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Rutland, Mark W., ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8935-8070
Publications (10 of 68) Show all publications
Sun, K., Shoaib, T., Rutland, M. W., Beller, J., Do, C. & Espinosa-Marzal, R. M. (2023). Insight into the assembly of lipid-hyaluronan complexes in osteoarthritic conditions. Biointerphases, 18(2), Article ID 021005.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Insight into the assembly of lipid-hyaluronan complexes in osteoarthritic conditions
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2023 (English)In: Biointerphases, ISSN 1934-8630, E-ISSN 1559-4106, Vol. 18, no 2, article id 021005Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Interactions between molecules in the synovial fluid and the cartilage surface may play a vital role in the formation of adsorbed films that contribute to the low friction of cartilage boundary lubrication. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common degenerative joint disease. Previous studies have shown that in OA-diseased joints, hyaluronan (HA) not only breaks down resulting in a much lower molecular weight (MW), but also its concentration is reduced ten times. Here, we have investigated the structural changes of lipid-HA complexes as a function of HA concentration and MW to simulate the physiologically relevant conditions that exist in healthy and diseased joints. Small angle neutron scattering and dynamic light scattering were used to determine the structure of HA-lipid vesicles in bulk solution, while a combination of atomic force microscopy and quartz crystal microbalance was applied to study their assembly on a gold surface. We infer a significant influence of both MW and HA concentrations on the structure of HA-lipid complexes in bulk and assembled on a gold surface. Our results suggest that low MW HA cannot form an amorphous layer on the gold surface, which is expected to negatively impact the mechanical integrity and longevity of the boundary layer and could contribute to the increased wear of the cartilage that has been reported in joints diseased with OA. © 2023 Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Institute of Physics Inc., 2023
Keywords
Gold, Hyaluronic acid, Joints (anatomy), Light scattering, Neutron scattering, Adsorbed films, Boundary lubrications, Cartilage surfaces, Condition, Diseased joints, Gold surfaces, Hyaluronan, Low friction, Low molecular weight, Synovial fluid, Cartilage, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, animal, chemistry, Gallus gallus, human, molecular dynamics, molecular weight, osteoarthritis, pathology, 1, 2-Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, Animals, Chickens, Humans, Molecular Dynamics Simulation
National Category
Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-64393 (URN)10.1116/6.0002502 (DOI)2-s2.0-85152291967 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding details: National Science Foundation, NSF, CMMI 17-61696, CMMI 20-35122, CMMI 21-21681; Funding text 1: This article is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Nos. CMMI 17-61696, CMMI 20-35122, and CMMI 21-21681. The research was carried out in part in the Materials Research Laboratory Central Research Facilities, University of Illinois. This research used resources at the Spallation Neutron Source, a DOE Office of Science User Facility operated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Available from: 2023-05-03 Created: 2023-05-03 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Hammond, O., Bousrez, G., Mehler, F., Li, S., Shimpi, M., Doutch, J., . . . Mudring, A.-V. -. (2023). Molecular Architecture Effects on Bulk Nanostructure in Bis(Orthoborate) Ionic Liquids. Small
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Molecular Architecture Effects on Bulk Nanostructure in Bis(Orthoborate) Ionic Liquids
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2023 (English)In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

