Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Brännvall, ElisabetORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8992-3623
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 22) Show all publications
Abitbol, T., Kubat, M., Brännvall, E., Kotov, N., Johnson, C. M., Nizamov, R., . . . Guerreiro, M. P. (2023). Isolation of Mixed Compositions of Cellulose Nanocrystals, Microcrystalline Cellulose, and Lignin Nanoparticles from Wood Pulps. ACS Omega, 8(24), 21474-21484
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Isolation of Mixed Compositions of Cellulose Nanocrystals, Microcrystalline Cellulose, and Lignin Nanoparticles from Wood Pulps
Show others...
2023 (English)In: ACS Omega, E-ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 8, no 24, p. 21474-21484Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

From a circular economy perspective, one-pot strategies for the isolation of cellulose nanomaterials at a high yield and with multifunctional properties are attractive. Here, the effects of lignin content (bleached vs unbleached softwood kraft pulp) and sulfuric acid concentration on the properties of crystalline lignocellulose isolates and their films are explored. Hydrolysis at 58 wt % sulfuric acid resulted in both cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and microcrystalline cellulose at a relatively high yield (>55%), whereas hydrolysis at 64 wt % gave CNCs at a lower yield (<20%). CNCs from 58 wt % hydrolysis were more polydisperse and had a higher average aspect ratio (1.5-2×), a lower surface charge (2×), and a higher shear viscosity (100-1000×). Hydrolysis of unbleached pulp additionally yielded spherical nanoparticles (NPs) that were <50 nm in diameter and identified as lignin by nanoscale Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and IR imaging. Chiral nematic self-organization was observed in films from CNCs isolated at 64 wt % but not from the more heterogeneous CNC qualities produced at 58 wt %. All films degraded to some extent under simulated sunlight trials, but these effects were less pronounced in lignin-NP-containing films, suggesting a protective feature, but the hemicellulose content and CNC crystallinity may be implicated as well. Finally, heterogeneous CNC compositions obtained at a high yield and with improved resource efficiency are suggested for specific nanocellulose uses, for instance, as thickeners or reinforcing fillers, representing a step toward the development of application-tailored CNC grades. © 2023 The Authors. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society, 2023
National Category
Biochemicals
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-65709 (URN)10.1021/acsomega.3c00295 (DOI)2-s2.0-85162876606 (Scopus ID)
Note

This research was funded by the RISE RP18 Nanocellulose Research Program, the RISE Nanocellulose Competence Platform, and the Tandem Forest Values Program “SUBSTAINABLE” project (Formas grant number 2019-02508).

Available from: 2023-08-09 Created: 2023-08-09 Last updated: 2024-03-13Bibliographically approved
Esteves, C., Brännvall, E., Stevanic Srndovic, J. & Larsson, P. T. (2023). Pulp delignification and refining: impact on the supramolecular structure of softwood fibers. Cellulose, 30(16), 10453-10468
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pulp delignification and refining: impact on the supramolecular structure of softwood fibers
2023 (English)In: Cellulose, ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 30, no 16, p. 10453-10468Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The effect on softwood fiber wall nanostructure of kraft cooking, oxygen delignification and refining was evaluated by X-ray scattering. A recently developed simulation method for modelling small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data was used to estimate the apparent average sizes of solids (AAPS) and interstitial spaces in the fiber wall (AACS). Fiber saturation point and wide angle X-ray scattering were also used to calculate the pore volume in the fiber wall and the crystallite size of the fibril, respectively. The experimental modelled SAXS data was able to give consistent values for each kraft-cooked and oxygen-delignified pulp. Kraft delignification seems to have the major influence on the fiber nanostructure modification, while oxygen delignification has little or no significant impact even for different kappa numbers. The particle sizes values were more stable than the cavities sizes and no significant differences were seen between different delignification processes, refining or delignification degree. Pulps evaluated after PFI-refining, showed an increase in the fiber wall porosity evaluated by FSP and an increase in the interstitial spaces in the fiber wall, while the crystallite size and the particle sizes were very little or not affected at all. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Science and Business Media B.V., 2023
Keywords
Delignification; Fibers; Kraft Papers; Oxygen; Particle Size; Refining; Softwoods; Walls; Crystallite size; Fibers; Nanostructures; Oxygen; Particle size; Pulp refining; Softwoods; X ray scattering; Fiber wall; FSP; Interstitial space; Kraft cooking; Oxygen delignifications; Particles sizes; Scattering data; Small angle X-ray scattering; Softwood fibers; WAXS; Delignification
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-67940 (URN)10.1007/s10570-023-05490-4 (DOI)2-s2.0-85171308873 (Scopus ID)
Note

