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Fogelberg, E., Kolbeinsson, A., Kurdve, M., Mattsson, S., Salunkhe, O., Thorvald, P. & Thuresson, U. (2024). Current and best practices in information presentation.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Current and best practices in information presentation
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2024 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Digitalization and automation in industry can have both positive and negative effects on social sustainability. On one hand it can be a basis for monotonous, uncreative, and even dangerous workplaces and in some cases might even result in people losing their work. On the other hand, it can be a base for ergonomically sound and inclusive work, engaging everyone in improvements. This project aims for moving the focus on positive effects for social sustainability while still staying cost efficient and effective in economic and ecologic sustainability for digitalization and automation of work instructions and training in manual operations like assembly, machine operation & setup, maintenance, and material handling. The Industry 4.0 paradigm offers radically increased opportunities for doing just that. For example, increased digitization can create efficiency improvements through shorter lead times and reduced disruptions to production. New generations of technology and software as well as information dissemination can be accelerated and the traceability of products and materials in the industrial systems can be greatly increased. Digitization also provides opportunities to increase industrial resilience to challenges coming from elsewhere, such as demographic change and climate threats. Advanced application of digitization is seen by industries and decision-makers as the most important enabler for achieving the strategic sustainability goals and Agenda2030. A crucial factor for competitiveness is the human contribution. Here too, digitalisation is radically changing the conditions. In the last 20 years, work instructions have been transformed from printed text on paper into an increasingly digital representation. As knowledge increases about how work instructions for the manufacturing industry should be designed, they are rarely designed according to user conditions. At best, this results in a missed opportunity for performance improvements and at worst, it could potentially result in quality deficiencies, efficiency deficiencies and a lower degree of inclusion of staff groups. Digitization and automation permeate both society and industry more and more and there are many different technologies on the market. These can contribute to both increased efficiency and flexibility for the industry. However, there are a lot of challenges to both implement, design, and use instructions. Studies conducted in industry 2014–2018 show that operators and assembly workers only use instructions in 20–25% of cases in the operational phase when they are perceived as inefficient (Fast-Berglund & Stahre, 2013; Mattsson et al., 2018). Of course, this also increases the risks of, for example, assembly errors by not using instructions to the extent that they should be used. The corporate culture and standards are also an important part of how instructions are created and used. Depending on the structure and condition of the company and the production unit, for example, an assembly instruction at one company may include information about the product, process, and work environment, while an assembly instruction at another company includes completely different or only parts of this information. Of course, this is a natural consequence of sometimes far-inherited corporate cultures and traditions, but experience has also shown that it is to a very large extent the nature of work that defines the type of support system needed. In line with increased automation and increasing product variation as a result of increased customisation, operators’ tasks will require more creative work than before where the aim is to enable and handle the results of individual workers' creative thoughts about improvements in their own work situation, increasing cognitive load (Taylor et al., 2020). The development of digitalisation has created new opportunities for improved communication among employees in the manufacturing industry (Oesterreich & Teuteberg, 2016). Therefore, this technological development can and should support operators cognitively (Kaasinen et al., 2020; Mattsson et al., 2016). Although many new digital technologies are being developed and are available (Romero et al., 2016), it is still difficult to implement these so that people's cognitive work is supported. This is often due to the fact that the implementation does not take place in a way that people are comfortable with (Parasuraman & Riley, 1997). In many cases, humans are expected to adapt to technology and not the other way around (Thorvald et al., 2021). To implement better support for their operators, companies should focus on identifying the information needs that exist (Haghi et al., 2018) and then visualize it in a way that is useful to operators. The central aim for the project is to demonstrate how knowledge and systematic development of cognitive support and information design can increase quality and flexibility in future production and how this can be considered in the implementation of digital work instructions. In the industrial case studies, current state-of-practice in information presentation will be investigated and analysed together with state-of-the art knowledge and technology to map successful efforts in industry, identify what it is that makes them successful, or how a particularly challenging situation can be further improved through our knowledge of cognitive work in production.