A series of 19 ionic liquids (ILs) based on phosphonium and imidazolium cations of varying alkyl-chain lengths with the orthoborate anions bis(oxalato)borate [BOB]−, bis(mandelato)borate, [BMB]− and bis(salicylato)borate, [BScB]−, are synthesized and studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). All measured systems display nanostructuring, with 1-methyl-3-n-alkyl imidazolium-orthoborates forming clearly bicontinuous L3 spongelike phases when the alkyl chains are longer than C6 (hexyl). L3 phases are fitted using the Teubner and Strey model, and diffusely-nanostructured systems are primarily fitted using the Ornstein-Zernicke correlation length model. Strongly-nanostructured systems have a strong dependence on the cation, with molecular architecture variation explored to determine the driving forces for self-assembly. The ability to form well-defined complex phases is effectively extinguished in several ways: methylation of the most acidic imidazolium ring proton, replacing the imidazolium 3-methyl group with a longer hydrocarbon chain, substitution of [BOB]− by [BMB]−, or exchanging the imidazolium for phosphonium systems, irrespective of phosphonium architecture. The results suggest there is only a small window of opportunity, in terms of molecular amphiphilicity and cation:anion volume matching, for the formation of stable extensive bicontinuous domains in pure bulk orthoborate-based ILs. Particularly important for self-assembly processes appear to be the ability to form H-bonding networks, which offer additional versatility in imidazolium systems. © 2023 The Authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley and Sons Inc, 2023
Keywords
ionic liquids, nanostructures, orthoborates, small angle neutron scattering, Alkylation, Negative ions, Network architecture, Neutron scattering, Positive ions, Alkyl chain lengths, Bicontinuous, Imidazolium, Imidazolium cation, Molecular architecture, Nanostructured systems, Ortho-borates, Oxalato, Phosphonium cations, Small-angle neutron scattering
National Category
Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-65716 (URN)10.1002/smll.202300912 (DOI)2-s2.0-85163735321 (Scopus ID)
Note

The authors thank STFC ISIS Neutron & Muon Source forSwedish Foundation for Strategic Research (“REFIT” project EM16-0013),the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (project KAW2012.0078), theSwedish Research Council (projects 2018–05017 and 2017–04080) aregratefully acknowledged. AVM acknowledges the Royal Swedish Academyof Sciences for support through the Göran Gustafsson prize in Chemistryand the Villum Foundation for a Villum Investigator award. Dr Liliana deCampo is thanked for useful discussions. The ToC graphic was generatedusing Midjourney AI and provided under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license. access tothe diffractometer SANS2D under beamtime allocation RB2210058. 

Available from: 2023-08-09 Created: 2023-08-09 Last updated: 2023-08-11Bibliographically approved
Li, S., Pilkington, G. A., Mehler, F., Hammond, O. S., Boudier, A., Vorobiev, A., . . . Rutland, M. W. (2023). Tuneable interphase transitions in ionic liquid/carrier systems via voltage control. Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 652, 1240-1249
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tuneable interphase transitions in ionic liquid/carrier systems via voltage control
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 652, p. 1240-1249Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The structure and interaction of ionic liquids (ILs) influence their interfacial composition, and their arrangement (i.e., electric double-layer (EDL) structure), can be controlled by an electric field. Here, we employed a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to study the electrical response of two non-halogenated phosphonium orthoborate ILs, dissolved in a polar solvent at the interface. The response is influenced by the applied voltage, the structure of the ions, and the solvent polarizability. One IL showed anomalous electro-responsivity, suggesting a self-assembly bilayer structure of the IL cation at the gold interface, which transitions to a typical EDL structure at higher positive potential. Neutron reflectivity (NR) confirmed this interfacial structuring and compositional changes at the electrified gold surface. A cation-dominated self-assembly structure is observed for negative and neutral voltages, which abruptly transitions to an anion-rich interfacial layer at positive voltages. An interphase transition explains the electro-responsive behaviour of self-assembling IL/carrier systems, pertinent for ILs in advanced tribological and electrochemical contexts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
National Category
Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-66691 (URN)10.1016/j.jcis.2023.08.111 (DOI)
Note

The authors thank the ILL for providing neutron beam time on SuperADAM (doi:10.5291/ILL-DATA.9-13-1006). The Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (Project No. KAW2012.0078), the Swedish Research Council, VR (Project No. 2017-04080) and the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (Project No. EM16-0013, “REFIT”) are acknowledged for their financial support.

