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Chinga-Carrasco, GaryORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6183-2017
Publications (10 of 94) Show all publications
Kangas, H., Felissia, F. E., Filgueira, D., Ehman, N. V., Vallejos, M. E., Imlauer, C. M., . . . Chinga-Carrasco, G. (2019). 3D Printing High-Consistency Enzymatic Nanocellulose Obtained from a Soda-Ethanol-O2 Pine Sawdust Pulp.. Bioengineering (Basel, Switzerland), 6(3), Article ID E60.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>3D Printing High-Consistency Enzymatic Nanocellulose Obtained from a Soda-Ethanol-O2 Pine Sawdust Pulp.
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2019 (English)In: Bioengineering (Basel, Switzerland), ISSN 2306-5354, Vol. 6, no 3, article id E60Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Soda-ethanol pulps, prepared from a forestry residue pine sawdust, were treated according to high-consistency enzymatic fibrillation technology to manufacture nanocellulose. The obtained nanocellulose was characterized and used as ink for three-dimensional (3D) printing of various structures. It was also tested for its moisture sorption capacity and cytotoxicity, as preliminary tests for evaluating its suitability for wound dressing and similar applications. During the high-consistency enzymatic treatment it was found that only the treatment of the O2-delignified pine pulp resulted in fibrillation into nano-scale. For 3D printing trials, the material needed to be fluidized further. By 3D printing, it was possible to fabricate various structures from the high-consistency enzymatic nanocellulose. However, the water sorption capacity of the structures was lower than previously seen with porous nanocellulose structures, indicating that further optimization of the material is needed. The material was found not to be cytotoxic, thus showing potential as material, e.g., for wound dressings and for printing tissue models.

Keywords
3D printing, cytotoxicity, nanocellulose, pine sawdust, soda ethanol pulping
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-39716 (URN)10.3390/bioengineering6030060 (DOI)31315280 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
Silva, F., Gracia, N., McDonagh, B., Domingues, F., Nerín, C. & Chinga-Carrasco, G. (2019). Antimicrobial activity of biocomposite films containing cellulose nanofibrils and ethyl lauroyl arginate. Journal of Materials Science, 54(18), 12159-70
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antimicrobial activity of biocomposite films containing cellulose nanofibrils and ethyl lauroyl arginate
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Materials Science, ISSN 0022-2461, E-ISSN 1573-4803, Vol. 54, no 18, p. 12159-70Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Food packaging is tailored to keep food fresh by increasing shelf life and preventing microbial deterioration. However, traditional food packaging is commonly made from non-degradable polymers without antimicrobial properties and that pose an environmental threat if not disposed properly. To address this issue, here we describe the preparation of cellulose nanofibril (CNF) films and hydrogels with antimicrobial activity against common foodborne pathogens such as verotoxigenic E. coli, L. monocytogenes and S. Typhimurium. Furthermore, two grades of negatively charged CNFs with different fibrillation degrees were modified with ethyl lauroyl arginate (LAE), which is an antimicrobial agent. CNF films were able to bind LAE molecules up to a maximum concentration of 145–160 ppm. LAE–CNF biocomposite films exerted a bactericidal activity against a major foodborne pathogen present in ready-to-eat food (L. monocytogenes) even at 1% LAE. Our work describes a novel biopolymer-based strategy that overcomes the current hurdles with LAE incorporation into packaging materials, offering a green and antimicrobial alternative for packaging of ready-to-eat (RTE) meat products. .

