interaction with Push!Music (1ed.). In: : . Paper presented at Proceedings of Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS-40).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Facilitating Mobile Music Sharing and Social Interaction with Push!Music
2007 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Push!Music is a novel mobile music listening and sharing system, where users automatically receive songs that have autonomously recommended themselves from nearby players depending on similar listening behaviour and music history. Push!Music also enables users to wirelessly send songs between each other as personal recommendations. We conducted a two-week preliminary user study of Push!Music, where a group of five friends used the application in their everyday life. We learned for example that the shared music in Push!Music became a start for social interaction and that received songs in general were highly appreciated and could be looked upon as ‘treats’.

Publisher
p. 10
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-22283 (URN)
Conference
Proceedings of Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS-40)
Available from: 2016-10-31 Created: 2016-10-31 Last updated: 2018-08-22Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3418-8385

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