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Publications (10 of 24) Show all publications
He, Y., Boluk, Y., Pan, J., Ahniyaz, A., Deltin, T. & Claesson, P. M. (2019). Corrosion protective properties of cellulose nanocrystals reinforced waterborne acrylate-based composite coating. Corrosion Science, 155, 186-194
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Corrosion protective properties of cellulose nanocrystals reinforced waterborne acrylate-based composite coating
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2019 (English)In: Corrosion Science, ISSN 0010-938X, E-ISSN 1879-0496, Vol. 155, p. 186-194Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present investigation highlights corrosion protection of carbon steel by a waterborne acrylate-based matrix coating, with and without reinforcement by cellulose nanocrystals, by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 0.1 M NaCl solution over a period of 35 days. Interactions between cellulose nanocrystals and the matrix coating were demonstrated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results show that both coatings have high barrier performance but different protective characteristics during long-term exposure. The differences can be attributed to the reinforcement effect of cellulose nanocrystals caused by hydrogen bonding interactions between cellulose nanocrystals and the matrix coating.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2019
Keywords
A. Cellulose nanocrystals, A. Waterborne organic coatings, B. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, B. IR spectroscopy, C. Corrosion protection performance, C. Interfaces, Cellulose, Cellulose derivatives, Composite coatings, Electrochemical corrosion, Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Hydrogen bonds, Nanocrystals, Organic coatings, Reinforcement, Sodium chloride, Steel corrosion, Barrier performance, Cellulose nano-crystals, Corrosion protection performance, Hydrogen bonding interactions, Long term exposure, Protective characteristic, Protective properties, Reinforcement effects, Corrosion resistant coatings
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-38889 (URN)10.1016/j.corsci.2019.04.038 (DOI)2-s2.0-85065617813 (Scopus ID)
Note

Export Date: 28 May 2019; Article; CODEN: CRRSA; Correspondence Address: He, Y.; KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, Department of Chemistry, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, Drottning Kristinas väg 51, Sweden; email: yunjuan@kth.se; Funding details: China Scholarship Council; Funding text 1: Yunjuan He acknowledges the financial support of China Scholarship Council (CSC) for PhD study at KTH; PTE coatings AB Gamleby (Västervik, Sweden) is acknowledged for providing polymer coatings. Dr. Cem Örnek at the division of surface and corrosion science, KTH is thanked for helping preparing cross-section specimen for Optical microscopy measurement. This research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors. Appendix A

Available from: 2019-06-03 Created: 2019-06-03 Last updated: 2019-06-13Bibliographically approved
Zhao, W., Sugunan, A., Zhang, Z.-B. & Ahniyaz, A. (2019). Graphene and Flavin Mononucleotide Interaction in Aqueous Graphene Dispersions. The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 123(43), 26282-26288
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Graphene and Flavin Mononucleotide Interaction in Aqueous Graphene Dispersions
2019 (English)In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 123, no 43, p. 26282-26288Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A fundamental understanding of the interaction between graphene and a stabilizer is needed for the development of stable aqueous graphene dispersions. Here, we studied the interaction of graphene with the FMN in water. The UV-vis absorption spectra revealed blue shifts of the FMN absorption bands II (374 nm) and I (445 nm) in the presence of graphene. Furthermore, Fourier transform IR anal. showed that the graphene also upshifted the FMN vibration modes C10a=N1 and C4a=N5, which correspond to the FMN isoalloxazine binding sites N(1) and N(5), resp. In addition, thermogravimetric anal. showed that the thermal stability of graphene was enhanced by the adsorbed FMN, which supports the strong interaction. These results confirm that FMN adsorbs on the graphene surface in parallel conformation and hinders hydrogen bonding at the FMN isoalloxazine binding sites.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society, 2019
Keywords
flavin mononucleotide interaction graphene aqueous dispersion
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-40649 (URN)10.1021/acs.jpcc.9b06442 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-11-08 Created: 2019-11-08 Last updated: 2019-11-08Bibliographically approved
Li, J., Ecco, L., Ahniyaz, A. & Pan, J. (2019). Probing electrochemical mechanism of polyaniline and CeO 2 nanoparticles in alkyd coating with in-situ electrochemical-AFM and IRAS. Progress in organic coatings, 132, 399-408
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Probing electrochemical mechanism of polyaniline and CeO 2 nanoparticles in alkyd coating with in-situ electrochemical-AFM and IRAS
2019 (English)In: Progress in organic coatings, ISSN 0300-9440, E-ISSN 1873-331X, Vol. 132, p. 399-408Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The corrosion protection and electrochemical mechanism of solvent-borne alkyd composite coating containing 1.0 wt.% polyaniline (PANI) and 1.0 wt.% CeO 2 nanoparticles (NPs) for carbon steel in 3.0 wt.% NaCl solution were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ex-situ, in-situ and electrochemical controlled (EC) atomic force microscopy (AFM), open circuit potential (OCP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) methods. The SEM and ex-situ AFM results revealed the micro- and nanostructure of the composite coating. The in-situ sequential AFM images and line profiling analysis indicated electrochemical activity of the NPs and a high stability of the composite coating in NaCl solution. The results of EC-AFM combined with cyclic voltammetry (CV) demonstrated volume change of the PANI NPs upon reduction and oxidation at certain applied potentials on the coating. The redox reactions between the different forms of PANI and the effect of the CeO 2 NPs on the polymerization of the composite polymer were further confirmed by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS). The OCP and EIS results revealed that the composite coating provided an improved corrosion protection for carbon steel within several days of exposure, which was attributed to the barrier protection of CeO 2 NPs and the passivation ability of PANI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2019
Keywords
Alkyd coating, CeO 2, Corrosion mechanism, In-situ and EC-AFM, EIS, Nanoparticles, Polyaniline, Absorption spectroscopy, Atomic force microscopy, Cerium oxide, Composite coatings, Corrosion resistant coatings, Cyclic voltammetry, Electrochemical corrosion, Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, Redox reactions, Scanning electron microscopy, Sodium alloys, Sodium chloride, Steel corrosion, Alkyd coatings, CeO2, Corrosion mechanisms, Electrochemical activities, Electrochemical mechanisms, Infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, Micro and nanostructures, Open circuit potential, Cerium alloys
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-38352 (URN)10.1016/j.porgcoat.2019.04.012 (DOI)2-s2.0-85063906914 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding text 1: Financial support from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement No. SteelCoat 263262 is gratefully acknowledged. Dr. Matthew Fielden at the Department of Chemistry, KTH is gratefully acknowledged for language correction and comments for the results. J. Li thanks Dr. Mats Sandgren at Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences for kind help with potential plagiarism check.

