Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 25) Show all publications
Hornborg, S. & Svedäng, H. (2019). Baltic cod fisheries – current status and future opportunities.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Baltic cod fisheries – current status and future opportunities
2019 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This study quantifies a set of sustainability indicators (environmental, economic, social and institutional) for the Baltic cod fisheries (western and eastern stock) and explores the effects of different alternative management options in short term (for both stocks) and longer term (for the eastern stock). Data collected are biased towards the Swedish fishing industry, but most findings are relevant for all countries exploiting the stocks.

Based on results in this study, it is evident that management actions are needed at many levels to improve the current situation. Some of the observed problems with the cod fisheries today are due to external influences, outside of fisheries management remit (such as seal conflicts, oxygen-depleted areas). Nevertheless, this should not hinder management actions on what may be better understood and managed for in a fisheries context. For the eastern stock, the most pertinent issue is mitigation of density-dependence or feeding shortages. It is urgent with further investigations on what is the most important driver such as consider risks with current selectivity and effort regime, as well as act to improve herring and sprat availability where cod is abundant. Interestingly, it is found that increased seal predation may have a mitigating effect on density-dependence of cod in a trawl-based selectivity regime (i.e. result in higher landings and improved stock structure compared to lower predation pressure); for passive gears, it is the opposite. For the western stock, decreasing fishing effort and allowing the stock to rebuild is the most urgent action.

To this end, the present governance system may improve in many ways, and it is recommended to do a thorough analysis of what may be done to improve effectiveness of accomplishing current aspirational policy objectives.

Publisher
p. 32
Series
RISE Rapport ; 2019:29
Keywords
Baltic Sea, cod, selectivity, density-dependence, ecosystem-based fisheries management
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-38343 (URN)
Available from: 2019-04-29 Created: 2019-04-29 Last updated: 2019-04-29Bibliographically approved
Hornborg, S. & Mann, M. (2019). Broad sustainability analysis of Northern shrimp fisheries in the Skagerrak.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Broad sustainability analysis of Northern shrimp fisheries in the Skagerrak
2019 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Fisheries for Northern shrimp

Pandalus borealis in the Skagerrak have been given much media attention in recent years, initiated by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) in Sweden listing the product as "avoid" in their consumer guide in 2014. Even with the current eco-certification by Marine Stewardship Council (MSC), there is still questions concerning the development in the fishery since 2014. The WWF has therefore commissioned a report to follow up what has happened in the fishery.

The overall aim of the study is therefore to collate information on sustainability aspects of current shrimp fisheries in the Skagerrak (Norwegian, Danish and Swedish fisheries) to provide a transparent report on current fisheries. Since sustainability comprise of many dimensions, the shrimp fisheries are e.g. in Sweden seen as an iconic cultural activity for coastal communities, broader evaluations are needed than those that currently are done. The point of departure is therefore to utilize the approach of the Australian Fisheries Healthcheck

– a project aiming to provide transparent reporting of a broad range of indicators (sorted into environmental, social & cultural, economic, governance and external influences categories). The intention of Healthcheck is to support existing seafood guides, fishery reports and managers, and provide information to interested citizens.

It was found that much data is already collected on an annual basis that may be used for the Healthcheck indicators, but the data was often not available and analysed on a fishery basis. The shrimp fishery, and many other European fisheries, is also different to most Australian fisheries since it is multijurisdictional, and thus associated to different management objectives between countries

– this is markedly reflected by differences in the three countries’ fleets and fishing patterns, data collection and officially available documentation concerning the shrimp fishery. Few across-countries, standardized indicators could therefore today be reported on for the whole fishery, thus requiring further effort. Several indicators may also require further investigation in terms what may be appropriate metrics for the indicator that is aligned with European circumstances. The study can therefore be seen as a pilot collating which data is currently available to report on broader sustainability aspects of relevance to European fisheries, whereas a future, more detailed analysis of the fishery is needed to investigate the data more in detail.

Concerning the sustainability of the Skagerrak shrimp fishery, the analysis indicates that the overall development shows some positive signals in recent years, such as improved selectivity and more area restrictions to protect sensitive habitats. However, the arguable most basic components of a sustainable fishery

– exploitation level and stock status – exhibit some alarming signals. Furthermore, with landing per unit effort declining in recent years, pressure in the form of e.g. fuel use and habitat impact per kg landed shrimp may be negatively affected, requiring further attention.