Series
RISE Rapport ; 2024:5
Keywords
instructions, digitalisation, learning.
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-70097 (URN)978-91-89896-46-8 (ISBN)
Note

First year report of DIGITALIS1 (DIGITAL work InStructions for cognitive work)1The project is funded by Swedish innovation agency Vinnova through the strategic innovation program Produktion2030. The following partners are included in DIGITALIS: Skövde University, Research Institutes of Sweden, Chalmers University of Technology, Husmuttern AB, SAAB AB, Volvo Powertrain, Swegon AB, CEJN AB, Hitech & Development Wireless Sweden and ESI Group.

Available from: 2024-01-17 Created: 2024-01-17 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Kurdve, M., Zackrisson, M., Tettey, U. & Gustavsson, C. (2024). FKG method for collecting data and calculation of climate footprint forcomponents supplied to the automotive industry.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>FKG method for collecting data and calculation of climate footprint forcomponents supplied to the automotive industry
2024 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Th is method is developed for the purpose of helping suppliers to the automotive industry present a potential climate footprint of their proposed products to their customers in a quotation stage. The supplier/producer company is responsible for making a complete inventory of all inputs and outputs of the proposed product in accordance with the D ata C o llection T emplate. The method is based on the modelling of a climate footprint for a fictive average product, that can be used to present an estimated potential climate footprint for future product offers. Th e method was developed as integral parts of a climate footprint project coordinated by FKG, representing Swedish automotive component suppliers. The project resulted in this method, including an inventory tool to be used by supplier s to collect data and an average product model and calculator to estimate a potential clim ate footprint of the suppliers products. The inventory data includes information on supplied materials (types and qualities), transportation ( volume , mode, and distance), and energy sources (types and suppliers) used in production during 2021 or 2022 . This data can be used in simulations for future products. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) consultants utilize the inventory to construct a simplified cradle to gate model in software tools like SimaPro, LCA for Experts (formerly GaBi )), or other LCA modelling software tool . This model, which employs a “simple cut off for recycled input materials and recyclable materials from production (“simple cut off” according to Ekvall et al. 2020 as recommended by EPD International see further chapter 2 and 3 for scope and modelling )), either utilizes certified climate data (e. EPDs) from sub suppliers or, more commonly, relies on general Ecoinvent data for materials and energy. A simplified LCA model for the average product from the previous year is documented and serves as the baseline for the calculation . Subsequently, a calculator is developed that can simulate a climate footprint for production of a new product in the factory based on the production volume and material mix from the previous year. In the calculator, the climate footprint of the 'core' for each main process and subprocess is treated as fixed factors proportional to the weight of the product. The upstream part treats the raw material mix (bill of materials) as a variable that can be adjusted for each product, where each raw material has specific materials) as a variable that can be adjusted for each product, where each raw material has specific climate footprint factorsclimate footprint factors.. Validation of the Validation of the method method toto developdevelop an an averageaverage--productproduct--model and the calculator is carried out by model and the calculator is carried out by a a validation bodyvalidation body.. In this first version of the methodIn this first version of the method, , the validation body is the validation body is RISE. The validation proRISE. The validation programgram builds on builds on review of review of assumed dataassumed data andand confirms the use of reasonabconfirms the use of reasonable and le and sufficient sufficient data for thedata for the simplifiedsimplified LCALCA modelmodel. The validation program. The validation program does not verify does not verify thatthat the bill of materials the bill of materials andand bill of bill of processes processes are sufficient are sufficient to produce to produce the the product/product/component butcomponent but validates the reasonableness of thvalidates the reasonableness of this is datadata..