Open access funding provided by RISE Research Institutes of Sweden. ‘Stiftelsen Nils och Dorthi Troëdssons forskningsfond’ are gratefully acknowledged for funding; application 1039/2021.

Available from: 2023-11-27 Created: 2023-11-27 Last updated: 2023-11-27Bibliographically approved
Bengtsson, A., Landmér, A., Norberg, L., Yu, S., Ek, M., Brännvall, E. & Sedin, M. (2022). Carbon Fibers from Wet-Spun Cellulose-Lignin Precursors Using the Cold Alkali Process. Fibers, 10(12), Article ID 108.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbon Fibers from Wet-Spun Cellulose-Lignin Precursors Using the Cold Alkali Process
Show others...
2022 (English)In: Fibers, ISSN 2079-6439, Vol. 10, no 12, article id 108Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent years, there has been extensive research into the development of cheaper and more sustainable carbon fiber (CF) precursors, and air-gap-spun cellulose-lignin precursors have gained considerable attention where ionic liquids have been used for the co-dissolution of cellulose and lignin. However, ionic liquids are expensive and difficult to recycle. In the present work, an aqueous solvent system, cold alkali, was used to prepare cellulose-lignin CF precursors by wet spinning solutions containing co-dissolved dissolving-grade kraft pulp and softwood kraft lignin. Precursors containing up to 30 wt% lignin were successfully spun using two different coagulation bath compositions, where one of them introduced a flame retardant into the precursor to increase the CF conversion yield. The precursors were converted to CFs via batchwise and continuous conversion. The precursor and conversion conditions had a significant effect on the conversion yield (12–44 wt%), the Young’s modulus (33–77 GPa), and the tensile strength (0.48–1.17 GPa), while the precursor morphology was preserved. Structural characterization of the precursors and CFs showed that a more oriented and crystalline precursor gave a more ordered CF structure with higher tensile properties. The continuous conversion trials highlighted the importance of tension control to increase the mechanical properties of the CFs. © 2022 by the authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
bio-based, carbon fiber, cellulose, cold alkali, lignin
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-62581 (URN)10.3390/fib10120108 (DOI)2-s2.0-85144640702 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: 2018-06378; Funding details: Chalmers Tekniska Högskola; Funding text 1: The authors express their gratitude to Treesearch and Anita Teleman (RISE AB) as well as to Nataliia Mozhzhukhina (Chalmers University of Technology) for providing support with the WAXS and Raman analyzes, respectively. Shun Yu acknowledges the Swedish Research Council VR (grant No. 2018-06378) for financial support.; Funding text 2: The authors express their gratitude to Treesearch and Anita Teleman (RISE AB) as well as to Nataliia Mozhzhukhina (Chalmers University of Technology) for providing support with the WAXS and Raman analyzes, respectively. Shun Yu acknowledges the Swedish Research Council VR (grant No. 2018-06378) for financial support.

