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Publications (10 of 12) Show all publications
Aramrattana, M., Andersson, A., Reichenberg, F., Mellegård, N. & Burden, H. (2019). Testing cooperative intelligent transport systems in distributed simulators. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 65, 206-216
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Testing cooperative intelligent transport systems in distributed simulators
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2019 (English)In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517, Vol. 65, p. 206-216Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Simulation is often used as a technique to test and evaluate systems, as it provides a cost-efficient and safe alternative for testing and evaluation. A combination of simulators can be used to create high-fidelity and realistic test scenarios, especially when the systems-under-test are complex. An example of such complex systems is Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems (C-ITS), which include many actors that are connected to each other via wireless communication in order to interact and cooperate. The majority of the actors in the systems are vehicles equipped with wireless communication modules, which can range from fully autonomous vehicles to manually driven vehicles. In order to test and evaluate C-ITS, this paper presents a distributed simulation framework that consists of (a) a moving base driving simulator; (b) a real-time vehicle simulator; and (c) network and traffic simulators. We present our approach for connecting and co-simulating the simulators. We report on limitation and performance that this simulation framework can achieve. Lastly, we discuss potential benefits and feasibility of using the simulation framework for testing of C-ITS. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Cooperative intelligent transportation systems, Hardware-in-the-loop, Moving base driving simulator, Network simulator, Traffic simulator, Automobile simulators, Complex networks, Cooperative communication, Intelligent systems, Traffic control, Vehicle actuated signals, Vehicle to vehicle communications, Vehicles, Driving simulator, Hard-ware-in-the-loop, Intelligent transportation systems, Network simulators, Traffic simulators, Intelligent vehicle highway systems
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-39792 (URN)10.1016/j.trf.2019.07.020 (DOI)2-s2.0-85070355325 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: VINNOVA, 2015-04881; Funding text 1: Research leading to these results has received funding by the Swedish government agency for innovation systems ( VINNOVA ) in the NGEA step 2 project (ref 2015-04881 ). The authors would also like to acknowledge the support from Lindholmen Science Park for hosting the VICTA Lab. Last but not least, the authors would like to acknowledge School of Information Technology at Halmstad University for supporting the work.

Available from: 2019-08-19 Created: 2019-08-19 Last updated: 2019-08-19Bibliographically approved
Mellegård, N., Burden, H., Levin, D., Lind, K. & Magazinius, A. (2018). Contrasting Big Bang with Continuous Integration Through Defect Reports. IEEE Software
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contrasting Big Bang with Continuous Integration Through Defect Reports
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2018 (English)In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Continuous integration promises earlier defect detection, quality improvements and more customer value delivered faster. But what evidence is there? In this longitudinal case study we examined the development of software for the advanced safety and driver support component of a Swedish vehicle manufacturer in two consecutive projects, where the first was developed in a big bang fashion, typical to a traditional waterfall process, while the second project utilized continuous integration. By contrasting the two projects, we evaluated the introduction of continuous integration and supplement earlier claims based on interview studies with a quantitative analysis of defect reports.