Publisher
p. 50
Series
RISE Rapport ; 2019:36
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-38886 (URN)978-91-88907-63-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-05-27 Created: 2019-05-27 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
Hornborg, S. & Främberg, A. (2019). Carp (Cyprinidae) Fisheries in Swedish Lakes: A Combined Environmental Assessment Approach to Evaluate Data-limited Freshwater Fish Resources as Food. Environmental Management
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carp (Cyprinidae) Fisheries in Swedish Lakes: A Combined Environmental Assessment Approach to Evaluate Data-limited Freshwater Fish Resources as Food
2019 (English)In: Environmental Management, ISSN 0364-152X, E-ISSN 1432-1009Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The role of aquatic resources to food security is both promising and constrained since the global seafood consumption is increasing while marine fisheries approach the limit of what it can produce. In Sweden, the seafood consumption per capita is higher than the European and world average but the current dietary advice is to increase consumption. Freshwater fisheries have in general been paid less attention in food security discussions. Carp fishes (Cyprinidae) in Sweden have lost their historical value and are currently, both understudied and underutilized. Here we use a combined environmental assessment approach to examine the environmental sustainability of current and potential cyprinid fisheries. We found that current commercial fisheries for Swedish cyprinids in lakes have an average carbon footprint of 0.77 kg CO2e per kg of edible product, substantially smaller than most of the popular marine and terrestrial protein sources consumed in Sweden today. This could be even lower if cyprinid resources were better utilized than currently. The cyprinids however exhibited different vulnerability to fishing pressure and are today associated with data deficiencies. Hence, it is currently uncertain how much food for human consumption they can contribute to. Improved consumer interest and management attention is needed, but to the Swedish diet, cyprinids offer a promising opportunity for future more sustainable and nutritious food systems. © 2020, The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Cyprinidae, Environmental assessment, Food security, Freshwater fisheries, Life cycle assessment, Productivity susceptibility analysis, Carbon footprint, Environmental impact, Fish, Fisheries, Food supply, Lakes, Life cycle, Sustainable development, Water, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Susceptibility analysis, Meats
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-42504 (URN)10.1007/s00267-019-01241-z (DOI)2-s2.0-85077074197 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Svenska Forskningsrådet Formas, 2016-00455, 2016-00227; Funding text 1: The authors want to thank the fishers who provided the data and Jonatan Fogel who assisted in interviewing fishers in lake Mälaren. SH want to acknowledge funding from the Swedish Research Council Formas in the form of two grants, SEAWIN (2016-00227) and mobility grant (2016-00455). Open access funding provided by RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.

Available from: 2020-01-09 Created: 2020-01-09 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
Cottrell, R., Nash, K., Halpern, B., Remenyi, T., Corney, S., Fleming, A., . . . Blanchard, J. (2019). Food production shocks across land and sea. Nature Sustainability, 2, 130-137
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Food production shocks across land and sea
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Nature Sustainability, ISSN 2398-9629, Vol. 2, p. 130-137Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sudden losses to food production (that is, shocks) and their consequences across land and sea pose cumulative threats to global sustainability. We conducted an integrated assessment of global production data from crop, livestock, aquaculture and fisheries sectors over 53 years to understand how shocks occurring in one food sector can create diverse and linked challenges among others. We show that some regions are shock hotspots, exposed frequently to shocks across multiple sectors. Critically, shock frequency has increased through time on land and sea at a global scale. Geopolitical and extreme-weather events were the main shock drivers identified, but with considerable differences across sectors. We illustrate how social and ecological drivers, influenced by the dynamics of the food system, can spill over multiple food sectors and create synchronous challenges or trade-offs among terrestrial and aquatic systems. In a more shock-prone and interconnected world, bold food policy and social protection mechanisms that help people anticipate, cope with and recover from losses will be central to sustainability. © 2019, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Limited.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-37756 (URN)10.1038/s41893-018-0210-1 (DOI)2-s2.0-85060777051 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-02-11 Created: 2019-02-11 Last updated: 2019-02-11Bibliographically approved
Hornborg, S., Hallström, E., Ziegler, F., Bergman, K., Troell, M., Jonell, M., . . . Henriksson, P. (2019). Frisk med fisk utan risk?: Betydelsen av svensk konsumtion av sjömat för hälsa och miljö.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Frisk med fisk utan risk?: Betydelsen av svensk konsumtion av sjömat för hälsa och miljö
Show others...
2019 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Alternative title[en]
The importance of Swedish seafood consumption for health and environment
Abstract [en]