Available from: 2023-09-05 Created: 2023-09-05 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Skedung, L., Hörlin, E., Harris, K. L., Rutland, M. W., Applebaum, M., Greaves, A. & Luengo, G. (2021). A Curly Q: Is Frizz a Matter of Friction?. Perception, 50(8), 728-732
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Curly Q: Is Frizz a Matter of Friction?
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2021 (English)In: Perception, ISSN 0301-0066, E-ISSN 1468-4233, Vol. 50, no 8, p. 728-732Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The oft discussed and fretted over environmental influences on hair have led to a popular consensus which suggests that elevated temperature and humidity lead to frizzier, wilder hair. However, few attempts at actually quantifying these effects have been made. Although frizziness is usually perceived visually, here the influence of variations in temperature and humidity on the tactile perception and friction of curly and straight hair were investigated. It is shown that changes in humidity may disproportionately affect perceived frizziness of curly hair by touch due to concurrent changes in the tactile friction. © The Author(s) 2021.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE Publications Ltd, 2021
Keywords
environmental conditions, hair care, tactile friction, tactile perception
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-54705 (URN)10.1177/03010066211024442 (DOI)2-s2.0-85108305444 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding text 1: The author(s) declared the following potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: GSL, MA and AG are full employees of L’Oréal involved in research activities. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden have received funding from L’Oréal to perform this research.; Funding text 2: The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: The majority of this work was financed by L’Oréal.

Available from: 2021-06-30 Created: 2021-06-30 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Harris, K. L., Collier, E. S., Skedung, L. & Rutland, M. W. (2021). A Sticky Situation or Rough Going?: Influencing Haptic Perception of Wood Coatings Through Frictional and Topographical Design. Tribology letters, 69(3), Article ID 113.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Sticky Situation or Rough Going?: Influencing Haptic Perception of Wood Coatings Through Frictional and Topographical Design
2021 (English)In: Tribology letters, ISSN 1023-8883, E-ISSN 1573-2711, Vol. 69, no 3, article id 113Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Improving the tactile aesthetics of products that can be described as touch intensive is an increasing priority within many sectors, including the furniture industry. Understanding which physical characteristics contribute to the haptic experience of a surface, and how, is therefore highly topical. It has earlier been shown that both friction and topography affect tactile perception. Thus, two series of stimuli have been produced using standard coating techniques, with systematic variation in (physical) friction and roughness properties. This was achieved through appropriate selection of matting agents and resins. The stimuli sets were then evaluated perceptually to determine the extent to which discrimination between pairs of surfaces followed the systematic materials variation. In addition to investigating the role of the physical properties in discrimination of the surfaces, their influence on perceived pleasantness and naturalness was also studied. The results indicate that changes in tactile perception can be understood in terms of friction and roughness, and that varying the matting agents (topography) and resins (material properties) in the coatings provide the controlling factors for furniture applications. Perceived pleasantness is associated with low friction and smoother topography, whilst perceived naturalness is found to be described by an interaction between tactile friction and the average maximum peak height of the surface features. Graphic Abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.] © 2021, The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2021
Keywords
Haptic perception, Psychophysics, Psychotribology, Tactile friction, Coatings, Resins, Surface roughness, Topography, Controlling factors, Furniture industry, Matting agents, Physical characteristics, Surface feature, Systematic variation, Tactile perception, Friction
National Category
Tribology (Interacting Surfaces including Friction, Lubrication and Wear)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-56010 (URN)10.1007/s11249-021-01485-z (DOI)2-s2.0-85112132029 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding text 1: This work is an extract from a project predominantly financed by IKEA of Sweden AB and Akzo Nobel Coatings International B.V. We extend our thanks anonymously to all of the people there who contributed with practical assistance, materials choices and supported the concept.; Funding text 2: Open access funding provided by Royal Institute of Technology. This work is an extract from a project predominantly financed by IKEA of Sweden AB and Akzo Nobel Coatings International B.V.