Keywords
Software, Production, Companies, Automobiles, Software engineering, Interviews, Software Engineering Process, Process measurement, Process metrics
National Category
Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-36623 (URN)10.1109/MS.2018.2880822 (DOI)
Projects
Next Generation Electical Architecure step 2 (NGEA2)
Funder
VINNOVA, 2015-04881
Available from: 2018-12-13 Created: 2018-12-13 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Steghöfer, J.-P., Burden, H., Hebig, R., Calikli, G., Feldt, R., Hammouda, I., . . . Liebel, G. (2018). Involving External Stakeholders in Project Courses. ACM Transactions on Computing Education, 18(2), Article ID 8.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Involving External Stakeholders in Project Courses
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2018 (English)In: ACM Transactions on Computing Education, ISSN 1946-6226, E-ISSN 1946-6226, Vol. 18, no 2, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Problem: The involvement of external stakeholders in capstone projects and project courses is desirable dueto its potential positive effects on the students. Capstone projects particularly profit from the inclusion ofan industrial partner to make the project relevant and help students acquire professional skills. In addition,an increasing push towards education that is aligned with industry and incorporates industrial partners canbe observed. However, the involvement of external stakeholders in teaching moments can create friction andcould, in the worst case, lead to frustration of all involved parties.Contribution: We developed a model that allows analysing the involvement of external stakeholders inuniversity courses both in a retrospective fashion, to gain insights from past course instances, and in aconstructive fashion, to plan the involvement of external stakeholders.Key Concepts: The conceptual model and the accompanying guideline guide the teachers in their analysisof stakeholder involvement. The model is comprised of several activities (define, execute, and evaluate thecollaboration). The guideline provides questions that the teachers should answer for each of these activities.In the constructive use, the model allows teachers to define an action plan based on an analysis of potentialstakeholders and the pedagogical objectives. In the retrospective use, the model allows teachers to identifyissues that appeared during the project and their underlying causes. Drawing from ideas of the reflectivepractitioner, the model contains an emphasis on reflection and interpretation of the observations made bythe teacher and other groups involved in the courses.Key Lessons: Applying the model retrospectively to a total of eight courses shows that it is possible toreveal hitherto implicit risks and assumptions and to gain a better insight into the interaction betweenexternal stakeholders and students. Our empirical data reveals seven recurring risk themes that categorisethe different risks appearing in the analysed courses. These themes can also be used to categorise mitigationstrategies to address these risks pro-actively. Additionally, aspects not related to external stakeholders, e.g.,about the interaction of the project with other courses in the study program, have been revealed. Theconstructive use of the model for one course has proved helpful in identifying action alternatives and finallydeciding to not include external stakeholders in the project due to the perceived cost-benefit-ratio.Implications to practice: Our evaluation shows that the model is viable and a useful tool that allowsteachers to reason about and plan the involvement of external stakeholders in a variety of course settings,and in particular in capstone projects.

Keywords
Capstone Projects, External Stakeholders, Social and professional topics, Computing education, Project and people management
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-36476 (URN)10.1145/3152098 (DOI)2-s2.0-85064555163 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-22 Created: 2018-11-22 Last updated: 2019-05-10Bibliographically approved
Aramrattana, M., Andersson, A., Burden, H., Reichenberg, F. & Mellegård, N. (2018). Testing Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems in Driving Simulators. In: : . Paper presented at 17th Driving Simulation & Virtual Reality Conference & Exhibition, DSC 2018},.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Testing Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems in Driving Simulators
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2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Cooperative IntelligentTransport Systems include many actors in the transport system that are con-nected to each other via wireless communication in order to interact andcooperate. Majority of the actors in thesystems are vehicles, which can range from fully autonomous vehicles tomanually driven vehicles, equipped withwireless communication modules. Creating realistic scenarios for testing suchcomplex systems often need a com-bination of simulators. This paper presents a distributed simulation frameworkthat consists of a) a moving basedriving simulator; b) a real-time hardware-in-the-loop simulator; and c) anetwork simulator and traffic simulator. Wepresent our approach for connecting and co-simulating the mentioned simulators.As a first test of our simulationframework, a crossing scenario is simulated. Lastly, we discuss potentialbenefits and future work.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-37584 (URN)
Conference
17th Driving Simulation & Virtual Reality Conference & Exhibition, DSC 2018},
Available from: 2019-01-25 Created: 2019-01-25 Last updated: 2019-01-25Bibliographically approved
Whittle, J., Hutchinson, J., Rouncefield, M., Burden, H. & Heldal, R. (2017). A taxonomy of tool-related issues affecting the adoption of model-driven engineering (ed.). Software and Systems Modeling, 16(2), 313-331
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A taxonomy of tool-related issues affecting the adoption of model-driven engineering
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2017 (English)In: Software and Systems Modeling, ISSN 1619-1366, E-ISSN 1619-1374, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 313-331Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although poor tool support is often blamed for the low uptake of model-driven engineering (MDE), recent studies have shown that adoption problems are as likely to be down to social and organizational factors as with tooling issues. This article discusses the impact of tools on MDE adoption and practice and does so while placing tooling within a broader organizational context. The article revisits previous data on MDE use in industry (19 in-depth interviews with MDE practitioners) and reanalyzes that data through the specific lens of MDE tools in an attempt to identify and categorize the issues that users had with the tools they adopted. In addition, the article presents new data: 20 new interviews in two specific companies—and analyzes it through the same lens. A key contribution of the paper is a loose taxonomy of tool-related considerations, based on empirical industry data, which can be used to reflect on the tooling landscape as well as inform future research on MDE tools.