Seafood is a diverse food commodity, comprising of over 2 500 species from capture fisheries and over 600 species from farming, with vast differences between production methods. Dietary advice often includes recommendations to increase consumption of seafood, based on health benefits and that seafood may be produced with less environmental impacts and resources use compared to many other animal-based foods. However, at the same time, there are frequent media alarms related to potential health risks (some species have diet restrictions) and destructive production practices from both fisheries and aquaculture. As a result, there is often confusion on which seafood to eat or not to eat.The aim of this report is primarily to collate available information on health risks and benefits of Swedish seafood consumption, and to combine this with environmental aspects (focus on carbon footprint).Around 40 seafood products consumed in Sweden were included in the analysis. Potential health risks could only be included qualitatively, since the collected data is risk-based and thus not all products are sampled. It was found that the nutritional content and carbon footprint vastly differ between species. There were also several data gaps identified, such as the need for more detailed data on performance from different production systems. The combined assessment of nutritional value and carbon footprint categorised some species as win-win in terms of nutritional content and environmental pressures (such as small pelagic fish), while others could be more categorised as having less nutritional value and with high environmental costs (such as Northern prawn) respectively.The report provides decision support for further data collection needed to enable combined assessment of nutritional risks, benefits and environmental sustainability of seafood products. Results may be used to discuss suitable level of details of dietary advice.

Publisher
p. 65
Series
RISE Rapport ; 2019:38
Keywords
sustainable nutrition, seafood, aquaculture, fisheries, health, toxins
National Category
Agricultural Science, Forestry and Fisheries Fish and Aquacultural Science Nutrition and Dietetics Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-38331 (URN)978-91-88907-65-3 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Note

Den här rapporten är ett gemensamt initiativ från två forskningsprojekt finansierade inom ramen för Forskningsrådet för miljö, areella näringar och samhällsbyggande (Formas) satsning på livsmedelsforskning: projektet SeaWin som syftar till att identifiera vad hållbart ökande av produktion och konsumtion av sjömat i Sverige innebär ur ett miljöperspektiv (pågår 2016-2021) och det ettåriga projektet "Syntes av miljö- och nutritionsdata för sjömat- en bas för optimering av framtida dieter för hälsa och hållbarhet" som avslutas 2019 (och som skapades just för att möta kunskapsbristen om sjömats kombinerade näringsinnehåll och klimatpåverkan).