Publisher
p. 16
Series
RISE Rapport ; 2024:11
National Category
Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-71723 (URN)978 91 89896 53 6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2024-02-13 Created: 2024-02-13 Last updated: 2024-05-15Bibliographically approved
Chen, X., Kurdve, M., Johansson, B. & Despeisse, M. (2023). Enabling the twin transitions: Digital technologies support environmental sustainability through lean principles. Sustainable Production and Consumption, 38, 13-27
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enabling the twin transitions: Digital technologies support environmental sustainability through lean principles
2023 (English)In: Sustainable Production and Consumption, ISSN 2352-5509, Vol. 38, p. 13-27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Manufacturing companies seek innovative approaches to achieve successful Green and Digital transitions, where adopting lean production is one alternative. However, further investigation is required to formulate the strategy with practical inputs and identify what digital technologies could be applied with which lean principles for environmental benefits. Therefore, this study first conducted a case study in three companies to collect practice-based data. A complementary literature review was then carried out, investigating the existing frameworks and complementing practices of digitalized lean implementations and the resulting environmental impact. Consequently, the Internet of Things and related connection-level technologies were identified as the key facilitators in lean implementations, specifically in visualization, communication, and poka-yoke, leading to environmental benefits. Furthermore, a framework of DIgitalization Supports Environmental sustainability through Lean principles (DISEL) was proposed to help manufacturing companies identify the opportunities of digitalizing lean principles for Environmental sustainability, thus enabling the twin transitions and being resilient. © 2023 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2023
Keywords
Digital technologies, Digitalization, Environmental sustainability, Industry 4.0, Lean production, Production system, Resilience, Twin transitions, Agile manufacturing systems, Environmental impact, Environmental technology, Sustainable development, Environmental benefits, Lean implementation, Lean principles, Manufacturing companies, Twin transition
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-64313 (URN)10.1016/j.spc.2023.03.020 (DOI)2-s2.0-85151404805 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding details: 2022-01704; Funding details: European Commission, EC, 101058384; Funding details: Chalmers Tekniska Högskola; Funding text 1: This research was conducted with AoA Production at Chalmers University of Technology and RISE Excellence in Production Research (XPRES). It was partly funded by Vinnova's Production 2030 program in the project Scarce II and PLENUM (2022-01704) and partly by the EU in the project RE4DY (101058384). The support is greatly appreciated.; Funding text 2: This research was conducted with AoA Production at Chalmers University of Technology and RISE Excellence in Production Research (XPRES). It was partly funded by Vinnova 's Production 2030 program in the project Scarce II and PLENUM ( 2022-01704 ) and partly by the EU in the project RE4DY ( 101058384 ). The support is greatly appreciated.

Available from: 2023-05-08 Created: 2023-05-08 Last updated: 2023-05-08Bibliographically approved
Mattsson, S., Kurdve, M., Almström, P. & Skagert, K. (2023). Framework for universal design of digital support and workplace design in industry. international journal of manufacturing research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Framework for universal design of digital support and workplace design in industry
2023 (English)In: international journal of manufacturing researchArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper is to propose a framework for universal design of manual assembly workplaces. Workplaces that are adapted to different individuals, regardless of gender, language, background and functional variations, also support the fundamental goals of the Industry 5.0 concept and an accessible, safer, productive and error-proof work environment. The study included: 1) a qualitative study on key factors for universal design and comparison with universal design theory; 2) improvement suggestions to the company based on observations, interviews and theory; 3) a framework for universal design. The framework included the following areas: personalisation and context, activities/tasks and output, and methods/standards and factors were suggested so that companies could start their analysis work for the design. The study resulted in new insights and empirics regarding universal workplace design.