Available from: 2019-05-06 Created: 2019-05-06 Last updated: 2019-05-06Bibliographically approved
Orr, M., Khandhar, A., Seydoux, E., Liang, H., Gage, E., Mikasa, T., . . . Fox, C. (2019). Reprogramming the adjuvant properties of aluminum oxyhydroxide with nanoparticle technology. npj Vaccines, 4, Article ID 1.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reprogramming the adjuvant properties of aluminum oxyhydroxide with nanoparticle technology
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2019 (English)In: npj Vaccines, ISSN 2059-0105, Vol. 4, article id 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aluminum salts, developed almost a century ago, remain the most commonly used adjuvant for licensed human vaccines. Compared to more recently developed vaccine adjuvants, aluminum adjuvants such as Alhydrogel are heterogeneous in nature, consisting of 1–10 micrometer-sized aggregates of nanoparticle aluminum oxyhydroxide fibers. To determine whether the particle size and aggregated state of aluminum oxyhydroxide affects its adjuvant activity, we developed a scalable, top-down process to produce stable nanoparticles (nanoalum) from the clinical adjuvant Alhydrogel by including poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) polymer as a stabilizing agent. Surprisingly, the PAA:nanoalum adjuvant elicited a robust TH1 immune response characterized by antigen-specific CD4+ T cells expressing IFN-γ and TNF, as well as high IgG2 titers, whereas the parent Alhydrogel and PAA elicited modest TH2 immunity characterized by IgG1 antibodies. ASC, NLRP3 and the IL-18R were all essential for TH1 induction, indicating an essential role of the inflammasome in this adjuvant’s activity. Compared to microparticle Alhydrogel this nanoalum adjuvant provided superior immunogenicity and increased protective efficacy against lethal influenza challenge. Therefore PAA:nanoalum represents a new class of alum adjuvant that preferentially enhances TH1 immunity to vaccine antigens. This adjuvant may be widely beneficial to vaccines for which TH1 immunity is important, including tuberculosis, pertussis, and malaria.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-37007 (URN)10.1038/s41541-018-0094-0 (DOI)2-s2.0-85059532005 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding details: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; Funding details: Case Western Reserve University, CWRU; Funding details: Adhesives and Sealant Council, ASC; Funding details: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, HHS, 4R01AI025038; Funding details: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIAID; Funding details: National Institutes of Health, NIH; Funding details: OPP1130379; Funding details: OPP1055855; .