Available from: 2019-04-15 Created: 2019-04-15 Last updated: 2019-04-18Bibliographically approved
Ziegler, F., Groen, E. A., Hornborg, S., Bokkers, E. A. M., Karlsen, K. M. & de Boer, I. J. M. (2018). Assessing broad life cycle impacts of daily onboard decision-making, annual strategic planning, and fisheries management in a northeast Atlantic trawl fishery. The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 23(7), 1357-1367
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing broad life cycle impacts of daily onboard decision-making, annual strategic planning, and fisheries management in a northeast Atlantic trawl fishery
Show others...
2018 (English)In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, ISSN 0948-3349, E-ISSN 1614-7502, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 1357-1367Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Capture fisheries are the only industrial-scale harvesting of a wild resource for food. Temporal variability in environmental performance of fisheries has only recently begun to be explored, but only between years, not within a year. Our aim was to better understand the causes of temporal variability within and between years and to identify improvement options through management at a company level and in fisheries management. Methods: We analyzed the variability in broad environmental impacts of a demersal freeze trawler targeting cod, haddock, saithe, and shrimp, mainly in the Norwegian Sea and in the Barents Sea. The analysis was based on daily data for fishing activities between 2011 and 2014 and the functional unit was a kilo of landing from one fishing trip. We used biological indicators in a novel hierarchic approach, depending on data availability, to quantify biotic impacts. Landings were categorized as target (having defined target reference points) or bycatch species (classified as threatened or as data-limited). Indicators for target and bycatch impacts were quantified for each fishing trip, as was the seafloor area swept. Results and discussion: No significant difference in fuel use was found between years, but variability was considerable within a year, i.e., between fishing trips. Trips targeting shrimp were more fuel intensive than those targeting fish, due to a lower catch rate. Steaming to and from port was less important for fuel efficiency than steaming between fishing locations. A tradeoff was identified between biotic and abiotic impacts. Landings classified as main target species generally followed the maximum sustainable yield (MSY) framework, and proportions of threatened species were low, while proportions of data-limited bycatch were larger. This improved considerably when reference points were defined for saithe in 2014. Conclusions: The variability between fishing trips shows that there is room for improvement through management. Fuel use per landing was strongly influenced by target species, fishing pattern, and fisheries management. Increased awareness about the importance of onboard decision-making can lead to improved performance. This approach could serve to document performance over time helping fishing companies to better understand the effect of their daily and more long-term decision-making on the environmental performance of their products. Recommendations: Fishing companies should document their resource use and production on a detailed level. Fuel use should be monitored as part of the management system. Managing authorities should ensure that sufficient data is available to evaluate the sustainability of exploitation levels of all harvested species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2018
Keywords
Bycatch, Cod, Fisheries management, Fuel, Haddock, LCA, Shrimp, Trawling
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-34300 (URN)10.1007/s11367-015-0898-3 (DOI)2-s2.0-84930526132 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-30 Created: 2018-07-30 Last updated: 2019-07-02Bibliographically approved
Zurek, M., Hebinck, A., Leip, A., Vervoort, J., Kuiper, M., Garrone, M., . . . Achterbosch, T. (2018). Assessing sustainable food and nutrition security of the EU food system-an integrated approach. Sustainability, 10(11), Article ID 4271.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing sustainable food and nutrition security of the EU food system-an integrated approach
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 11, article id 4271Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Steering the EU food system towards a sustainability transformation requires a vast and actionable knowledge base available to a range of public and private actors. Few have captured this complexity by assessing food systems from a multi-dimensional and multi-level perspective, which would include (1) nutrition and diet, environmental and economic outcomes together with social equity dimensions and (2) system interactions across country, EU and global scales. This paper addresses this gap in food systems research and science communication by providing an integrated analytical approach and new ways to communicate this complexity outside science. Based on a transdisciplinary science approach with continuous stakeholder input, the EU Horizon2020 project 'Metrics, Models and Foresight for European SUStainable Food And Nutrition Security' (SUSFANS) developed a five-step process: Creating a participatory space; designing a conceptual framework of the EU food system; developing food system performance metrics; designing a modelling toolbox and developing a visualization tool. The Sustainable Food and Nutrition-Visualizer, designed to communicate complex policy change-impacts and trade-off questions, enables an informed debate about trade-offs associated with options for change among food system actors as well as in the policy making arena. The discussion highlights points for further research related to indicator development, reach of assessment models, participatory processes and obstacles in science communication. © 2018 by the authors.

Keywords
Food system assessment, Food systems, Interdisciplinarity, Metrics, Participatory approach, SUSFANS, Sustainable food and nutrition security
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-36595 (URN)10.3390/su10114271 (DOI)2-s2.0-85056731447 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-06 Created: 2018-12-06 Last updated: 2019-02-05Bibliographically approved
Hobday, A. J., Fleming, A., Ogier, E. M., Thomas, L., Hartog, J. R., Hornborg, S. & Stephenson, R. L. (2018). Perceptions regarding the need for broad sustainability assessments of Australian fisheries. Fisheries Research, 208, 247-257
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions regarding the need for broad sustainability assessments of Australian fisheries
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Fisheries Research, ISSN 0165-7836, E-ISSN 1872-6763, Vol. 208, p. 247-257Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Demonstration of fishery sustainability has expanded from a relatively narrow biological focus to one that includesa wide range of issues in response to environmental legislation, social factors, and demands from marketsand consumers. The Healthcheck for Australian Fisheries Sustainability (Healthcheck) is a new initiative designedto be comprehensive with regard to ecological, economic, social and governance aspects, presentingavailable information about a fishery for easy access and use. Here we report on the framework developmentprocess, including engagement with fishery managers, environmental non-government organisations, andfishery participants. All participants emphasized the need for a broad sustainability assessment with timelyreporting, easy availability, and wider coverage of seafood sustainability information than is currently accessible,and expressed the importance of trustworthy and transparent information. Differences were found whencomparing sustainability issues generally reported and issues of main concern to stakeholders. Subsequent refinementof the Healthcheck extended coverage into issues that are on the horizon for fishery reporting, but maysoon be of interest to a wide range of stakeholders.