Keywords
Model-driven engineering, Modeling tools, Organizational change
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-31888 (URN)10.1007/s10270-015-0487-8 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-10-24 Created: 2017-10-24 Last updated: 2019-07-02Bibliographically approved
Edholm, H., Lidstrom, M., Steghofer, J.-P. & Burden, H. (2017). Crunch time: The reasons and effects of unpaid overtime in the games industry. In: Proceedings - 2017 IEEE/ACM 39th International Conference on Software Engineering: Software Engineering in Practice Track, ICSE-SEIP 2017. Paper presented at 39th IEEE/ACM International Conference on Software Engineering: Software Engineering in Practice Track, ICSE-SEIP 2017, 20 May 2017 through 28 May 2017 (pp. 43-52).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Crunch time: The reasons and effects of unpaid overtime in the games industry
2017 (English)In: Proceedings - 2017 IEEE/ACM 39th International Conference on Software Engineering: Software Engineering in Practice Track, ICSE-SEIP 2017, 2017, p. 43-52Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The games industry is notorious for its intense work ethics with uncompensated overtime and weekends at the office, also known as crunch or crunch time. Since crunch time is so common within the industry, is it possible that the benefits of crunch time outweigh the disadvantages? By studying postmortems and conducting interviews with employees in the industry, we aim to characterise crunch time and discover its effects on the industry. We provide a classification of crunch, i.e., four types of crunch which all have distinct characteristics and affect the product, employees and schedule in various ways. One of the crunch types stands out from the others by only having positive effects on product and schedule. A characteristic that all of the types have in common is an increase in stress levels amongst the employees. We identify a set of reasons for crunch and show that crunch is less pronounced in game studios where prioritisation of features is a regular practice.

Keywords
Agile development, Games industry, Human factors, Stress, Sustainable pace, Types of crunch, Unpaid overtime, Engineering, Human engineering, Industrial engineering, Stresses, Stress levels, Work ethics, Software engineering
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-30861 (URN)10.1109/ICSE-SEIP.2017.18 (DOI)2-s2.0-85025833031 (Scopus ID)9781538627174 (ISBN)
Conference
39th IEEE/ACM International Conference on Software Engineering: Software Engineering in Practice Track, ICSE-SEIP 2017, 20 May 2017 through 28 May 2017
Available from: 2017-09-07 Created: 2017-09-07 Last updated: 2018-08-14Bibliographically approved
Liebel, G., Burden, H. & Heldal, R. (2017). For free: continuity and change by team teaching. Teaching in Higher Education, 22(1), 62-77
Open this publication in new window or tab >>For free: continuity and change by team teaching
2017 (English)In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 62-77Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Team teaching is advocated in education to offer students multiple explanations to complex concepts and to improve teacher development. However, team teaching is typically associated with high staff cost due to the increased amount of teachers involved. The authors argue that team teaching can be conducted in a cheap way by including novice teaching assistants in the lectures and train them ‘on the job’. Additionally, novice assistants cause reflection on action and prevent a mechanization of the course. The authors use Brookfield’s four lenses to reflect on the application of team teaching in a Swedish undergraduate course on software modeling over three years, involving 3 teachers and collecting evaluation data from close to 400 students. The reflection shows that team teaching can be used as a cost-effective way to introduce novice teachers to a course, while at the same time receiving benefits from their participation in lectures and course development.

Keywords
Co-teaching, course improvement, pair lecturing, teacher training, team teaching
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-29369 (URN)10.1080/13562517.2016.1221811 (DOI)2-s2.0-84983551927 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-05-08 Created: 2017-05-08 Last updated: 2019-02-01Bibliographically approved
Steghöfer, J.-P., Burden, H., Alahyari, H. & Haneberg, D. (2017). No silver brick: Opportunities and limitations of teaching Scrum with Lego workshops. Journal of Systems and Software, 131, 230-247
Open this publication in new window or tab >>No silver brick: Opportunities and limitations of teaching Scrum with Lego workshops
2017 (English)In: Journal of Systems and Software, ISSN 0164-1212, E-ISSN 1873-1228, Vol. 131, p. 230-247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Education in Software Engineering has to both teach technical content such as databases and programming but also organisational skills such as team work and project management. While the former can be evaluated from a product perspective, the latter are usually embedded in a Software Engineering process and need to be assessed and adapted throughout their implementation. The in-action property of processes puts a strain on teachers since we cannot be present throughout the students’ work. To address this challenge we have adopted workshops to teach Scrum by building a Lego city in short sprints to focus on the methodological content. In this way we can be present throughout the process and coach the students. We have applied the exercise in six different courses, across five different educational programmes and observed more than 450 participating students. In this paper, we report on our experiences with this approach, based on quantitative data from the students and qualitative data from both students and teachers. We give recommendations for learning opportunities and best practices and discuss the limitations of these workshops in a classroom setting. We also report on how the students transferred their methodological knowledge to software development projects in an academic setting.

