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Publications (10 of 21) Show all publications
Burden, H., Haraldson, S., Karlsson, M., Mellegård, N. & Olsson, E. (2019). Accelerating Acquisition in an Open Innovation Ecosystem. In: Proc of Twenty-fifth Americas Conference on Information Systems: . Paper presented at Twenty-fifth Americas Conference on Information Systems, Cancun, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accelerating Acquisition in an Open Innovation Ecosystem
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2019 (English)In: Proc of Twenty-fifth Americas Conference on Information Systems, 2019Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Maritime transports are to be regarded as a self-organized ecosystem (Kay et al., 1999) characterized by sub-optimization where historically each actor to has optimized its own operations, often giving rise to inefficiencies as a whole. In recent years however, digital transformation has challenged this by providing means for enhanced transparency in data sharing and situational awareness, enabling better coordination and improved efficiency on the whole (Lind et al. 2018a). Digital transformation drives the possibilities of creating new value by enabling higher degrees of connectivity between actors, digitally twin physical objects, drawing patterns of behaviour based on extensive sets of historical data, as well as harmonizing data sharing through standardized interfaces and communication protocols (e.g. Almirall and Casadesus-Masanell 2010; Gassman et al. 2010; Lakhani et al. 2006). To break existing patterns of behaviour and to avoid the creation of proprietary solutions that feed sub-optimization, there is a need for new inspiration and perspectives that capitalize on the opportunities that digital transformation provides. From an open innovation point of view, this means that innovators both having experience from the sector as well as from other sectors would come together, come up with, and provide new applications not previously possible or never thought about before. A core capability that the ecosystem needs to develop and ensure is data streams made accessible for those that can provide new applications aimed for the single actor and/or clusters of actors, within or outside the maritime sector (Lind et al. 2018).This has also been one of the objectives for Port Collaborative Decision Making (PortCDM), which is a concept that provides guidelines and standards for the data exchange within and between ports, between ships and ports, and between ports and hinterland operators (Lind et al 2018). Such data exchange is necessary if enhanced efficiency during port call operations is to be achieved but also facilitates open 

innovation within the maritime sector. In order to realise that potential, a purposive transfer of knowledge between the established actors and potential new service providers has to be established (Chesbrough 2006). We therefore set out to explore How can open innovation intermediaries accelerate acquisition in an ecosystem through the management and throughput of knowledge transfer?We address the question through a longitudinal study by applying an action research approach involving actors from the local port and students from three bachelor programs. Before we describe the specifics of the research methodology, we outline our theoretical framework in terms of how knowledge transfer can be framed within an open innovation ecosystem. After the research methodology we detail the five iterations and then discuss the effect on knowledge transfer within the ecosystem. Finally, we conclude and give directions on future research.

