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Cernencu, A., Lungu, A., Stancu, I., Serafim, A., Heggset, E. B., Syverud, K. & Iovu, H. (2019). Bioinspired 3D printable pectin-nanocellulose ink formulations. Carbohydrate Polymers, 220, 12-21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bioinspired 3D printable pectin-nanocellulose ink formulations
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2019 (English)In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 220, p. 12-21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The assessment of several ink formulations for 3D printing based on two natural macromolecular compounds is presented. In the current research we have exploited the fast crosslinking potential of pectin and the remarkable shear-thinning properties of carboxylated cellulose nanofibrils, which is known to induce a desired viscoelastic behavior. Prior to 3D printing, the viscoelastic properties of the polysaccharide inks were evaluated by rheological measurements and injectability tests. The reliance of the printing parameters on the ink composition was established through one-dimensional lines printing, the base units of 3D-structures. The performance of the 3D-printed structures after ionic cross-linking was evaluated in terms of mechanical properties and rehydration behavior. MicroCT was also used to evaluate the morphology of the 3D-printed objects regarding the effect of pectin/nanocellulose ratio on the geometrical features of scaffolds. The proportionality between the two polymers proved to be the determining factor for the firmness and strength of the printed objects. © 2019

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2019
Keywords
3D printing, Cellulose nanofibrils, Hydrogels, Pectin, Polysaccharide, Cellulose, Computerized tomography, Nanocellulose, Nanofibers, Polysaccharides, Shear flow, Shear thinning, Viscoelasticity, 3-D printing, Macromolecular compounds, Rehydration behavior, Rheological measurements, Visco-elastic behaviors, Viscoelastic properties, 3D printers
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-38922 (URN)10.1016/j.carbpol.2019.05.026 (DOI)2-s2.0-85065922721 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: 228147; Funding details: PN-III-P1-1.2-PCCDI-2017-0782; Funding text 1: The 3D printing experiments and MicroCT analysis were possible due to European Regional Development Fund through Competitiveness Operational Program 2014-2020, Priority axis 1, ID P_36_611, MySMIS code 107066, INOVABIOMED. A. Lungu would like to thank for the financial support provided by a grant of the Romanian Ministery of Research and Innovation, CCCDI – UEFISCDI, project number PN-III-P1-1.2-PCCDI-2017-0782 /REGMED – project 4 TUMOR, within PNCDI III. The authors would like to acknowledge the helpful discussions with Claudiu Patrascu on matters regarding rheology. Parts of this work has also been funded by the Research Council of Norway through the NORCEL project (Grant no. 228147 ). Appendix A