Keywords
Socio-economic and governance metrics, Social license, Seafood guide, Reporting
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-35107 (URN)10.1016/j.fishres.2018.08.006 (DOI)2-s2.0-85052479391 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-03 Created: 2018-09-03 Last updated: 2019-01-16Bibliographically approved
Hornborg, S., Hobday, A. J., Ziegler, F., Smith, A. D., Green, B. S. & Gibbs, M. (2018). Shaping sustainability of seafood from capture fisheries integrating the perspectives of supply chain stakeholders through combining systems analysis tools. ICES Journal of Marine Science, Article ID fsy081.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shaping sustainability of seafood from capture fisheries integrating the perspectives of supply chain stakeholders through combining systems analysis tools
Show others...
2018 (English)In: ICES Journal of Marine Science, article id fsy081Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Seafood from capture fisheries can be assessed in many ways and for different purposes, with sometimes divergent views on what characterizes “sustainable use”. Here we use two systems analysis tools—Ecological Risk Assessment for Effects of Fishing (ERAEF) and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)—over the historical development of the Australian Patagonian toothfish fishery at Heard and McDonald Islands since the start in 1997. We find that ecological risks have been systematically identified in the management process using ERAEF, and with time have been mitigated, resulting in a lower risk fishery from an ecological impact perspective. LCA inventory data from the industry shows that fuel use per kilo has increased over the history of the fishery. Our results suggest that LCA and ERAEF may provide contrasting and complementary perspectives on sustainability and reveal trade-offs when used in combination. Incorporation of LCA perspectives in assessing impacts of fishing may facilitate refinement of ecosystem-based fisheries management, such as improved integration of the different perspectives of supply chain stakeholders.

Keywords
: Dissostichus eleginoides, ecological risk assessment, fisheries, fuel, Life Cycle Assessment, sustainable seafood product
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-34354 (URN)10.1093/icesjms/fsy081 (DOI)2-s2.0-85066009321 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-07 Created: 2018-08-07 Last updated: 2020-02-04Bibliographically approved
Svedäng, H. & Hornborg, S. (2017). Historic changes in length distributions of three Baltic cod (Gadus morhua) stocks: Evidence of growth retardation. Ecology and Evolution, 7(16), 6089-6102
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Historic changes in length distributions of three Baltic cod (Gadus morhua) stocks: Evidence of growth retardation
2017 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 7, no 16, p. 6089-6102Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Abstract [en]

Understanding how combinations of fishing effort and selectivity affect productivity is central to fisheries research. We investigate the roles of fishing regulation in comparison with ecosystem status for Baltic Sea cod stock productivity, growth performance, and population stability. This case study is interesting because three cod populations with different exploitation patterns and stock status are located in three adjacent but partially, ecologically different areas. In assessing stock status, growth, and productivity, we use survey information and rather basic stock parameters without relying on age readings. Because there is an urgent interest of better understanding of the current development of the Eastern Baltic cod stock, we argue that our approach represents partly a novel way of interpreting monitoring information together with catch data in a simplified yet more informative way. Our study reports how the Eastern and Western Baltic cod have gone toward more truncated size structures between 1991 and 2016, in particular for the Eastern Baltic cod, whereas the Öresund cod show no trend. We suggest that selective fishing may disrupt fish population dynamic stability and that lower natural productivity might amplify the effects of selective fishing. In support of earlier findings on a density-dependent growth of Eastern Baltic cod, management is advised to acknowledge that sustainable exploitation levels for Eastern Baltic cod are much more limited than perceived in regular assessments. Of more general importance, our results emphasize the need to embrace a more realistic view on what ecosystems can produce regarding tractable fish biomass to facilitate a more ecosystem-based fisheries management.

Keywords
Assessment, Baltic sea, Growth indices, Selectivity, Size spectrum, Stock productivity
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-31182 (URN)10.1002/ece3.3173 (DOI)2-s2.0-85021415040 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-23 Created: 2017-08-23 Last updated: 2019-01-03Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0814-5258

Search in DiVA

Show all publications
v. 2.35.10