Available from: 2023-01-20 Created: 2023-01-20 Last updated: 2023-06-08Bibliographically approved
Brännvall, E. & Aulin, C. (2022). CNFs from softwood pulp fibers containing hemicellulose and lignin. Cellulose
Open this publication in new window or tab >>CNFs from softwood pulp fibers containing hemicellulose and lignin
2022 (English)In: Cellulose, ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882XArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The energy demand to produce cellulose nanofibrils, CNFs, is high and additionally the cost of the starting material, the pulp, is substantial as high purity cellulose dissolving pulp is generally used. Pulps aimed for board and paper are produced at higher yield as they contain hemicelluloses and, in the case of unbleached pulp, lignin, and would be a more economical starting material for CNFs. It is of interest to understand how the presence of hemicellulose and lignin affects the fibrillation process and CNF properties. Kraft cooks of softwood were performed as well as kraft cooks with addition of polysulfide to increase the hemicellulose content. Part of the pulps were bleached to remove residual lignin, thus making it possible to compare pulps with and without lignin. Higher amount of hemicellulose had an obstructive effect on the enzymatic pre-treatment whereas lignin had no adverse effect on enzyme accessibility. Increased amount of charged groups improved the accessibility for enzymes. Both hemicellulose and lignin were carboxymethylated when pre-treatment by carboxymethylation was employed. However, carboxymethylation partly dissolved hemicelluloses. The tensile strength of CNF films was independent of the chemical composition of the pulp and the pre-treatment strategy. However, since the enzymatic pre-treatment decreased the cellulose DP more, CNF films from enzymatically pre-treated pulps had generally lower tensile strength. © 2022, The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Science and Business Media B.V., 2022
Keywords
Carboxymethylation, CNF film, Enzymatic pretreatment, Nanocellulose, Bleaching, Cellulose films, Dissolution, Enzymes, Lignin, Softwoods, Cellulose nanofibrils, Energy demands, High purity, Kraft cook, Pre-treatments, Pulp fibers, Softwood Pulps, Tensile strength
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-59238 (URN)10.1007/s10570-022-04585-8 (DOI)2-s2.0-85129726430 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding text 1: The authors would like to acknowledge the partners of RISE Bioeconomy research program on nanocellulose; Stora Enso, Holmen, Suzano, Södra, Performance Biofilaments, Fortum and BillerudKorsnäs, for financial contribution.

Available from: 2022-05-24 Created: 2022-05-24 Last updated: 2022-05-24Bibliographically approved
Bengtsson, A., Bengtsson, J., Jedvert, K., Kakkonen, M., Tanhuanpää, O., Brännvall, E. & Sedin, M. (2022). Continuous Stabilization and Carbonization of a Lignin-Cellulose Precursor to Carbon Fiber. ACS Omega, 7(19), 16793-16802
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Continuous Stabilization and Carbonization of a Lignin-Cellulose Precursor to Carbon Fiber
Show others...
2022 (English)In: ACS Omega, E-ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 7, no 19, p. 16793-16802Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The demand for carbon fibers (CFs) based on renewable raw materials as the reinforcing fiber in composites for lightweight applications is growing. Lignin-cellulose precursor fibers (PFs) are a promising alternative, but so far, there is limited knowledge of how to continuously convert these PFs under industrial-like conditions into CFs. Continuous conversion is vital for the industrial production of CFs. In this work, we have compared the continuous conversion of lignin-cellulose PFs (50 wt % softwood kraft lignin and 50 wt % dissolving-grade kraft pulp) with batchwise conversion. The PFs were successfully stabilized and carbonized continuously over a total time of 1.0-1.5 h, comparable to the industrial production of CFs from polyacrylonitrile. CFs derived continuously at 1000 °C with a relative stretch of-10% (fiber contraction) had a conversion yield of 29 wt %, a diameter of 12-15 μm, a Young's modulus of 46-51 GPa, and a tensile strength of 710-920 MPa. In comparison, CFs obtained at 1000 °C via batchwise conversion (12-15 μm diameter) with a relative stretch of 0% and a conversion time of 7 h (due to the low heating and cooling rates) had a higher conversion yield of 34 wt %, a higher Young's modulus (63-67 GPa) but a similar tensile strength (800-920 MPa). This suggests that the Young's modulus can be improved by the optimization of the fiber tension, residence time, and temperature profile during continuous conversion, while a higher tensile strength can be achieved by reducing the fiber diameter as it minimizes the risk of critical defects. © 2022 The Authors. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society, 2022
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-59348 (URN)10.1021/acsomega.2c01806 (DOI)2-s2.0-85130062725 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: European Regional Development Fund, ERDF; Funding text 1: The authors wish to express their gratitude to Södra Foundation for Research, Development and Education and Project Lignocity, funded by the European Regional Development Fund, for providing financial support.