Available from: 2021-08-25 Created: 2021-08-25 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Rohlmann, P., Watanabe, S., Shimpi, M., Leckner, J., Rutland, M. W., Harper, J. & Glavatskih, S. (2021). Boundary lubricity of phosphonium bisoxalatoborate ionic liquids. Tribology International, 161, Article ID 107075.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Boundary lubricity of phosphonium bisoxalatoborate ionic liquids
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2021 (English)In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 161, article id 107075Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The lubricating performance of trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium bisoxalatoorthoborate (P-BOB) ionic liquid is analysed at 80 °C and 140 °C, and compared to an ionic liquid containing a partially hydrated version of the anion. The reduction of the anions produces oxalate complexes that contribute synergistically to lower friction. The role of oxalate in enhancing lubricity was indicated by the fact that the partially hydrated anion is a precursor orthoborate anion complexed with oxalic acid. It consequently showed the lowest friction at 80 °C. Upon heating, the precursor was converted into [BOB]− and displayed the same friction at 140 °C as the fully synthesised species. The mechanisms of the breakdown of the [BOB]− anion and formation of the tribofilm are elucidated. © 2021 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2021
Keywords
Friction, Orthoborate, Oxalate, Wear
National Category
Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-53469 (URN)10.1016/j.triboint.2021.107075 (DOI)2-s2.0-85106485187 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Vetenskapsrådet, VR, 2018-05017; Funding details: Stiftelsen för Strategisk Forskning, SSF, EM16-0013; Funding details: Knut och Alice Wallenbergs Stiftelse, KAW2012.0078; Funding text 1: The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (Project EM16-0013 ), the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (Project KAW2012.0078 ) and the Swedish Research Council (Project 2018-05017 ) are gratefully acknowledged for financial support.

Available from: 2021-06-14 Created: 2021-06-14 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Reddy, A., Munavirov, B., Pilkington, G., Calderon Salmeron, G., Rutland, M. W. & Glavatskih, S. (2021). Micro- To Nano- To from Surface to Bulk: Influence of Halogen-Free Ionic Liquid Architecture and Dissociation on Green Oil Lubricity. ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, 9(40), 13606-13617
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Micro- To Nano- To from Surface to Bulk: Influence of Halogen-Free Ionic Liquid Architecture and Dissociation on Green Oil Lubricity
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2021 (English)In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, E-ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 9, no 40, p. 13606-13617Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Four nonhalogenated ionic liquids (ILs) based on the same phosphonium cation are investigated in terms of the anion suitability for enhancing the lubricity of a biodegradable oil. For all test conditions, typical for industrial machine components, the lubrication is shown to be governed by nonsacrificial films formed by the physisorption of ionic species on the tribo-surfaces. The anionic structure appears to have an important role in the formation of friction modifying films. The orthoborate ILs exhibit the formation of robust ionic boundary films, resulting in reduced friction and better wear protection. On the contrary, the surface adsorption of phosphinate and phosphate ILs appears to antagonistically disrupt the intrinsic lubrication properties of the biodegradable oil, resulting in high friction and wear. Through additional investigations, it is postulated that the higher dissociation of orthoborate ILs in the biodegradable oil allows the formation of hierarchical and electrostatically overscreened layer structures with long-range order, whereas the ILs with phosphate and phosphinate anions exhibit low dissociation in biodegradable oil, possibly due to the ion pairs being surrounded by a hydrocarbon halo, which presumably results in weak adsorption to form a mixed interfacial layer with no long-range order. © 2021 The Authors. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society, 2021
Keywords
elastohydrodynamic lubrication, friction, ion dissociation, lubricant additives, lubricity, nonhalogenated ionic liquids, surface adsorption, Additives, Adsorption, Dissociation, Ionic liquids, Lubricants, Negative ions, Shafts (machine components), Tribology, Van der Waals forces, Wear of materials, Bio-degradable oil, Halogen-free ionic liquids, Ion dissociations, Long range orders, Nonhalogenated ionic liquid, Ortho-borates, Phosphinate
National Category
Tribology (Interacting Surfaces including Friction, Lubrication and Wear)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-56920 (URN)10.1021/acssuschemeng.1c04854 (DOI)2-s2.0-85117307754 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding details: Stiftelsen för Strategisk Forskning, SSF, EM16-0013; Funding details: Knut och Alice Wallenbergs Stiftelse, KAW2012.0078; Funding details: Vetenskapsrådet, VR, 2018-05017; Funding text 1: The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (project EM16-0013), the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (project KAW2012.0078), and the Swedish Research Council (project 2018-05017) are gratefully acknowledged for financial support.