Keywords
Maritime ITS, Coupled innovation, Student-industry collaboration, Open innovation intermediaries
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-40377 (URN)
Conference
Twenty-fifth Americas Conference on Information Systems, Cancun, 2019
Available from: 2019-10-09 Created: 2019-10-09 Last updated: 2020-01-10
Burden, H., Steghöfer, J.-P. & Hagvall Svensson, O. (2019). Facilitating Entrepreneurial Experiences through a Software Engineering Project Course. In: 2019 IEEE/ACM 41st International Conference on Software Engineering: Software Engineering Education andTraining (ICSE-SEET): . Paper presented at 41st International Conference on Software Engineering, Software Engineering Education Track (pp. 28-37). IEEE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Facilitating Entrepreneurial Experiences through a Software Engineering Project Course
2019 (English)In: 2019 IEEE/ACM 41st International Conference on Software Engineering: Software Engineering Education andTraining (ICSE-SEET), IEEE , 2019, p. 28-37Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Skills and competencies in entrepreneurship, suchas the ability to generate innovative ideas and the courage toengage with stakeholders and society, have gained importance inengineering curricula. In this case study paper, we report on howwe have integrated entrepreneurial experiences into a softwareengineering project course and made the creation of value andreflection on the application of a structured process the heart andsoul of the course. Based on current research on entrepreneurshipeducation as well as the definition of entrepreneurial competenciesused by the European Union, we show how the learningobjectives, the teaching moments, the integration of externalstakeholders, and the assessment work together to create anentrepreneurial environment in which students are encouragedand rewarded to work in an entrepreneurial way. Based on datafrom reflection reports, course evaluations, and interviews wediscuss the pros and cons of our approach and how the studentperception and expectations often run counter to the motivationsof the course design. We thus contribute guidance for otherteachers based on our own experiences in relation to the findingsof our peers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE, 2019
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-40210 (URN)10.1109/ICSE-SEET.2019.00012 (DOI)978-1-7281-1000-4 (ISBN)
Conference
41st International Conference on Software Engineering, Software Engineering Education Track
Available from: 2020-01-14 Created: 2020-01-14 Last updated: 2020-01-20Bibliographically approved
Burden, H. & Sprei, F. (2019). Integrating Entrepreneurial Experiences with Sustainable Development Education. In: : . Paper presented at Accelerating the Implementation of Sustainable Development in the Curriculum.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrating Entrepreneurial Experiences with Sustainable Development Education
2019 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to address the challenge of teaching sustainable development to computer engineering students. Part of the problem is that they perceive the topic as irrelevant for their future profession. The chosen approach was to introduce a project element into a course on sustainable development where the students developed applications for sustainable mobility together with the local public transport authority, an academic institution and a multinational telecom company. Thus the course project was organized to facilitate entrepreneurial experiences, as defined in the EU's EntreComp model, as well as relating theoretical concepts to experiences in a concrete context. The students were then asked to analyze and reflect upon their design choices and approaches in relation to sustainable development and ethical considerations. The findings conclude that the course changes improved the overall student satisfaction while succeeding in anchoring sustainable development in a context the students could relate to. The collaboration was also perceived as fruitful by the external stakeholders who encouraged the students to stay in touch for their bachelor theses and internships. The theoretical implication is a first attempt in integrating sustainable development education with entrepreneurial experiences while the practical implication is a description of how the integration can be realized. The contribution is therefor of value for both educational researchers by opening novel research opportunities and teachers by describing new possibilities for sustainable development education.

National Category
Computer Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-40212 (URN)
Conference
Accelerating the Implementation of Sustainable Development in the Curriculum
Available from: 2020-01-09 Created: 2020-01-09 Last updated: 2020-01-20Bibliographically approved
Burden, H. & Ohlin, G. (2019). Real-life Observations from Full Electric City Buses Utilising the Information Technology for Public Transport Specification. In: : . Paper presented at UITP. 9-12 June 2019. Stockholm, Sweden..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Real-life Observations from Full Electric City Buses Utilising the Information Technology for Public Transport Specification
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-40214 (URN)
Conference
UITP. 9-12 June 2019. Stockholm, Sweden.
Projects
RIVSILOn
Note

Poster presented at UITP Global Public Transport Summit

Available from: 2020-01-09 Created: 2020-01-09 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
Burden, H. & Steghöfer, J.-P. (2019). Teaching and Fostering Reflection in Software Engineering Project Courses. In: Parsons, David; MacCallum, Kathryn (Ed.), Agile and Lean Concepts for Teaching and Learning: Bringing Methodologies from Industry to the Classroom (pp. 231-262). Springer Singapore
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teaching and Fostering Reflection in Software Engineering Project Courses
2019 (English)In: Agile and Lean Concepts for Teaching and Learning: Bringing Methodologies from Industry to the Classroom / [ed] Parsons, David; MacCallum, Kathryn, Springer Singapore , 2019, p. 231-262Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Re ection is an important part of agile software processes as witnessed, e.g., by the Sprint Retrospectives in Scrum or by the various learning feedback loops in XP. Engineering education also emphasises the importance of re ective practice, e.g., in Kolb's learning cycle and Schon's re ection-in/on-action. Our contribution in this chapter is a toolkit for re ective practice that shows how re ection can be used by software engineering students for two purposes: to re ect on the application of a software process and to re ect on their learning process. In order to help students understand the purpose of re ection and how to approach re ection, we follow a cognitive apprenticeship approach in which the teachers re ect about the events in the course, their own goals, and how they are aligned with the teaching. Students are asked to re-