Available from: 2019-05-29 Created: 2019-05-29 Last updated: 2019-05-29Bibliographically approved
Aadland, R., Jakobsen, T., Heggset, E. B., Long-Sanouiller, H., Simon, S., Paso, K., . . . Torsæter, O. (2019). High-temperature core flood investigation of nanocellulose as a green additive for enhanced oil recovery. Nanomaterials, 9(5), Article ID 665.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High-temperature core flood investigation of nanocellulose as a green additive for enhanced oil recovery
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2019 (English)In: Nanomaterials, ISSN 2079-4991, Vol. 9, no 5, article id 665Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent studies have discovered a substantial viscosity increase of aqueous cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) dispersions upon heat aging at temperatures above 90 °C. This distinct change in material properties at very low concentrations in water has been proposed as an active mechanism for enhanced oil recovery (EOR), as highly viscous fluid may improve macroscopic sweep efficiencies and mitigate viscous fingering. A high-temperature (120 °C) core flood experiment was carried out with 1 wt.% CNC in low salinity brine on a 60 cm-long sandstone core outcrop initially saturated with crude oil. A flow rate corresponding to 24 h per pore volume was applied to ensure sufficient viscosification time within the porous media. The total oil recovery was 62.2%, including 1.2% oil being produced during CNC flooding. Creation of local log-jams inside the porous media appears to be the dominant mechanism for additional oil recovery during nano flooding. The permeability was reduced by 89.5% during the core flood, and a thin layer of nanocellulose film was observed at the inlet of the core plug. CNC fluid and core flood effluent was analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), particle size analysis, and shear rheology. The effluent was largely unchanged after passing through the core over a time period of 24 h. After the core outcrop was rinsed, a micro computed tomography (micro-CT) was used to examine heterogeneity of the core. The core was found to be homogeneous. © 2019 by the authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2019
Keywords
Cellulose nanocrystals, CNC, Core flood, Crude oil, Enhanced oil recovery, Heat aging, High temperature, Nanocellulose, Nanoparticle, Petroleum, Rheology modification, Tertiary recovery
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-39051 (URN)10.3390/nano9050665 (DOI)2-s2.0-85066947377 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Norges Forskningsråd, 244615/E30, 262644; Funding details: 245963/F50; Funding text 1: Funding: This research was funded by Research Council of Norway through grant 244615/E30 in the Petromaks2. Program and through the Centres of Excellence funding scheme, project number 262644.; Funding text 2: Acknowledgments: The authors would like to thank the Research Council of Norway for their financial support through the GreenEOR project (grant 244615/E30) in the Petromaks2 program, and through the Centres of Excellence funding scheme, project number 262644. The authors would also like to thank Per Olav Johnsen and Birgitte H. McDonagh for acquiring the AFM images. A big thank you to Martin Raphaug and Torleif Holt at SINTEF Petroleum for guidance and help during the core flood experiment. Thanks to Ole Tore Buset from the department of physics at NTNU for obtaining the micro-CT images at their X-ray laboratory. Lastly, the authors would like to thank Amin Hossein Zavieh at NTNU Nanolab/NorFab for acquiring the SEM images. The Research Council of Norway is acknowledged for the support to the Norwegian Micro-and Nano-Fabrication Facility, NorFab, project number 245963/F50.

Available from: 2019-06-26 Created: 2019-06-26 Last updated: 2019-06-26Bibliographically approved
Aaen, R., Brodin, F. W., Simon, S., Heggset, E. B. & Syverud, K. (2019). Oil-in-Water Emulsions Stabilized by Cellulose Nanofibrils-The Effects of Ionic Strength and pH.. Nanomaterials (Basel, Switzerland), 9(2), Article ID E259.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oil-in-Water Emulsions Stabilized by Cellulose Nanofibrils-The Effects of Ionic Strength and pH.
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2019 (English)In: Nanomaterials (Basel, Switzerland), ISSN 2079-4991, Vol. 9, no 2, article id E259Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pickering o/w emulsions prepared with 40 wt % rapeseed oil were stabilized with the use of low charged enzymatically treated cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) and highly charged 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-oxidized CNFs. The emulsion-forming abilities and storage stability of the two qualities were tested in the presence of NaCl and acetic acid, at concentrations relevant to food applications. Food emulsions may be an important future application area for CNFs due to their availability and excellent viscosifying abilities. The emulsion characterization was carried out by visual inspection, light microscopy, viscosity measurements, dynamic light scattering and mild centrifugation, which showed that stable emulsions could be obtained for both CNF qualities in the absence of salt and acid. In addition, the enzymatically stabilized CNFs were able to stabilize emulsions in the presence of acid and NaCl, with little change in the appearance or droplet size distribution over one month of storage at room temperature. The work showed that enzymatically treated CNFs could be suitable for use in food systems where NaCl and acid are present, while the more highly charged TEMPO-CNFs might be more suited for other applications, where they can contribute to a high emulsion viscosity even at low concentrations.