National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-68622 (URN)
Available from: 2023-12-19 Created: 2023-12-19 Last updated: 2023-12-19Bibliographically approved
Chavez, Z. Z., Arvidsson, A., Hauge, J. B., Bellgran, M., Birkie, S. E., Johnson, P. & Kurdve, M. (2023). From Surviving to Thriving: Industry 5.0 at SMEs Enhancing Production Flexibility. In: IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology. Volume 689 AICT, Pages 789 - 802: . Paper presented at IFIP WG 5.7 International Conference on Advances in Production Management Systems, APMS 2023. Trondheim, Norway. 17 September 2023 through 21 September 2023 (pp. 789-802). Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH, 689 AICT
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Surviving to Thriving: Industry 5.0 at SMEs Enhancing Production Flexibility
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2023 (English)In: IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology. Volume 689 AICT, Pages 789 - 802, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2023, Vol. 689 AICT, p. 789-802Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This study explores how human-centered digitalization can contribute to the flexibility and adaptability of small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) production processes, resulting in more resilient systems. This study explains the relationship between digital technologies and production system features through progressively more human-centric stages of a digitalized manufacturing system. The authors present a case study of an SME that implemented a human-centric strategy, placing people’s needs and interests at the center of its processes, leading to more flexible and inclusive production processes and consistent with the goals of Industry 5.0. The results suggest that a digitalized working method that considers human capabilities and needs can enable a more diverse workforce and the rapid setup of new and additional production processes, thus helping SMEs respond to supply chain disruptions. The findings have implications for managers and practitioners interested in driving or supporting the transition of SMEs to human-centric, resilient, and sustainable businesses. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH, 2023
Keywords
Industrial management, Adaptability; Digital technologies; Enterprise production; Flexibility; Human-centric; Human-centric production; Production flexibility; Production process; Resilient systems; Small and medium-sized enterprise, Supply chains
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-68626 (URN)10.1007/978-3-031-43662-8_56 (DOI)2-s2.0-85172420082 (Scopus ID)
Conference
IFIP WG 5.7 International Conference on Advances in Production Management Systems, APMS 2023. Trondheim, Norway. 17 September 2023 through 21 September 2023
Note

This work was partially supported by Production2030 and Sweden’s Government Agency for Innovation VINNOVA Programme, RESPIRE project [grant number 2021– 03685], and Marie SkłodowskaCurie Actions (MSCA), SME 5.0 project [grant agreement ID 101086487]. The authors thankfully acknowledge the support of the case company and project partners.

Available from: 2023-12-19 Created: 2023-12-19 Last updated: 2023-12-20Bibliographically approved
Birkie, S. E., Chavez, Z. Z., Lindahl, E., Kurdve, M., Bruch, J., Bellgran, M., . . . Elvin, M. (2023). Systematic Green Design in Production Equipment Investments: Conceptual Development and Outlook. Paper presented at IFIP WG 5.7 International Conference on Advances in Production Management Systems, APMS 2023. Trondheim, Norway. 17 September 2023 through 21 September 2023. IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, 692 AICT, 174-188
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Systematic Green Design in Production Equipment Investments: Conceptual Development and Outlook
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2023 (English)In: IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, ISSN 1868-4238, Vol. 692 AICT, p. 174-188Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper explores the concept of green design in the context of production, focusing on investment projects for production equipment design and acquisition by a manufacturing firm. Research towards making manufacturing and production related activities more sustainable is increasing. In the manufacturing sector, environmental sustainability tends to be more commonly approached from the operations perspective. However, the decisions taken in the design phase of the production equipment significantly impact the operations phase. Therefore, proactive design approaches for sustainability applied in product design settings could be transferred to the design of the production equipment to build in green aspects from the outset. This study explores the research questions of what green production equipment design entails and how the concept of green design has evolved in the context of production. Overall, this conceptual paper highlights the importance of incorporating green design principles from the outset of the production design. Transferable methodological issues are also explored for further detailed investigation in the production equipment design context. Strong collaboration between equipment suppliers and the buying manufacturer that aims to integrate sustainability as part of requirements is proposed as an enabler for the way forward. The paper also provides insights into the evolution of the concept in this context for possible future research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH, 2023
Keywords
Industrial research; Product design; Sustainable development; Conceptual development; Design phase; Environmental sustainability; Equipment acquisition; Equipment design; Equipment investment; Investment programmes; Manufacturing firms; Manufacturing sector; Production equipments; Ecodesign
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-67685 (URN)10.1007/978-3-031-43688-8_13 (DOI)2-s2.0-85174435182 (Scopus ID)
Conference
IFIP WG 5.7 International Conference on Advances in Production Management Systems, APMS 2023. Trondheim, Norway. 17 September 2023 through 21 September 2023
Available from: 2023-11-03 Created: 2023-11-03 Last updated: 2023-11-03Bibliographically approved
Lindahl, E., Kurdve, M. & Bellgran, M. (2022). How could a SME supplier's value chain be evaluated by circular production principles?. In: Procedia CIRP: . Paper presented at 29th CIRP Conference on Life Cycle Engineering, LCE 2022, 4 April 2022 through 6 April 2022 (pp. 648-653). Elsevier B.V., 105
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How could a SME supplier's value chain be evaluated by circular production principles?