Available from: 2022-06-14 Created: 2022-06-14 Last updated: 2023-07-06Bibliographically approved
Esteves, C., Brännvall, E., Östlund, S. & Sevastyanova, O. (2022). The effects of high alkali impregnation and oxygen delignification of softwood kraft pulps on the yield and mechanical properties. Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, 37(2), 223-231
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of high alkali impregnation and oxygen delignification of softwood kraft pulps on the yield and mechanical properties
2022 (English)In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 223-231Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated whether the yield improvement after high alkali impregnation (HAI) is maintained after oxygen delignification and whether the potential of oxygen delignification to increase the mechanical properties is affected by high alkali impregnation. The yield improvement achieved by high alkali impregnation (1 %) was preserved after oxygen delignification, particularly of glucomannan. The total fiber charge and swelling increased after oxygen delignification regardless of the type of impregnation in the cooking step. The tensile index improvement obtained by oxygen delignification was retained if this was preceded by high alkali impregnation. The stiffness index was higher and elongation slightly lower after HAI impregnation than after a standard (REF) impregnation. Fibers obtained through high alkali impregnation seem to be slightly less deformed and slightly wider than fibers obtained after a standard impregnation. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
De Gruyter Open Ltd, 2022
Keywords
curl index, fiber charge, glucomannans, kraft cooking, tensile index, Delignification, Fibers, Kraft pulp, Oxygen, Alkali impregnation, Curl indices, Fibre charge, Glucomannan, Oxygen delignifications, Softwood kraft pulps, Yield Improvement, Impregnation, Tensile Strength
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-59327 (URN)10.1515/npprj-2022-0022 (DOI)2-s2.0-85129892544 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-06-13 Created: 2022-06-13 Last updated: 2022-06-13Bibliographically approved
Esteves, C., Sevastyanova, O., Östlund, S. & Brännvall, E. (2022). The impact of bleaching on the yield of softwood kraft pulps obtained by high alkali impregnation: Bleaching and high alkali impregnation impact. Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, 37(4), 593-608
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of bleaching on the yield of softwood kraft pulps obtained by high alkali impregnation: Bleaching and high alkali impregnation impact
2022 (English)In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 593-608Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High alkali impregnation (HAI) increases the total yield of softwood pulps following kraft cooking. This yield improvement is also maintained after oxygen delignification. This study evaluates how bleaching with either chlorine dioxide or hydrogen peroxide affects the final yield of samples obtained with standard and HAI. The chemical composition, viscosity, brightness, mechanical and morphological properties were studied. Compared to cooking after standard impregnation the yield improvement achieved by HAI was preserved in both types of bleaching sequences (2 % units for chlorine dioxide and 4 % units for hydrogen peroxide). The introduction of charged groups into the cellulose fibers was higher with hydrogen peroxide bleaching than with chlorine dioxide however, no significant impact was seen on the swelling or mechanical properties. The brightness was higher for the pulps bleached with chlorine dioxide compared with hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide bleaching resulted in similar brightness development for both standard and HAI. Fibers bleached with chlorine dioxide had the highest curl index (16-17 %) compared to the fibers bleached with hydrogen peroxide (15 %). © 2022 the author(s)