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer New York LLC, 2019
Keywords
Antimicrobial agents, Cellulose, Cellulose films, Composite materials, Deterioration, Escherichia coli, Film preparation, Nanofibers, Packaging, Packaging machines, Packaging materials, Anti-microbial activity, Anti-microbial properties, Bactericidal activity, Cellulose nanofibrils, Environmental threats, Food-borne pathogens, Maximum concentrations, Microbial deterioration, Food microbiology
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-39283 (URN)10.1007/s10853-019-03759-3 (DOI)2-s2.0-85067416376 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-06-28 Created: 2019-06-28 Last updated: 2019-07-05Bibliographically approved
Chinga-Carrasco, G., Ehman, N., Filgueira, D., Johansson, J., Vallejos, M., Felissia, F., . . . Area, M. (2019). Bagasse—A major agro-industrial residue as potential resource for nanocellulose inks for 3D printing of wound dressing devices. Additive Manufacturing, 28, 267-274
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bagasse—A major agro-industrial residue as potential resource for nanocellulose inks for 3D printing of wound dressing devices
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2019 (English)In: Additive Manufacturing, ISSN 2214-8604, Vol. 28, p. 267-274Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sugarcane bagasse, an abundant residue, is usually burned as an energy source. However, provided that appropriate and sustainable pulping and fractionation processes are applied, bagasse can be utilized as a main source of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF). We explored in this study the production of CNF inks for 3D printing by direct-ink-writing technology. The CNF were tested against L929 fibroblasts cell line and we confirmed that the CNF from soda bagasse fibers were found not to have a cytotoxic potential. Additionally, we demonstrated that the alginate and Ca 2+ caused significant dimensional changes to the 3D printed constructs. The CNF-alginate grids exhibited a lateral expansion after printing and then shrank due to the cross-linking with the Ca 2+ . The release of Ca 2+ from the CNF and CNF-alginate constructs was quantified thus providing more insight about the CNF as carrier for Ca 2+ . This, combined with 3D printing, offers potential for personalized wound dressing devices, i.e. tailor-made constructs that can be adapted to a specific shape, depending on the characteristics of the wound healing treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2019
Keywords
3D printing, Alginate, Bagasse, Biomaterials, Nanocellulose, Scaffolds, Calcium compounds, Cell culture, Cellulose, Scaffolds (biology), 3-D printing, Agro-industrial residue, Cellulose nanofibrils, Dimensional changes, Fractionation process, Potential resources, Sugar-cane bagasse, Wound-healing treatment, 3D printers
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-38888 (URN)10.1016/j.addma.2019.05.014 (DOI)2-s2.0-85065648577 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Universidad Nacional de Asunción; Funding details: Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas; Funding details: Norges Forskningsråd, 271054; Funding text 1: This work has been funded by the ValBio-3D project (Grant ELAC2015/T03-0715 Valorization of residual biomass for advanced 3D materials; Research Council of Norway , Grant no. 271054). The authors acknowledge the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) and the Universidad Nacional de Misiones (Argentina) for the financial support. Thanks to Mirjana Filipovic, Ingebjørg Leirset and Anne Marie Reitan (RISE PFI) for laboratory analyses.

