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Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Chinga-Carrasco, G., Ehman, N. V., Pettersson, J., Vallejos, M. E., Brodin, M., Felissia, F. E., . . . Area, M. C. (2018). Pulping and Pretreatment Affect the Characteristics of Bagasse Inks for Three-dimensional Printing. ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, 6(3), 4068-4075
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pulping and Pretreatment Affect the Characteristics of Bagasse Inks for Three-dimensional Printing
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2018 (English)In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 4068-4075Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bagasse is an underutilized agro-industrial residue with great potential as raw material for the production of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) for a range of applications. In this study, we have assessed the suitability of bagasse for production of CNF for three-dimensional (3D) printing. First, pulp fibers were obtained from the bagasse raw material using two fractionation methods, i.e. soda and hydrothermal treatment combined with soda. Second, the pulp fibers were pretreated by TEMPO-mediated oxidation using two levels of oxidation for comparison purposes. Finally, the CNF were characterized in detail and assessed as inks for 3D printing. The results show that CNF produced from fibers obtained by hydrothermal and soda pulping were less nanofibrillated than the corresponding material produced by soda pulping. However, the CNF sample obtained from soda pulp was cytotoxic, apparently due to a larger content of silica particles. All the CNF materials were 3D printable. We conclude that the noncytotoxic CNF produced from hydrothermally and soda treated pulp can potentially be used as inks for 3D printing of biomedical devices. 

Keywords
3D printing, Biomedical devices, Characterization, Chemical modification, Nanocellulose, Bagasse, Cellulose, Silica, 3-D printing, Agro-industrial residue, Cellulose nanofibrils, Fractionation methods, Hydrothermal treatments, TEMPO-mediated oxidation, Three-dimensional (3D) printing, 3D printers, Chemical Treatment, Printing, Three Dimensional Design
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-33512 (URN)10.1021/acssuschemeng.7b04440 (DOI)2-s2.0-85043320290 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: UN, Universidad Nacional de Colombia; Funding details: CONICET, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas; Funding details: NTNU, National Taiwan Normal University; Funding details: EDS; Funding details: PFI, Population Foundation of India; Funding details: 271054, Norges Forskningsråd; 

Available from: 2018-03-23 Created: 2018-03-23 Last updated: 2018-08-22Bibliographically approved
Rusu, C., Brodin, M., Hausvik, T. I., Hindersland, L. K., Chinga-Carrasco, G., Einarsrud, M. A. & Lein, H. (2018). The potential of functionalized ceramic particles in coatings for improved scratch resistance. Coatings, 8(6), Article ID 224.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The potential of functionalized ceramic particles in coatings for improved scratch resistance
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2018 (English)In: Coatings, ISSN 2079-6412, Vol. 8, no 6, article id 224Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The top layer of a typical high pressure floor laminate (HPL) consists of a melamine formaldehyde (MF) impregnated special wear layer (overlay) with alumina particles. This top layer plays a crucial role in determining the mechanical properties of the laminate. For HPLs, scratch resistance and scratch visibility are particularly important properties. This study aimed to improve the mechanical properties, particularly the scratch resistance, by adjusting the composition of the overlay. Laminates containing alumina particles were prepared and tested. These alumina particles were additionally functionalized with a silane coupling agent to ensure better adhesion between the particles and the resin. The functionalized particles led to enhanced scratch resistance of the laminates as well as improved dispersion of the particles within the resin. Micro scratch testing revealed that by using functionalized particles, the scratch surface damage was reduced and the recovery characteristics of the surface layer were improved. Higher scratch resistance and scratch hardness were thus obtained, along with a reduced scratch visibility.

Keywords
Alumina, Functionalization, High pressure laminates (HPL), Overlay, Scratch hardness, Scratch resistance, Scratch visibility, Silane coupling agent
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-35061 (URN)10.3390/coatings8060224 (DOI)2-s2.0-85051584443 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-27 Created: 2018-08-27 Last updated: 2018-08-27
Mihiretu, G. T., Brodin, M., Chimphango, A. F., ֘yaas, K., Hoff, B. H. & Görgens, J. F. (2017). Single-step microwave-assisted hot water extraction of hemicelluloses from selected lignocellulosic materials: A biorefinery approach. Bioresource Technology, 241, 669-680
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Single-step microwave-assisted hot water extraction of hemicelluloses from selected lignocellulosic materials: A biorefinery approach
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2017 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 241, p. 669-680Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The viability of single-step microwave-induced pressurized hot water conditions for co-production of xylan-based biopolymers and bioethanol from aspenwood sawdust and sugarcane trash was investigated. Extraction of hemicelluloses was conducted using microwave-assisted pressurized hot water system. The effects of temperature and time on extraction yield and enzymatic digestibility of resulting solids were determined. Temperatures between 170–200 °C for aspenwood and 165–195 °C for sugarcane trash; retention times between 8–22 min for both feedstocks, were selected for optimization purpose. Maximum xylan extraction yields of 66 and 50%, and highest cellulose digestibilities of 78 and 74%, were attained for aspenwood and sugarcane trash respectively. Monomeric xylose yields for both feedstocks were below 7%, showing that the xylan extracts were predominantly in non-monomeric form. Thus, single-step microwave-assisted hot water method is viable biorefinery approach to extract xylan from lignocelluloses while rendering the solid residues sufficiently digestible for ethanol production.

Keywords
hemicellulose, lignocellulose, biorefinery, Aspenwood, sugarcane trash
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-29970 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2017.05.159 (DOI)2-s2.0-85020459839 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-01 Created: 2017-08-01 Last updated: 2018-08-13Bibliographically approved
Chinga-Carrasco, G., Brodin, M. & Karlsen, T. (2014). Wood pulp fibres and nanocellulose: Characterization and application in biocomposite materials (ed.). In: : . Paper presented at 22nd, Int. Conference on composites or nano engineering, 13-19 July 2014, Malta..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wood pulp fibres and nanocellulose: Characterization and application in biocomposite materials
2014 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A composite can be defined as a material composed of two or more components having distinct morphology and chemistry, and giving synergetic effects. In this paper the term biocomposite is used, referring to i) a material having at least one bio-component (e.g. wood pulp fibres and nanofibrils) or ii) biomaterials intended for biomedical applications. The utilization of wood pulp fibres in composite materials has gained major interest during the last years. There are various wood pulp fibres that can be used as reinforcement in composites, e.g. thermo-mechanical pulp (TMP), chemi-thermo-mechanical pulp (CTMP) and kraft pulp fibres. Depending on the pulping process (TMP, CTMP or kraft pulp), the pulp fibres differ greatly with respect to the fibre morphology and chemistry. Kraft pulp fibres have been one of the most used raw materials for producing nanocellulose. Nanocellulose from wood refers to various cellulose nano-materials such as cellulose nanocrystals and nanofibrillated cellulose. Nanofibrillated cellulose is composed of a major fraction of structurally homogeneous nanofibrils having typical widths in the nanometre scale and lengths in the micrometre scale. Wood pulp fibres and nanofibrils have been proposed as reinforcement in composite materials. Some of the major motivations have been the potential improvements by using fibres and nanofibrillated materials with respect to e.g. strength, biodegradability and functionality. The purpose of the present work is to review some advances in biocomposite research and development, including three focus areas; structured biocomposites, flexible biocomposites and biomaterials.

National Category
Composite Science and Engineering Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology Nano Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-9670 (URN)
Conference
22nd, Int. Conference on composites or nano engineering, 13-19 July 2014, Malta.
Available from: 2016-09-12 Created: 2016-09-12 Last updated: 2018-08-14Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3456-9556

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