Available from: 2021-11-22 Created: 2021-11-22 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Zhang, Y., Rutland, M. W., Luo, J., Atkin, R. & Li, H. (2021). Potential-Dependent Superlubricity of Ionic Liquids on a Graphite Surface. The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 125(7), 3940-3947
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Potential-Dependent Superlubricity of Ionic Liquids on a Graphite Surface
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2021 (English)In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 125, no 7, p. 3940-3947Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The lubricities of four quaternary phosphonium ionic liquids-trihexyltetradecylphosphonium bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)phosphinate ([P6,6,6,14][(iC8)2PO2]), trihexyltetradecylphosphonium bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate ([P6,6,6,14][BEHP]), trihexyltetradecylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([P6,6,6,14][TFSI]), and tributylmethylphosphonium bis(trifluoromenthylsulfonyl)imide ([P4,4,4,1][TFSI])-were measured as a function of potential on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The shear strength and surface contact radius values fitted from JKR model indicate the AFM probe slides on an IL boundary layer rather than bare HOPG. Frictions change as the compositions of the boundary layers switch from cation enriched to anion enriched when the potential changes from negative to positive. Superlubricity, which refers to near zero increase in friction with load, is achieved for the [P6,6,6,14]+ cation at-1.0 V and the [TFSI]- anion at +1.0 V. The lubricities of ILs are mainly influenced by three factors: The alkyl chain length, chemical composition, and ion sizes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society, 2021
Keywords
Atomic force microscopy, Friction, Graphite, Ionic liquids, Positive ions, Alkyl chain lengths, Bis(2-ethylhexyl)- Phosphate, Chemical compositions, Graphite surfaces, Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, Phosphonium ionic liquid, Potential-dependent, Trihexyltetradecylphosphonium, Boundary layers
National Category
Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-52923 (URN)10.1021/acs.jpcc.0c10804 (DOI)2-s2.0-85101494661 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering, AINSE; Funding details: National Natural Science Foundation of China, NSFC, 21776120; Funding details: Fonds Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek, FWO, G0B3218N; Funding details: Natural Science Foundation of Fujian Province, 2018J01433; Funding details: China Scholarship Council, CSC; Funding text 1: Y.Z. thanks China Scholarship Council and Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering for the PhD scholarships. J.L. acknowledges funding from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Project No. 21776120), the Natural Science Foundation of Fujian Province, China (Project No. 2018J01433), and the Research Foundation – Flanders (FWO), Belgium (Project No. G0B3218N).

Available from: 2021-04-09 Created: 2021-04-09 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Munavirov, B., Black, J., Shah, F., Leckner, J., Rutland, M. W., Harper, J. & Glavatskih, S. (2021). The effect of anion architecture on the lubrication chemistry of phosphonium orthoborate ionic liquids. Scientific Reports, 11(1), Article ID 24021.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of anion architecture on the lubrication chemistry of phosphonium orthoborate ionic liquids
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2021 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 24021Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Phosphonium ionic liquids with orthoborate anions have been studied in terms of their interfacial film formation, both physisorbed and sacrificial from chemical breakdown, in sheared contacts of varying harshness. The halogen-free anion architecture was varied through (i) the heteronuclear ring size, (ii) the hybridisation of the constituent atoms, and (iii) the addition of aryl functionalities. Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry analysis revealed the extent of sacrificial tribofilm formation allowing the relative stability of the ionic liquids under tribological conditions to be determined and their breakdown mechanisms to be compared to simple thermal decomposition. Overall, ionic liquids outperformed reference oils as lubricants; in some cases, sacrificial films were formed (with anion breakdown a necessary precursor to phosphonium cation decomposition) while in other cases, a protective, self-assembly lubricant layer or hybrid film was formed. The salicylate-based anion was the most chemically stable and decomposed only slightly even under the harshest conditions. It was further found that surface topography influenced the degree of breakdown through enhanced material transport and replenishment. This work thus unveils the relationship between ionic liquid composition and structure, and the ensuing inter- and intra-molecular interactions and chemical stability, and demonstrates the intrinsic tuneability of an ionic liquid lubrication technology. © 2021, The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Research, 2021
National Category
Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-57503 (URN)10.1038/s41598-021-02763-5 (DOI)2-s2.0-85121368601 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, Australian Research Council, CEED; Funding details: Centre of Excellence for Core to Crust Fluid Systems, Australian Research Council, CCFS, ARC; Funding details: Centre of Excellence for Integrative Brain Function, Australian Research Council, CIBF; Funding details: Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Australian Research Council; Funding details: Australian Research Council, ARC, DP180103682; Funding details: Stiftelsen för Strategisk Forskning, SSF, EM16-0013; Funding details: Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, Australian Research Council, CoEPP; Funding details: Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders, Australian Research Council, CCD; Funding details: Knut och Alice Wallenbergs Stiftelse, KAW2012.0078; Funding details: Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan, KTH; Funding details: Vetenskapsrådet, VR, 2018-05017; Funding details: Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology, Australian Research Council, PEB; Funding details: Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Australian Research Council, CXS; Funding details: Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, Australian Research Council, ARC, ACES; Funding details: Training Centre for Food and Beverage Supply Chain Optimisation, Australian Research Council; Funding details: Centre of Excellence in Future Low-Energy Electronics Technologies, Australian Research Council, FLEET; Funding text 1: The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (project EM16-0013), the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (project KAW2012.0078), the Swedish Research Council (project 2018-05017) and the Australian Research Council Discovery Programme (project supported in part by DP180103682) are gratefully acknowledged for financial support. 