Available from: 2019-06-03 Created: 2019-06-03 Last updated: 2019-06-03Bibliographically approved
Jack, A. A., Nordli, H. R., Powell, L. C., Farnell, D. J., Pukstad, B., Rye, P. D., . . . Hill, K. E. (2019). Cellulose Nanofibril Formulations Incorporating a Low-Molecular-Weight Alginate Oligosaccharide Modify Bacterial Biofilm Development.. Biomacromolecules
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cellulose Nanofibril Formulations Incorporating a Low-Molecular-Weight Alginate Oligosaccharide Modify Bacterial Biofilm Development.
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2019 (English)In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) from wood pulp are a renewable material possessing advantages for biomedical applications because of their customizable porosity, mechanical strength, translucency, and environmental biodegradability. Here, we investigated the growth of multispecies wound biofilms on CNF formulated as aerogels and films incorporating the low-molecular-weight alginate oligosaccharide OligoG CF-5/20 to evaluate their structural and antimicrobial properties. Overnight microbial cultures were adjusted to 2.8 × 109 colony-forming units (cfu) mL-1 in Mueller Hinton broth and growth rates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Staphylococcus aureus 1061A monitored for 24 h in CNF dispersions sterilized by γ-irradiation. Two CNF formulations were prepared (20 g m-2) with CNF as air-dried films or freeze-dried aerogels, with or without incorporation of an antimicrobial alginate oligosaccharide (OligoG CF-5/20) as a surface coating or bionanocomposite, respectively. The materials were structurally characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser profilometry (LP). The antimicrobial properties of the formulations were assessed using single- and mixed-species biofilms grown on the materials and analyzed using LIVE/DEAD staining with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and COMSTAT software. OligoG-CNF suspensions significantly decreased the growth of both bacterial strains at OligoG concentrations >2.58% (P < 0.05). SEM showed that aerogel-OligoG bionanocomposite formulations had a more open three-dimensional structure, whereas LP showed that film formulations coated with OligoG were significantly smoother than untreated films or films incorporating PEG400 as a plasticizer (P < 0.05). CLSM of biofilms grown on films incorporating OligoG demonstrated altered biofilm architecture, with reduced biomass and decreased cell viability. The OligoG-CNF formulations as aerogels or films both inhibited pyocyanin production (P < 0.05). These novel CNF formulations or bionanocomposites were able to modify bacterial growth, biofilm development, and virulence factor production in vitro. These data support the potential of OligoG and CNF bionanocomposites for use in biomedical applications where prevention of infection or biofilm growth is required.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-39720 (URN)10.1021/acs.biomac.9b00522 (DOI)31251598 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
Ottesen, V., Larsson, P. T., Chinga-Carrasco, G., Syverud, K. & Gregersen, Ö. (2019). Mechanical properties of cellulose nanofibril films: effects of crystallinity and its modification by treatment with liquid anhydrous ammonia. Cellulose (London), 26(11), 6615-27
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mechanical properties of cellulose nanofibril films: effects of crystallinity and its modification by treatment with liquid anhydrous ammonia
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2019 (English)In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 26, no 11, p. 6615-27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The influence of cellulose crystallinity on mechanical properties of cellulose nano-fibrils (CNF) was investigated. Degree of crystallinity (DoC) was modified using liquid anhydrous ammonia. Such treatment changes crystal allomorph from cellulose I to cellulose III, a change which was reversed by subsequent boiling in water. DoC was measured using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Crystalline index (CI) was also measured using wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). Cotton linters were used as the raw material. The cotton linter was ammonia treated prior to fibrillation. Reduced DoC is seen to associate with an increased yield point and decreased Young modulus. Young modulus is here defined as the maximal slope of the stress–strain curves. The association between DoC and Young modulus or DoC and yield point are both statistically significant. We cannot conclude there has been an effect on strainability. While mechanical properties were affected, we found no indication that ammonia treatment affected degree of fibrillation. CNF was also studied in air and liquid using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Swelling of the nanofibers was observed, with a mean diameter increase of 48.9%.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2019
Keywords
Cellulose nanofibrils, Degree of crystallinity, Mechanical properties, Swelling, Ammonia, Atomic force microscopy, Cellulose, Cellulose films, Chromium compounds, Cotton, Crystallinity, Liquids, Nanofibers, Nuclear magnetic resonance, X ray scattering, Ammonia treatment, Anhydrous ammonia, Cellulose crystallinity, Cotton linters, Crystalline index, Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-39277 (URN)10.1007/s10570-019-02546-2 (DOI)2-s2.0-85067190175 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-03 Created: 2019-07-03 Last updated: 2019-07-03Bibliographically approved
Espinosa, E., Filgueira, D., Rodríguez, A. & Chinga-Carrasco, G. (2019). Nanocellulose-Based Inks-Effect of Alginate Content on the Water Absorption of 3D Printed Constructs.. Bioengineering (Basel, Switzerland), 6(3), Article ID E65.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nanocellulose-Based Inks-Effect of Alginate Content on the Water Absorption of 3D Printed Constructs.
2019 (English)In: Bioengineering (Basel, Switzerland), ISSN 2306-5354, Vol. 6, no 3, article id E65Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

2,2,6,6-tetramethylpyperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) were used as ink for three-dimensional (3D) printing of porous structures with potential as wound dressings. Alginate (10, 20, 30 and 40 wt%) was incorporated into the formulation to facilitate the ionic cross-linking with calcium chloride (CaCl2). The effect of two different concentrations of CaCl2 (50 and 100 mM) was studied. The 3D printed hydrogels were freeze-dried to produce aerogels which were tested for water absorption. Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) pictures demonstrated that the higher the concentration of the cross-linker the higher the definition of the printed tracks. CNF-based aerogels showed a remarkable water absorption capability. Although the incorporation of alginate and the cross-linking with CaCl2 led to shrinkage of the 3D printed constructs, the approach yielded suitable porous structures for water and moisture absorption. It is concluded that the 3D printed biocomposite structures developed in this study have characteristics that are promising for wound dressings devices.