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
De Gruyter Open Ltd, 2022
Keywords
brightness, curl index, fiber charge, morphology, tensile index, Cleaning, Delignification, Fibers, Hydrogen peroxide, Impregnation, Kraft pulp, Luminance, Oxidation, Softwoods, Alkali impregnation, Curl indices, Fibre charge, Hydrogen peroxide bleaching, Kraft cooking, Softwood kraft pulps, Softwood Pulps, Total yield, Yield Improvement, Bleaching
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-60545 (URN)10.1515/npprj-2022-0035 (DOI)2-s2.0-85138856693 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding statement: The authors gratefully acknowledge the STFI Intressentförening and Södra Forskningsstiftelse for financial support. The Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, the WWSC Program and the Wood and Pulping Chemistry Research Network (WPCRN) at KTH are gratefully acknowledged for financial support for Dr. Sevastyanova.

Available from: 2022-10-19 Created: 2022-10-19 Last updated: 2023-07-06Bibliographically approved
Brännvall, E. & Rönnols, J. (2021). Analysis of entrapped and free liquor to gain new insights into kraft pulping. Cellulose, 28, 2403-2418
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analysis of entrapped and free liquor to gain new insights into kraft pulping
2021 (English)In: Cellulose, ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 28, p. 2403-2418Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most of our knowledge on kraft pulping comes from studies on dissolved lignin in the freely drainable black liquor and isolated residual lignin in pulp. However, entrapped liquor in the delignified chips has been shown to differ significantly from the free liquor. The present study has compared three liquor fractions: free, lumen and fiber wall liquor. The free liquor was obtained by draining the delignified chips, the lumen liquor was separated by centrifugation and the fiber wall liquor by subsequent leaching. The liquor in the fiber wall had the lowest concentration of lignin and hydrosulfide ions and the highest concentration of monovalent cations. The dissolved lignin in the fiber wall liquor had the highest molar mass and the highest content of xylan. The highest concentration of dissolved lignin was in the liquor filling the lumen cavities. The lignin in the free liquor had the lowest molar mass and the lowest content of lignin structures containing β-O-4 linkages and aliphatic hydroxyl groups. The lowest mass transfer rate of dissolved lignin was from the lumen liquor to the free liquor probably restricted by the tortuosity of the chip. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Science and Business Media B.V., 2021
Keywords
Delignification, Lignin, Mass transfer, Non-process elements, Softwood, Dissolution, Fibers, Kraft pulp, Aliphatic hydroxyl groups, Black liquor, Dissolved lignin, Fiber wall, Lignin structure, Mass transfer rate, Monovalent cations, Residual lignins
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-52442 (URN)10.1007/s10570-020-03651-3 (DOI)2-s2.0-85100177062 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-02-18 Created: 2021-02-18 Last updated: 2023-05-22Bibliographically approved
Brännvall, E., Larsson, P. T. & Stevanic Srndovic, J. (2021). Changes in the cellulose fiber wall supramolecular structure during the initial stages of chemical treatments of wood evaluated by NMR and X-ray scattering. Cellulose, 28, 3951-3965
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in the cellulose fiber wall supramolecular structure during the initial stages of chemical treatments of wood evaluated by NMR and X-ray scattering
2021 (English)In: Cellulose, ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 28, p. 3951-3965Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The effect of initial stages of pulping of spruce, resembling prehydrolysis and alkaline cooking was studied using CP/MAS 13C-NMR, X-ray scattering, FSP and carbohydrate composition in order to study the impact of the pre-treatments on the fiber wall nanostructure. Removal of fiber wall components, hemicellulose and lignin, increased the fiber wall porosity and induced cellulose fibril aggregation. The effect of temperature and pH in the treatment on cellulose fibril aggregate size appears to be secondary. It is the removal of hemicellulose that has a profound effect on the supramolecular structure of the cellulose fiber wall. As the amount of hemicellulose dissolved from wood increases, the fibril aggregate size determined by NMR increases as well, ranging from 16 to 28 nm. Specifically, a good correlation between the amount of glucomannan in the fiber wall and the fibril aggregate size is seen. The lower the amount of glucomannan, the larger the aggregate size. Glucomannan thus seems to prevent aggregation as it acts as a very efficient spacer between fibrils. Elemental fibril size determined by NMR, was quite similar for all samples, ranging from 3.6 to 4.1 nm. By combining measurement methods, a more well-resolved picture of the structural changes occurring during was obtained. © 2021, The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Science and Business Media B.V., 2021