Available from: 2021-12-30 Created: 2021-12-30 Last updated: 2023-10-31Bibliographically approved
Bergendal, E., Gutfreund, P., Pilkington, G. A., Campbell, R. A., Müller-Buschbaum, P., Holt, S. A. & Rutland, M. W. (2021). Tuneable interfacial surfactant aggregates mimic lyotropic phases and facilitate large scale nanopatterning. Nanoscale, 13(1), 371-379
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tuneable interfacial surfactant aggregates mimic lyotropic phases and facilitate large scale nanopatterning
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2021 (English)In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 371-379Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is shown that the air-liquid interface can be made to display the same rich curvature phenomena as common lyotropic liquid crystal systems. Through mixing an insoluble, naturally occurring, branched fatty acid, with an unbranched fatty acid of the same length, systematic variation in the packing constraints at the air-water interface could be obtained. The combination of atomic force microscopy and neutron reflectometry is used to demonstrate that the water surface exhibits significant tuneable topography. By systematic variation of the two fatty acid proportions, ordered arrays of monodisperse spherical caps, cylindrical sections, and a mesh phase are all observed, as well as the expected lamellar structure. The tuneable deformability of the air-water interface permits this hitherto unexplored topological diversity, which is analogous to the phase elaboration displayed by amphiphiles in solution. It offers a wealth of novel possibilities for the tailoring of nanostructure

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2021
Keywords
Air, Atomic force microscopy, Fatty acids, Lamellar structures, Liquid crystals, Topography, Air liquid interfaces, Air water interfaces, Atomic Force Microscopy and Neutron Reflectometry, Interfacial surfactants, Lyotropic liquid crystal, Naturally occurring, Packing constraints, Systematic variation, Phase interfaces
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-52018 (URN)10.1039/d0nr06621d (DOI)2-s2.0-85099240874 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Vetenskapsrådet, VR, VR 2013-04384; Funding details: Centre for Nano and Soft Matter Sciences, CeNS; Funding text 1: We thank the ILL for the provision of neutron beam time on FIGARO (DOI:10.5291/ILL-DATA.9-10-1487 and 10.5291/ ILL-DATA.9-10-1515), and ANSTO for the provision of XRR beam time on Platypus (Proposal: P6419). M. R. and E. B. acknowledge support from the Swedish Research Council via grant VR 2013-04384. P. M. B. acknowledges funding from the Excellence Cluster Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and the Center for NanoScience (CeNS). We thank Deborah Wakeham, Anna Oleshkevych, Adrian Rennie, and Philippe Fontaine for useful discussions.

Available from: 2021-01-26 Created: 2021-01-26 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8935-8070

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