ect during supervisions and as part of their written assignments from the very beginning of the course. We thus combine a meta-cognitive approach where re ection is taught as a learning strategy with a common software engineering practice of continuous improvement through re ection. We evaluate the re ective model and a course design based on it through the student, teacher, and theoretical lenses based on empirical data.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Singapore, 2019
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-40209 (URN)
Available from: 2020-01-14 Created: 2020-01-14 Last updated: 2020-01-27Bibliographically approved
Aramrattana, M., Andersson, A., Reichenberg, F., Mellegård, N. & Burden, H. (2019). Testing cooperative intelligent transport systems in distributed simulators. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 65, 206-216
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Testing cooperative intelligent transport systems in distributed simulators
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2019 (English)In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517, Vol. 65, p. 206-216Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Simulation is often used as a technique to test and evaluate systems, as it provides a cost-efficient and safe alternative for testing and evaluation. A combination of simulators can be used to create high-fidelity and realistic test scenarios, especially when the systems-under-test are complex. An example of such complex systems is Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems (C-ITS), which include many actors that are connected to each other via wireless communication in order to interact and cooperate. The majority of the actors in the systems are vehicles equipped with wireless communication modules, which can range from fully autonomous vehicles to manually driven vehicles. In order to test and evaluate C-ITS, this paper presents a distributed simulation framework that consists of (a) a moving base driving simulator; (b) a real-time vehicle simulator; and (c) network and traffic simulators. We present our approach for connecting and co-simulating the simulators. We report on limitation and performance that this simulation framework can achieve. Lastly, we discuss potential benefits and feasibility of using the simulation framework for testing of C-ITS. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Cooperative intelligent transportation systems, Hardware-in-the-loop, Moving base driving simulator, Network simulator, Traffic simulator, Automobile simulators, Complex networks, Cooperative communication, Intelligent systems, Traffic control, Vehicle actuated signals, Vehicle to vehicle communications, Vehicles, Driving simulator, Hard-ware-in-the-loop, Intelligent transportation systems, Network simulators, Traffic simulators, Intelligent vehicle highway systems
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-39792 (URN)10.1016/j.trf.2019.07.020 (DOI)2-s2.0-85070355325 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: VINNOVA, 2015-04881; Funding text 1: Research leading to these results has received funding by the Swedish government agency for innovation systems ( VINNOVA ) in the NGEA step 2 project (ref 2015-04881 ). The authors would also like to acknowledge the support from Lindholmen Science Park for hosting the VICTA Lab. Last but not least, the authors would like to acknowledge School of Information Technology at Halmstad University for supporting the work.

Available from: 2019-08-19 Created: 2019-08-19 Last updated: 2019-08-19Bibliographically approved
Burden, H. (2019). Transitioning from Teaching Canonical Engineering to Sustainable Development. In: : . Paper presented at Accelerating the Implementation of Sustainable Development in the Curriculum.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transitioning from Teaching Canonical Engineering to Sustainable Development
2019 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
National Category
Computer Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-40211 (URN)
Conference
Accelerating the Implementation of Sustainable Development in the Curriculum
Note

To be published in a special issue of the International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education

Available from: 2020-01-09 Created: 2020-01-09 Last updated: 2020-01-10Bibliographically approved
Mellegård, N., Burden, H., Levin, D., Lind, K. & Magazinius, A. (2018). Contrasting Big Bang with Continuous Integration Through Defect Reports. IEEE Software
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contrasting Big Bang with Continuous Integration Through Defect Reports
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2018 (English)In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Continuous integration promises earlier defect detection, quality improvements and more customer value delivered faster. But what evidence is there? In this longitudinal case study we examined the development of software for the advanced safety and driver support component of a Swedish vehicle manufacturer in two consecutive projects, where the first was developed in a big bang fashion, typical to a traditional waterfall process, while the second project utilized continuous integration. By contrasting the two projects, we evaluated the introduction of continuous integration and supplement earlier claims based on interview studies with a quantitative analysis of defect reports.