Keywords
3D printing, absorption, nanocellulose, wound dressings
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-39712 (URN)10.3390/bioengineering6030065 (DOI)31366050 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
Heggset, E. B., Strand, B. L., Sundby, K. W., Simon, S., Chinga-Carrasco, G. & Syverud, K. (2019). Viscoelastic properties of nanocellulose based inks for 3D printing and mechanical properties of CNF/alginate biocomposite gels. Cellulose (London) (1), 581-595
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Viscoelastic properties of nanocellulose based inks for 3D printing and mechanical properties of CNF/alginate biocomposite gels
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2019 (English)In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, no 1, p. 581-595Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Inks for 3D printing based on cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) or mixtures of CNFs and either cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) or alginate were assessed by determining their viscoelastic properties i.e. complex viscosity and storage and loss moduli (G′ and G″). Two types of alginates were used, i.e. from Laminaria hyperborea stipe and Macrocystis pyrifera. Shape fidelity of 3D printed grids were qualitatively evaluated and compared to the viscoelastic properties of the inks. The biocomposite gels containing alginate were post stabilized by crosslinking with Ca2+. Mechanical properties of the crosslinked biocomposite gels were assessed. The complex viscosity, G′ and G″ of CNF suspensions increased when the solid content was increased from 3.5 to 4.0 wt%, but levelled off by further increase in CNF solid content. The complex viscosity at low angular frequency at 4 wt% was as high as 104 Pa·s. This seemed to be the necessary viscosity level for obtaining good shape fidelity of the printed structures for the studied systems. By replacing part of the CNFs with CNCs, the complex viscosity, G′ and G″ were reduced and so was also the shape fidelity of the printed grids. The changes in complex viscosity and moduli when CNFs was replaced with alginate depended on the relative amounts of CNFs/alginate. The type of alginate (from either L. hyp. stipe or M. pyr.) did not play a role for the viscoelastic properties of the inks, nor for the printed grids before post stabilization. Replacing CNFs with up to 1.5 wt% alginate gave satisfactory shape fidelity. The effect of adding alginate and subsequent crosslinking with Ca2+, strongly affected the strength properties of the gels. By appropriate choice of relative amounts of CNFs and alginate and type of alginate, the Young’s modulus and rupture strength could be controlled within the range of 30–150 kPa and 1.5–6 kg, respectively. The deformation at rupture was around 55%. The alginate from L. hyp. stipe yields higher Young’s modulus and lower syneresis compared to M. pyr. This shows that the choice of alginate plays a significant role for the mechanical properties of the final product, although it does not influence on the viscoelastic properties of the ink. The choice of alginate should be L. hyp. stipe if high strength is desired.

Keywords
Alginate, Cellulose, Cellulose derivatives, Composite materials, Hydrogels, Mechanical properties, Nanocellulose, Rheology, Suspensions, Viscoelasticity, Viscosity, 3-D printing
National Category
Nano Technology Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-36660 (URN)10.1007/s10570-018-2142-3 (DOI)2-s2.0-85057032463 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2019-03-06Bibliographically approved
Syrový, T., Maronová, S., Kuberský, P., Ehman, N., Vallejos, M., Pretl, S., . . . Chinga-Carrasco, G. (2019). Wide range humidity sensors printed on biocomposite films of cellulose nanofibril and poly(ethylene glycol). Journal of Applied Polymer Science, Article ID 47920.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wide range humidity sensors printed on biocomposite films of cellulose nanofibril and poly(ethylene glycol)
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, article id 47920Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cellulose nanofibril (CNF) films were prepared from side streams generated by the sugarcane industry, that is, bagasse. Two fractionation processes were utilized for comparison purposes: (1) soda and (2) hot water and soda pretreatments. 2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxyl-mediated oxidation was applied to facilitate the nanofibrillation of the bagasse fibers. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was chosen as plasticizer to improve the ductility of CNF films. The neat CNF and biocomposite films (CNF and 40% PEG) were used for fabrication of self-standing humidity sensors. CNF-based humidity sensors exhibited high change of impedance, within four orders of magnitude, in response to relative humidity (RH) from 20 to 90%. The use of plasticizer had an impact on sensor kinetics. While the biocomposite film sensors showed slightly longer response time, the recovery time of these plasticized sensors was two times shorter in comparison to sensors without PEG. This study demonstrated that agroindustrial side streams can form the basis for high-end applications such as humidity sensors, with potential for, for example, packaging and wound dressing applications. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley and Sons Inc., 2019
Keywords
biocomposites, biomass, fractionation, humidity sensors, nanocellulose, Bagasse, Cellulose, Ethylene glycol, Nanofibers, Plasticizers, Polyethylene glycols, Polyols, Reinforced plastics, Bio-composites, Biocomposite films, Fractionation process, Nano fibrillations, Orders of magnitude, Pre-treatments, Self standings, Wound dressings, Cellulose films
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-38927 (URN)10.1002/app.47920 (DOI)2-s2.0-85065491414 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-28 Created: 2019-05-28 Last updated: 2019-05-28Bibliographically approved
Filgueira, D., Holmen, S., Melbø, J. K., Moldes, D., Echtermeyer, A. T. & Chinga-Carrasco, G. (2018). 3D printable filaments made of biobased polyethylene biocomposites. Polymers, 10(3), Article ID 314.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>3D printable filaments made of biobased polyethylene biocomposites
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2018 (English)In: Polymers, ISSN 2073-4360, E-ISSN 2073-4360, Vol. 10, no 3, article id 314Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Two different series of biobased polyethylene (BioPE) were used for the manufacturing of biocomposites, complemented with thermomechanical pulp (TMP) fibers. The intrinsic hydrophilic character of the TMP fibers was previously modified by grafting hydrophobic compounds (octyl gallate and lauryl gallate) by means of an enzymatic-assisted treatment. BioPE with low melt flow index (MFI) yielded filaments with low void fraction and relatively low thickness variation. The water absorption of the biocomposites was remarkably improved when the enzymatically-hydrophobized TMP fibers were used. Importantly, the 3D printing of BioPE was improved by adding 10% and 20% TMP fibers to the composition. Thus, 3D printable biocomposites with low water uptake can be manufactured by using fully biobased materials and environmentally-friendly processes.