Keywords
TEMPO-oxidation, cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs), emulsion stability, enzymatical treatment, nanocelluloses, o/w emulsions
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-37818 (URN)10.3390/nano9020259 (DOI)30769791 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-01 Created: 2019-03-01 Last updated: 2019-03-06Bibliographically approved
Campodoni, E., Heggset, E. B., Rashad, A., Ramírez-Rodríguez, G. B., Mustafa, K., Syverud, K., . . . Sandri, M. (2019). Polymeric 3D scaffolds for tissue regeneration: Evaluation of biopolymer nanocomposite reinforced with cellulose nanofibrils. Materials science & engineering. C, biomimetic materials, sensors and systems, 94, 867-878
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Polymeric 3D scaffolds for tissue regeneration: Evaluation of biopolymer nanocomposite reinforced with cellulose nanofibrils
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2019 (English)In: Materials science & engineering. C, biomimetic materials, sensors and systems, ISSN 0928-4931, E-ISSN 1873-0191, Vol. 94, p. 867-878Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biopolymers such as gelatin (Gel) and cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) have many of the essential requirements for being used as scaffolding materials in tissue regeneration; biocompatibility, surface chemistry, ability to generate homogeneous hydrogels and 3D structures with suitable pore size and interconnection, which allows cell colonization and proliferation. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the mechanical behaviour of the Gel matrix can be improved by means of functionalization with cellulose nanofibrils and proper cross-linking treatments. Blending processes were developed to achieve a polymer nanocomposite incorporating the best features of both biopolymers: biomimicry of the Gel and structural reinforcement by the CNF. The designed 3D structures underline interconnected porosity achieved by freeze-drying process, improved mechanical properties and chemical stability that are tailored by CNF addition and different cross-linking approaches. In vitro evaluations reveal the preservation of the biocompatibility of Gel and its good interaction with cells by promoting cell colonization and proliferation. The results support the addition of cellulose nanofibrils to improve the mechanical behaviour of 3D porous structures suitable as scaffolding for tissue regeneration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Cross-linking, Nanoreinforcement, Polymer blend, Soft tissues, Biocompatibility, Biomechanics, Biomimetics, Biomolecules, Biopolymers, Blending, Cellulose, Chemical stability, Crosslinking, Mechanical properties, Nanocomposites, Nanofibers, Polymer blends, Pore size, Reinforcement, Scaffolds (biology), Surface chemistry, Tissue, Cellulose nanofibrils, Freeze-drying process, Interconnected porosity, Polymer nanocomposite, Scaffolding materials, Soft tissue, Structural reinforcement, Tissue regeneration
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-35568 (URN)10.1016/j.msec.2018.10.026 (DOI)2-s2.0-85054676906 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding text: The authors would like to thank the grant no. 228147 - NORCEL project “The NORwegian nanoCELlulose Technology Platform”

Available from: 2018-11-06 Created: 2018-11-06 Last updated: 2019-03-06Bibliographically approved
Heggset, E. B., Strand, B. L., Sundby, K. W., Simon, S., Chinga-Carrasco, G. & Syverud, K. (2019). Viscoelastic properties of nanocellulose based inks for 3D printing and mechanical properties of CNF/alginate biocomposite gels. Cellulose (London) (1), 581-595
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Viscoelastic properties of nanocellulose based inks for 3D printing and mechanical properties of CNF/alginate biocomposite gels
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2019 (English)In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, no 1, p. 581-595Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Inks for 3D printing based on cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) or mixtures of CNFs and either cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) or alginate were assessed by determining their viscoelastic properties i.e. complex viscosity and storage and loss moduli (G′ and G″). Two types of alginates were used, i.e. from Laminaria hyperborea stipe and Macrocystis pyrifera. Shape fidelity of 3D printed grids were qualitatively evaluated and compared to the viscoelastic properties of the inks. The biocomposite gels containing alginate were post stabilized by crosslinking with Ca2+. Mechanical properties of the crosslinked biocomposite gels were assessed. The complex viscosity, G′ and G″ of CNF suspensions increased when the solid content was increased from 3.5 to 4.0 wt%, but levelled off by further increase in CNF solid content. The complex viscosity at low angular frequency at 4 wt% was as high as 104 Pa·s. This seemed to be the necessary viscosity level for obtaining good shape fidelity of the printed structures for the studied systems. By replacing part of the CNFs with CNCs, the complex viscosity, G′ and G″ were reduced and so was also the shape fidelity of the printed grids. The changes in complex viscosity and moduli when CNFs was replaced with alginate depended on the relative amounts of CNFs/alginate. The type of alginate (from either L. hyp. stipe or M. pyr.) did not play a role for the viscoelastic properties of the inks, nor for the printed grids before post stabilization. Replacing CNFs with up to 1.5 wt% alginate gave satisfactory shape fidelity. The effect of adding alginate and subsequent crosslinking with Ca2+, strongly affected the strength properties of the gels. By appropriate choice of relative amounts of CNFs and alginate and type of alginate, the Young’s modulus and rupture strength could be controlled within the range of 30–150 kPa and 1.5–6 kg, respectively. The deformation at rupture was around 55%. The alginate from L. hyp. stipe yields higher Young’s modulus and lower syneresis compared to M. pyr. This shows that the choice of alginate plays a significant role for the mechanical properties of the final product, although it does not influence on the viscoelastic properties of the ink. The choice of alginate should be L. hyp. stipe if high strength is desired.