Available from: 2019-01-21 Created: 2019-01-21 Last updated: 2019-01-21Bibliographically approved
He, Y., Dobryden, I., Pan, J., Ahniyaz, A., Deltin, T., Corkery, R. W. & Claesson, P. M. (2018). Nano-scale mechanical and wear properties of a waterborne hydroxyacrylic-melamine anti-corrosion coating. Applied Surface Science, 457, 548-558
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nano-scale mechanical and wear properties of a waterborne hydroxyacrylic-melamine anti-corrosion coating
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2018 (English)In: Applied Surface Science, ISSN 0169-4332, E-ISSN 1873-5584, Vol. 457, p. 548-558Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Corrosion protection is commonly achieved by applying a thin polymer coating on the metal surface. Many studies have been devoted to local events occurring at the metal surface leading to local or general corrosion. In contrast, changes occurring in the organic coating after exposure to corrosive conditions are much less studied. In this article we outline how changes in the coating itself due to curing conditions, environmental and erosion effects can be investigated at the nanometer scale, and discuss how such changes would affect its corrosion protection performance. We focus on a waterborne hydroxyacrylic-melamine coating, showing high corrosion protection performance for carbon steel during long-term (≈35 days) exposure to 0.1 M NaCl solution. The effect of curing time on the conversion of the crosslinking reaction within the coating was evaluated by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR); the wetting properties of the cured films were investigated by contact angle measurement, and the corrosion resistance was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). In particular, coating nanomechanical and wear properties before and after exposure to 0.1 M NaCl, were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Fiber-like surface features were observed after exposure, which are suggested to arise due to diffusion of monomers or low molecular weight polymers to the surface. This may give rise to local weakening of the coating, leading to local corrosion after even longer exposure times. We also find a direct correlation between the stick-slip spacing during shearing and plastic deformation induced in the surface layer, giving rise to topographical ripple structures on the nanometer length scale.

Keywords
Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, Fast fourier transform analysis, Nanomechanical property, Nanowear, Waterborne anti-corrosive coating, Atomic force microscopy, Contact angle, Corrosion resistance, Crosslinking, Curing, Electrochemical corrosion, Fast Fourier transforms, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Localized corrosion, Nanotechnology, Organic coatings, Plastic coatings, Polymers, Slip forming, Sodium chloride, Steel corrosion, Stick-slip, Wear of materials, Wetting, Anti-corrosive coatings, Corrosion protection performance, Crosslinking reaction, Fast fourier, Low-molecular-weight polymers, Nano Wear, Nanometer length scale, Corrosion resistant coatings
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-34497 (URN)10.1016/j.apsusc.2018.06.284 (DOI)2-s2.0-85049824578 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: AFM, Advanced Foods and Materials Canada;

Funding details: CSC, China Scholarship Council;

Funding details: VR [ 2015-05080, VR, Vetenskapsrådet;

Available from: 2018-08-09 Created: 2018-08-09 Last updated: 2018-08-09Bibliographically approved
Abitbol, T., Ahniyaz, A. & Swerin, A. (2018). UV-blocking hybrid nanocellulose films containing ceria and silica nanoparticles. In: International Conference on Nanotechnology for Renewable Materials 2018: . Paper presented at 2018 TAPPI International Conference on Nanotechnology for Renewable Materials, 11 June 2018 through 14 June 2018 (pp. 503-515).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>UV-blocking hybrid nanocellulose films containing ceria and silica nanoparticles
2018 (English)In: International Conference on Nanotechnology for Renewable Materials 2018, 2018, p. 503-515Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-37768 (URN)2-s2.0-85060440082 (Scopus ID)9781510870369 (ISBN)
Conference
2018 TAPPI International Conference on Nanotechnology for Renewable Materials, 11 June 2018 through 14 June 2018
Available from: 2019-02-11 Created: 2019-02-11 Last updated: 2019-02-11Bibliographically approved
Abitbol, T., Ahniyaz, A. & Swerin, A. (2018). UV-blocking hybrid nanocellulose films containing ceria and silica nanoparticles. In: International Conference on Nanotechnology for Renewable Materials 2018: . Paper presented at 2018 TAPPI International Conference on Nanotechnology for Renewable Materials, 11 June 2018 through 14 June 2018 (pp. 503-515).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>UV-blocking hybrid nanocellulose films containing ceria and silica nanoparticles
2018 (English)In: International Conference on Nanotechnology for Renewable Materials 2018, 2018, p. 503-515Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-37711 (URN)2-s2.0-85060440082 (Scopus ID)9781510870369 (ISBN)
Conference
2018 TAPPI International Conference on Nanotechnology for Renewable Materials, 11 June 2018 through 14 June 2018
Available from: 2019-02-13 Created: 2019-02-13 Last updated: 2019-03-06Bibliographically approved
Persson, K., Ahniyaz, A., Magner, J., Royen, H. & Filipsson, S. (2017). A Photocatalytic Membrane For Treatment of Pharmaceuticals in Wastewater.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Photocatalytic Membrane For Treatment of Pharmaceuticals in Wastewater
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2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Toxic organics, pharmaceuticals and antibiotics are currently only partially or not at all removed from wastewater, as today’s wastewater treatment will only partly degrade those substances. Therefore, those substances will be found in the effluent from wastewater treatment plants and this can be a threat to both human health and aquatic species.