Keywords
3D printing, Biocomposites, BioPE, Grafting, Laccase, Lauryl gallate, Octyl gallate, TMP, Composite materials, Fibers, Grafting (chemical), Hydrophobicity, Polyethylenes, Thermomechanical pulp, Thermomechanical pulping process, Void fraction, Water absorption, 3-D printing, Bio-composites, Laccases, 3D printers
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-33507 (URN)10.3390/polym10030314 (DOI)2-s2.0-85043719493 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-23 Created: 2018-03-23 Last updated: 2018-08-14Bibliographically approved
Tarrés, Q., Melbø, J. K., Delgado-Aguilar, M., Espinach, F. X., Mutjé, P. & Chinga-Carrasco, G. (2018). Bio-polyethylene reinforced with thermomechanical pulp fibers: Mechanical and micromechanical characterization and its application in 3D-printing by fused deposition modelling. Composites Part B: Engineering, 153, 70-77
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bio-polyethylene reinforced with thermomechanical pulp fibers: Mechanical and micromechanical characterization and its application in 3D-printing by fused deposition modelling
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2018 (English)In: Composites Part B: Engineering, ISSN 1359-8368, E-ISSN 1879-1069, Vol. 153, p. 70-77Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Two biobased polyethylenes (BioPE) and thermomechanical pulp (TMP) fibers were used to produce biocomposites. The impact of TMP fibers on the mechanical properties was assessed in detail. An increase on the viscosity of the melted biocomposites was quantified and was related to the incorporation of the TMP fibers (0–30% w/w). The impact of polyethylene functionalized with maleic anhydride (MAPE) on the mechanical properties was quantified. Compared to neat BioPEs, a maximum increase of tensile strength between 115 and 127% was obtained, for the biocomposites containing 6% w/w of MAPE and 30% w/w TMP fibers. The formulated biocomposites containing 10 and 20% TMP fibers were three-dimensional (3D) printed, by fused deposition modelling. We confirmed that TMP fibers facilitated the 3D printing and correspondingly improved the mechanical properties of the biocomposite materials.

Keywords
3D printing, Biocomposites, Biopolyethylene, Mechanical properties, Natural fibers, 3D printers, Deposition, Polyethylenes, Reinforced plastics, Tensile strength, Thermomechanical pulp, Three dimensional computer graphics, 3-D printing, Bio-composites, Biocomposite materials, Fused deposition modelling, ITS applications, Micromechanical characterization, Threedimensional (3-d), Thermomechanical pulping process, Impact, Increments, Polyethylene, Thermomechanical Pulps
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-34572 (URN)10.1016/j.compositesb.2018.07.009 (DOI)2-s2.0-85050243089 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: PFI, Population Foundation of India; Funding details: FP1405, COST, European Cooperation in Science and Technology; Funding details: 245270, Norges Forskningsråd; Funding details: 271054, Norges Forskningsråd;

Available from: 2018-08-14 Created: 2018-08-14 Last updated: 2019-03-06Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6183-2017

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