Keywords
Software, Production, Companies, Automobiles, Software engineering, Interviews, Software Engineering Process, Process measurement, Process metrics
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-36623 (URN)10.1109/MS.2018.2880822 (DOI)2-s2.0-85058619852 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Next Generation Electical Architecure step 2 (NGEA2)
Funder
Vinnova, 2015-04881
Available from: 2018-12-13 Created: 2018-12-13 Last updated: 2020-02-04Bibliographically approved
Steghöfer, J.-P., Burden, H., Hebig, R., Calikli, G., Feldt, R., Hammouda, I., . . . Liebel, G. (2018). Involving External Stakeholders in Project Courses. ACM Transactions on Computing Education, 18(2), Article ID 8.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Involving External Stakeholders in Project Courses
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2018 (English)In: ACM Transactions on Computing Education, ISSN 1946-6226, E-ISSN 1946-6226, Vol. 18, no 2, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Problem: The involvement of external stakeholders in capstone projects and project courses is desirable dueto its potential positive effects on the students. Capstone projects particularly profit from the inclusion ofan industrial partner to make the project relevant and help students acquire professional skills. In addition,an increasing push towards education that is aligned with industry and incorporates industrial partners canbe observed. However, the involvement of external stakeholders in teaching moments can create friction andcould, in the worst case, lead to frustration of all involved parties.Contribution: We developed a model that allows analysing the involvement of external stakeholders inuniversity courses both in a retrospective fashion, to gain insights from past course instances, and in aconstructive fashion, to plan the involvement of external stakeholders.Key Concepts: The conceptual model and the accompanying guideline guide the teachers in their analysisof stakeholder involvement. The model is comprised of several activities (define, execute, and evaluate thecollaboration). The guideline provides questions that the teachers should answer for each of these activities.In the constructive use, the model allows teachers to define an action plan based on an analysis of potentialstakeholders and the pedagogical objectives. In the retrospective use, the model allows teachers to identifyissues that appeared during the project and their underlying causes. Drawing from ideas of the reflectivepractitioner, the model contains an emphasis on reflection and interpretation of the observations made bythe teacher and other groups involved in the courses.Key Lessons: Applying the model retrospectively to a total of eight courses shows that it is possible toreveal hitherto implicit risks and assumptions and to gain a better insight into the interaction betweenexternal stakeholders and students. Our empirical data reveals seven recurring risk themes that categorisethe different risks appearing in the analysed courses. These themes can also be used to categorise mitigationstrategies to address these risks pro-actively. Additionally, aspects not related to external stakeholders, e.g.,about the interaction of the project with other courses in the study program, have been revealed. Theconstructive use of the model for one course has proved helpful in identifying action alternatives and finallydeciding to not include external stakeholders in the project due to the perceived cost-benefit-ratio.Implications to practice: Our evaluation shows that the model is viable and a useful tool that allowsteachers to reason about and plan the involvement of external stakeholders in a variety of course settings,and in particular in capstone projects.

Keywords
Capstone Projects, External Stakeholders, Social and professional topics, Computing education, Project and people management
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-36476 (URN)10.1145/3152098 (DOI)2-s2.0-85064555163 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-22 Created: 2018-11-22 Last updated: 2019-05-10Bibliographically approved
Aramrattana, M., Andersson, A., Burden, H., Reichenberg, F. & Mellegård, N. (2018). Testing Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems in Driving Simulators. In: : . Paper presented at 17th Driving Simulation & Virtual Reality Conference & Exhibition, DSC 2018},.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Testing Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems in Driving Simulators
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2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Cooperative IntelligentTransport Systems include many actors in the transport system that are con-nected to each other via wireless communication in order to interact andcooperate. Majority of the actors in thesystems are vehicles, which can range from fully autonomous vehicles tomanually driven vehicles, equipped withwireless communication modules. Creating realistic scenarios for testing suchcomplex systems often need a com-bination of simulators. This paper presents a distributed simulation frameworkthat consists of a) a moving basedriving simulator; b) a real-time hardware-in-the-loop simulator; and c) anetwork simulator and traffic simulator. Wepresent our approach for connecting and co-simulating the mentioned simulators.As a first test of our simulationframework, a crossing scenario is simulated. Lastly, we discuss potentialbenefits and future work.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-37584 (URN)
Conference
17th Driving Simulation & Virtual Reality Conference & Exhibition, DSC 2018},
Available from: 2019-01-25 Created: 2019-01-25 Last updated: 2019-01-25Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1811-0123

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