Keywords
Alginate, Cellulose, Cellulose derivatives, Composite materials, Hydrogels, Mechanical properties, Nanocellulose, Rheology, Suspensions, Viscoelasticity, Viscosity, 3-D printing
National Category
Nano Technology Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-36660 (URN)10.1007/s10570-018-2142-3 (DOI)2-s2.0-85057032463 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2019-03-06Bibliographically approved
Rashad, A., Mohamed-Ahmed, S., Ojansivu, M., Berstad, K., Yassin, M., Kivijärvi, T., . . . Mustafa, K. (2018). Coating 3D Printed Polycaprolactone Scaffolds with Nanocellulose Promotes Growth and Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells. Biomacromolecules, 19(11), 4307-4319
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coating 3D Printed Polycaprolactone Scaffolds with Nanocellulose Promotes Growth and Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells
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2018 (English)In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 19, no 11, p. 4307-4319Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

3D printed polycaprolactone (PCL) has potential as a scaffold for bone tissue engineering, but the hydrophobic surface may hinder optimal cell responses. The surface properties can be improved by coating the scaffold with cellulose nanofibrils material (CNF), a multiscale hydrophilic biocompatible biomaterial derived from wood. In this study, human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on tissue culture plates (TCP) and 3D printed PCL scaffolds coated with CNF. Cellular responses to the surfaces (viability, attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation) were documented. CNF significantly enhanced the hydrophilic properties of PCL scaffolds and promoted protein adsorption. Live/dead staining and lactate dehydrogenase release assays confirmed that CNF did not inhibit cellular viability. The CNF between the 3D printed PCL strands and pores acted as a hydrophilic barrier, enhancing cell seeding efficiency, and proliferation. CNF supported the formation of a well-organized actin cytoskeleton and cellular production of vinculin protein on the surfaces of TCP and PCL scaffolds. Moreover, CNF-coated surfaces enhanced not only alkaline phosphatase activity, but also collagen Type-I and mineral formation. It is concluded that CNF coating enhances cell attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation and has the potential to improve the performance of 3D printed PCL scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

Keywords
Biocompatibility, Bone, Cell culture, Cell engineering, Cellulose, Coatings, Hydrophilicity, Hydrophobicity, Nanocellulose, Phosphatases, Polycaprolactone, Scaffolds (biology), Stem cells, Surface chemistry, Tissue, Tissue culture, Transmission control protocol, Wood, Alkaline phosphatase activity, Bone tissue engineering, Cellulose nanofibrils, Human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells, Hydrophilic properties, Lactate dehydrogenase, Osteogenic differentiation, Polycaprolactone scaffolds, 3D printers
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-35909 (URN)10.1021/acs.biomac.8b01194 (DOI)2-s2.0-85055577081 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-06 Created: 2018-11-06 Last updated: 2019-03-06Bibliographically approved
Aadland, R. C., Dziuba, C. J., Heggset, E. B., Syverud, K., Torsæter, O., Holt, T., . . . Bryant, S. L. (2018). Identification of nanocellulose retention characteristics in porous media. Nanomaterials, 8(7), Article ID 547.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of nanocellulose retention characteristics in porous media
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2018 (English)In: Nanomaterials, ISSN 2079-4991, Vol. 8, no 7, article id 547Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The application of nanotechnology to the petroleum industry has sparked recent interest in increasing oil recovery, while reducing environmental impact. Nanocellulose is an emerging nanoparticle that is derived from trees or waste stream from wood and fiber industries. Thus, it is taken from a renewable and sustainable source, and could therefore serve as a good alternative to current Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) technologies. However, before nanocellulose can be applied as an EOR technique, further understanding of its transport behavior and retention in porous media is required. The research documented in this paper examines retention mechanisms that occur during nanocellulose transport. In a series of experiments, nanocellulose particles dispersed in brine were injected into sandpacks and Berea sandstone cores. The resulting retention and permeability reduction were measured. The experimental parameters that were varied include sand grain size, nanocellulose type, salinity, and flow rate. Under low salinity conditions, the dominant retention mechanism was adsorption and when salinity was increased, the dominant retention mechanism shifted towards log-jamming. Retention and permeability reduction increased as grain size decreased, which results from increased straining of nanocellulose aggregates. In addition, each type of nanocellulose was found to have significantly different transport properties. Experiments with Berea sandstone cores indicate that some pore volume was inaccessible to the nanocellulose. As a general trend, the larger the size of aggregates in bulk solution, the greater the observed retention and permeability reduction. Salinity was found to be the most important parameter affecting transport. Increased salinity caused additional aggregation, which led to increased straining and filter cake formation. Higher flow rates were found to reduce retention and permeability reduction. Increased velocity was accompanied by an increase in shear, which is believed to promote breakdown of nanocellulose aggregates. © 2018 by the authors.