Keywords
Fiber wall porosity, Fibril aggregation, FSP, Hemicellulose, Lignin, Aggregates, Alkalinity, Cellulose, Nanostructures, Pulp cooking, Supramolecular chemistry, Textile fibers, X ray scattering, Alkaline cooking, Carbohydrate compositions, Cellulose fibrils, Chemical treatments, Effect of temperature, Good correlations, Measurement methods, Supramolecular structure, Wood
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-52610 (URN)10.1007/s10570-021-03790-1 (DOI)2-s2.0-85102297443 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-03-18 Created: 2021-03-18 Last updated: 2023-05-22Bibliographically approved
Esteves, C., Sevastyanova, O., Östlund, S. & Brännvall, E. (2021). Differences and similarities between kraft and oxygen delignification of softwood fibers: effects on chemical and physical properties. Cellulose, 28(5), 3149-3167
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences and similarities between kraft and oxygen delignification of softwood fibers: effects on chemical and physical properties
2021 (English)In: Cellulose, ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 3149-3167Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The fiber properties after oxygen delignification and kraft pulping were studied by looking into the chemical characteristics and morphology. The effect of the two processes on the fibers was evaluated and compared over a wider kappa number range (from 62 down to15). Wide-angle X-ray scattering, nuclear magnetic resonance and fiber saturation point were used to characterize the fiber network structure. Fiber morphology and fiber dislocations were evaluated by an optical image analysis. The total and surface fiber charges were studied by conductometric and polyelectrolyte titrations. The fiber wall supramolecular structure, such as crystallinity, size of fibril aggregates, pore size and pore volume, were similar for the two processes. The selectivity, in terms of carbohydrate yield, was equal for kraft cooking and oxygen delignification, but the selectivity in terms of viscosity loss per amount of delignification is poorer for oxygen delignification. Clearly more fiber deformations (2–6% units in curl index) in the fibers after oxygen delignification were seen. Introduction of curl depended on the physical state of the fibers, i.e. liberated or in wood matrix. In the pulping stage, the fiber continue to be supported by neighboring fibers, as the delignified chips maintain their form. However, in the subsequent oxygen stage the fibers enter in the form of pulp (liberated fibers), which makes them more susceptible to changes in fiber form. Graphic abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.] © 2021, The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Science and Business Media B.V., 2021
Keywords
Curl, Deformations, Fiber charge, Fiber vulnerability, Selectivity, Water retention value, Crystallinity, Delignification, Fibers, Geometrical optics, Kraft pulp, Morphology, Oxygen, Polyelectrolytes, Pore size, X ray scattering, Chemical and physical properties, Chemical characteristic, Fiber deformation, Fiber saturation points, Optical image analysis, Oxygen delignifications, Polyelectrolyte titration, Supramolecular structure, Wood
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-52901 (URN)10.1007/s10570-021-03713-0 (DOI)2-s2.0-85101488810 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Wallenberg Wood Science Center, WWSC; Funding text 1: The authors in this paper would like to thanks Jasna Srndovic for the NMR and WAXS measurements. The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support received from STFI's Intressentförening and Önnesjöstiftelsen. The Wallenberg Wood Science Center (WWSC) funded by Knut and Alice Wallenberg (KAW) Foundation and the Wood and Pulping Chemistry Research Network (WPCRN) at KTH are gratefully acknowledged for financial support for Dr. Sevastyanova.

Available from: 2021-04-23 Created: 2021-04-23 Last updated: 2022-05-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8992-3623

Search in DiVA

Show all publications