Photocatalytic membranes show great promise as a method to combat the challenge of toxic organics in wastewater. The novel photocatalytic membrane developed in the project was shown to photocatalytically decompose organic compounds such as pharmaceutical residues and dyes in both tap water and treated effluent from a membrane bioreactor (MBR) wastewater treatment process. Several parameters affecting the affinity of the pharmaceuticals to the membrane surface, such as the hydrophobicity and pKa of the pharmaceuticals and the pH of the water, were shown to affect the efficacy of the removal.

Finally, when irradiated with UV light the photocatalytic membrane showed promise of keeping high flux and reducing downtime by lengthening the cleaning cycle.

Publisher
p. 25
Series
SP Rapport, ISSN 0284-5172
Keywords
Water, residue, organic, pharmaceutical, water, health, membrane, cleaning, photocatalyst
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-36288 (URN)
Available from: 2018-11-14 Created: 2018-11-14 Last updated: 2018-11-14Bibliographically approved
Persson, K., Ahniyaz, A., Magnér, J., Royen, H. & Filipsson, S. (2017). A Photocatalytic Membrane: for Treatment of Pharmaceuticals in Wastewater.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Photocatalytic Membrane: for Treatment of Pharmaceuticals in Wastewater
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2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Toxic organics, pharmaceuticals and antibiotics are currently only partially or not at all removed from wastewater, as today’s wastewater treatment will only partly degrade those substances. Therefore, those substances will be found in the effluent from wastewater treatment plants and this can be a threat to both human health and aquatic species.

Photocatalytic membranes show great promise as a method to combat the challenge of toxic organics in wastewater. The novel photocatalytic membrane developed in the project was shown to photocatalytically decompose organic compounds such as pharmaceutical residues and dyes in both tap water and treated effluent from a membrane bioreactor (MBR) wastewater treatment process. Several parameters affecting the affinity of the pharmaceuticals to the membrane surface, such as the hydrophobicity and pKa of the pharmaceuticals and the pH of the water, were shown to affect the efficacy of the removal.

Finally, when irradiated with UV light the photocatalytic membrane showed promise of keeping high flux and reducing downtime by lengthening the cleaning cycle.

Publisher
p. 25
Series
SP Rapport ; 2017:12
National Category
Environmental Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-29884 (URN)
Projects
Photocat
Funder
VINNOVA
Available from: 2017-06-13 Created: 2017-06-13 Last updated: 2019-01-03Bibliographically approved
Kohs, W., Kahr, J., Ahniyaz, A., Zhang, N. & Trifonova, A. (2017). Electrolyte-cathode interactions in 5-V lithium-ion cells. Journal of Solid State Electrochemistry
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Electrolyte-cathode interactions in 5-V lithium-ion cells
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Solid State Electrochemistry, ISSN 1432-8488, E-ISSN 1433-0768Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

The electrolyte/electrode interactions on the anode side of a lithium-ion cell and the formation of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) have been investigated intensively in the past and are fairly well understood. Present knowledge about the reactions on the cathode side and the resulting cathode electrolyte interphase (CEI) is less detailed. In this study, the electrolyte/electrode interactions on the surface of the high-voltage cathode material LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO), both bare and FePO4-coated, were investigated. The gases evolving upon first time charging of the system were investigated using a GC/MS combination. The degradation products included THF, dimethyl peroxide, phosphor trifluoride, 1,3-dioxolane and dimethyl difluor silane, formed in the GC’s column as its coating reacts with HF from the experiments. Although these substances and their formation are in themselves interesting, the absence of many degradation products which have been mentioned in the existing literature is of equal interest. Our results clearly indicate that coating a cathode material can have a major influence on the amount and composition of the gaseous decomposition products in the formation phase. © 2017 The Author(s)

Keywords
Cathodes, Coatings, Degradation, Electrodes, Lithium-ion batteries, Solid electrolytes, Cath-ode materials, Decomposition products, Degradation products, Electrolyte cathode, High voltage cathode, LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4, Lithium-ion cells, Solid electrolyte interphase, Electrolytes
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-30818 (URN)10.1007/s10008-017-3701-5 (DOI)2-s2.0-85027182399 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-09-06 Created: 2017-09-06 Last updated: 2018-07-06Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8775-0602

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