Keywords
Cellulose nanocrystals, Energy, Nanocellulose, Nanoparticle, Oil, Petrochemical, Petroleum, Retention
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-34574 (URN)10.3390/nano8070547 (DOI)2-s2.0-85050584455 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: CERC35, CERC, Canada Excellence Research Chairs, Government of Canada; Funding details: 974 767 880; Funding details: 262644, I-CORE, Israeli Centers for Research Excellence; Funding details: RGPAS/477902-2015, NSERC, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; Funding details: 244615/E30, Norges Forskningsråd; Funding details: 244615/E30; Funding details: 262644, CERC, Canada Excellence Research Chairs, Government of Canada; Funding details: NSERC, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada;

Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2019-03-06Bibliographically approved
Jakobsen, T. D., Simon, S., Heggset, E. B., Syverud, K. & Paso, K. (2018). Interactions between surfactants and cellulose nanofibrils for enhanced oil recovery. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 57(46), 15749-15758
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interactions between surfactants and cellulose nanofibrils for enhanced oil recovery
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2018 (English)In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, ISSN 0888-5885, E-ISSN 1520-5045, Vol. 57, no 46, p. 15749-15758Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chemical enhanced oil recovery (EOR) represents a series of potential solutions for extracting more oil from resources with already known locations and magnitudes. Unfortunately, many of the chemical additives in use today are not environmentally friendly. In the study a "greener" alternative for increasing viscosity of the injection water is investigated, namely cellulose nanofibrils (CNF). The nanofibrils are combined in systems with anionic sulfonate surfactants, SDBS and AOT, in order to decrease interfacial tension (IFT) between oil and water. In combination, the increase of water viscosity and decrease of IFT should result in higher ultimate oil recovery than if only conventional water flooding was applied. Interactions between cellulose nanofibrils and the surfactants have been investigated through adsorption studies, rheology, and IFT measurements. An observed synergy effect between CNF and surfactants upon viscosity of injection water, as well as with substantial decrease in IFT, leads the authors to the conclusion that an EOR system consisting of CNF and sulfonate surfactants has good potential for future applications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society, 2018
Keywords
Anionic surfactants, Cellulose, Injection (oil wells), Molecular biology, Nanofibers, Oil well flooding, Viscosity, Water injection, Well flooding
National Category
Nano Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-36659 (URN)10.1021/acs.iecr.8b04206 (DOI)2-s2.0-85057167860 (Scopus ID)
Note