Keywords
Agile software engineering, Scrum, Software engineering education, Engineering education, Human resource management, Project management, Software design, Software engineering, Students, Teaching, Classroom settings, Educational programmes, Learning opportunity, Methodological knowledge, Software development projects, Software engineering process, Education
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-30808 (URN)10.1016/j.jss.2017.06.019 (DOI)2-s2.0-85021138321 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-09-06 Created: 2017-09-06 Last updated: 2018-08-14Bibliographically approved
Smith, G., Hjalmarsson, A. & Burden, H. (2016). Catalyzing knowledge transfer in innovation ecosystems through contests. In: AMCIS 2016: Surfing the IT Innovation Wave - 22nd Americas Conference on Information Systems. Paper presented at 22nd Americas Conference on Information Systems: Surfing the IT Innovation Wave (AMCIS 2016), August 11-14, 2016, San Diego, US.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Catalyzing knowledge transfer in innovation ecosystems through contests
2016 (English)In: AMCIS 2016: Surfing the IT Innovation Wave - 22nd Americas Conference on Information Systems, 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Open innovation practices are gaining traction. Hence, the relevance of measures for engaging and managing heterogeneous groups of distributed complementors is rising. This mixed-method case study defines a pilot demonstration of emergent technology as an innovation ecosystem and utilizes a knowledge transfer lens to explore the impact of an open innovation contest. The contribution to the IS research stream is threefold. Firstly, the paper portrays that open innovation contests can spark coupled open innovation and facilitate innovation management, without lowering the generative capability. Secondly, it explains these gains by concluding that contests can catalyze cross-border knowledge transfer within innovation ecosystems. Thirdly, the paper moreover proposes that additional innovation deployment measures are needed in order for sustaining established relations and for aiding the implementation of innovation ideas beyond the contests.

Keywords
Innovation ecosystem, Knowledge transfer, Open innovation, Open innovation contest, Ecology, Ecosystems, Information management, Information systems, Knowledge management, Emergent technologies, Innovation ideas, Innovation management, Is researches, Mixed method, Pilot demonstrations, Innovation
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-37068 (URN)2-s2.0-84987668300 (Scopus ID)
Conference
22nd Americas Conference on Information Systems: Surfing the IT Innovation Wave (AMCIS 2016), August 11-14, 2016, San Diego, US
Available from: 2019-01-21 Created: 2019-01-21 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Adawi, T., Burden, H., Olsson, D. & Mattiasson, R. (2016). Characterizing Software Engineering Students' Discussions during Peer Instruction: Opportunities for Learning and Implications for Teaching. International Journal of Engineering ,Science and Innovative Technology, 32(2), 927-936
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterizing Software Engineering Students' Discussions during Peer Instruction: Opportunities for Learning and Implications for Teaching
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Engineering ,Science and Innovative Technology, ISSN 0949-149X, E-ISSN 2277-3754, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 927-936Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Peer instruction is a method for activating students during lectures, which has gained a considerable amount of attention in higher education due to claims of dramatic improvement in learning gains. The purpose of this qualitative research study is to investigate what types of discussions engineering students engage in during a peer instruction session and what learning possibilities that are enabled by these different types of discussions. We observed twelve students during six separate and simulated peer instruction sessions and the students were interviewed individually after the sessions.Ananalysis of the data revealed that the students engaged in three qualitatively different types of discussions: affirmative discussions, motivating discussions, and argumentative discussions. We characterize these different types of discussions in terms of the number of alternative answers the students discuss, the extent to which they draw on prior knowledge and experiences, as well as the fundamental difference between an explanation and an argument. A good opportunity for learning is opened up when students are aspiring to find the truth, not simply being satisfied with what they believe to be true. We conclude that students do not always engage in discussions that support their learning in the best way, and we discuss implications for using peer instruction as a teaching method.

Keywords
Argumentation, Learning possibilities, Peer instruction, Software designs, UML diagrams, Education, Software design, Software engineering, Students, Higher education, Qualitative research, Software engineering students, Teaching methods, Engineering education
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-32726 (URN)2-s2.0-84962623943 (Scopus ID)
Note

Special Issue: Trends in Software Engineering for Engineering Education

Available from: 2017-11-23 Created: 2017-11-23 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1811-0123

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