cited By 0

Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2019-03-06Bibliographically approved
Courtade, G., Forsberg, Z., Heggset, E. B., Eijsink, V. G. & Aachmann, F. L. (2018). The carbohydrate-binding module and linker of a modular lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase promote localized cellulose oxidation. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 293(34), 13006-13015
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The carbohydrate-binding module and linker of a modular lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase promote localized cellulose oxidation
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 293, no 34, p. 13006-13015Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are copper-dependent enzymes that catalyze the oxidative cleavage of polysaccharides such as cellulose and chitin, a feature that makes them key tools in industrial biomass conversion processes. The catalytic domains of a considerable fraction of LPMOs and other carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) are tethered to carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) by flexible linkers. These linkers preclude X-ray crystallographic studies, and the functional implications of these modular assemblies remain partly unknown. Here, we used NMR spectroscopy to characterize structural and dynamic features of full-length modular ScLPMO10C from Streptomyces coelicolor We observed that the linker is disordered and extended, creating distance between the CBM and the catalytic domain and allowing these domains to move independently of each other. Functional studies with cellulose nanofibrils revealed that most of the substrate-binding affinity of full-length ScLPMO10C resides in the CBM. Comparison of the catalytic performance of full-length ScLPMO10C and its isolated catalytic domain revealed that the CBM is beneficial for LPMO activity at lower substrate concentrations and promotes localized and repeated oxidation of the substrate. Taken together, these results provide a mechanistic basis for understanding the interplay between catalytic domains linked to CBMs in LPMOs and CAZymes in general.

Keywords
LPMO, biotechnology, carbohydrate-active enzyme, carbohydrate-binding module, cellulose, copper monooxygenase, hydrolytic enzyme, lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase, nanofibril, protein linker
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-35147 (URN)10.1074/jbc.RA118.004269 (DOI)29967065 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85052085941 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-10 Created: 2018-09-10 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Rashad, A., Mustafa, K., Heggset, E. B. & Syverud, K. (2017). Cytocompatibility of Wood-Derived Cellulose Nanofibril Hydrogels with Different Surface Chemistry. Biomacromolecules, 18(4), 1238-1248
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cytocompatibility of Wood-Derived Cellulose Nanofibril Hydrogels with Different Surface Chemistry
2017 (English)In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 1238-1248Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The current study aims to demonstrate the influence of the surface chemistry of wood-derived cellulose nanofibril (CNF) hydrogels on fibroblasts for tissue engineering applications. TEMPO-mediated oxidation or carboxymethylation pretreatments were employed to produce hydrogels with different surface chemistry. This study demonstrates the following: first, the gelation of CNF with cell culture medium and formation of stable hydrogels with improved rheological properties; second, the response of mouse fibroblasts cultured on the surface of the hydrogels or sandwiched within the materials with respect to cytotoxicity, cell attachment, proliferation, morphology, and migration. Indirect cytotoxicity tests showed no toxic effect of either hydrogel. The direct contact with the carboxymethylated hydrogel adversely influenced the morphology of the cells and limited their spreading, while typical morphology and spreading of cells were observed with the TEMPO-oxidized hydrogel. The porous fibrous structure may be a key to cell proliferation and migration in the hydrogels.

Keywords
Cell culture, Cell proliferation, Cells, Cellulose, Cytology, Fibroblasts, Gelation, Morphology, Nanofibers, Surface chemistry, Tissue engineering, Wood, Carboxymethylation, Cell culture mediums, Cytotoxicity test, Fibrous structures, Rheological property, TEMPO-mediated oxidation, Tissue engineering applications, Typical morphology, Hydrogels, cross linking reagent, divalent cation, lactate dehydrogenase, biomaterial, hydrogel, nanomaterial, animal cell, Article, atomic force microscopy, biocompatibility, bioprinting, cell adhesion, cell encapsulation, cell interaction, cell migration, cell migration assay, cell structure, cell viability, chemical bond, controlled study, cross linking, culture medium, cytocompatibility, cytoskeleton, cytotoxicity, extracellular matrix, fibroblast, hydrogen bond, methylation, mouse, MTT assay, nonhuman, oxidation, priority journal, scanning electron microscopy, surface property, tissue culture, wood derived cellulose nanofibril hydrogel, animal, cell motion, cell survival, chemistry, flow kinetics, infrared spectroscopy, porosity, Surface Properties, Animals, Biocompatible Materials, Cell Movement, Cells, Cultured, Mice, Nanostructures, Rheology, Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-33166 (URN)10.1021/acs.biomac.6b01911 (DOI)2-s2.0-85018467340 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding details: AFM, Association Française contre les Myopathies; Funding details: 245963/F50; Funding details: 302077, Helse Vest;Funding details: NTNU, National Taiwan Normal University; Funding details: 228147, Norges Forskningsråd

Available from: 2018-01-23 Created: 2018-01-23 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8876-8898

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