2022 (English)In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier B.V. , 2022, Vol. 105, p. 648-653Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Increased demands for circularity in manufacturing industry put pressure on transformation in order to meet the Sustainable Development Goals. Small-and-medium-sized-enterprises (SME)'s have an important role, supplying value chains with material and components for larger companies and original-equipment-manufacturers (OEMs). SME suppliers' net environmental footprint contributes to the OEM's overall footprint, however, SME suppliers are characterized by limited resources and competence to perform circularity activities. SME net environmental footprint consists of both production related targets combined with product related targets. Circular product performance evaluation have raised a demand for easy-to-use, self-assisting tools as a complement or substitute for standardised life-cycle-assessment (LCA) methods, often considered as costly with advanced calculations, and highlights the need for the development of accessible tools and guides that support the SMEs' circularity work. An established industrial tool based on previous research called the Green Performance Map (GPM), has successfully been used to assist circularity performance in production operations. This paper sets out to test the GPM tool in a new setting, addressing circularity in an extended value chain context, including three main areas; production and sourcing, product use and product end-of-life. The research presented is based on an in-depth case study with an interactive research approach and aims to explore how to reach a full value chain perspective on circularity in production. The result indicates that a joint and inclusive collaboration centred on the adapted GPM-tool, identifies and structures circular production principles as well as product use and end-of-life performance as a basis for evaluation. Findings from research study show that a comprehensive input-output tool could be used with limited competence and time, achieve increased employee awareness of circularity in the product value chain. This single case study brings a small empirical contribution to existing literature on SME circular production transformation, however it clearly shows on the urgency to evaluate circularity along the value chain in order to support a full industrial circular production transformation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2022
Keywords
Circular Economy, GPM tool, Green Kaizen, Production Management, Production Operations, Industrial research, Manufacture, Petroleum reservoir evaluation, Sustainable development, Case-studies, Environmental footprints, Green performance map tool, Performance maps, Small and medium-sized enterprise, Value chains, Life cycle
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-59769 (URN)10.1016/j.procir.2022.02.108 (DOI)2-s2.0-85127515374 (Scopus ID)
Conference
29th CIRP Conference on Life Cycle Engineering, LCE 2022, 4 April 2022 through 6 April 2022
Available from: 2022-07-07 Created: 2022-07-07 Last updated: 2022-08-10Bibliographically approved
Shahbazi, S., van Loon, P., Kurdve, M. & Johansson, M. (2022). Metal and Plastic Recycling Flows in a Circular Value Chain. In: Klos, Zbigniew Stanislaw; Kalkowska, Joanna; Kasprzak, Jędrzej (Ed.), Towards a Sustainable Future - Life Cycle Management: Challenges and Prospects: (pp. 195-206). Cham: Springer International Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metal and Plastic Recycling Flows in a Circular Value Chain
2022 (English)In: Towards a Sustainable Future - Life Cycle Management: Challenges and Prospects / [ed] Klos, Zbigniew Stanislaw; Kalkowska, Joanna; Kasprzak, Jędrzej, Cham: Springer International Publishing , 2022, p. 195-206Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Material efficiency in manufacturing is an enabler of circular economy and captures value in industry through decreasing the amount of material used to produce one unit of output, generating less waste per output and improving waste segregation and management. However, material types and fractions play an important role in successfulness of recycling initiatives. This study investigates two main fractions in automotive industry, namely, metal and plastic. For both material flows, information availability and standards and regulations are pivotal to increase segregation, optimize the collection and obtain the highest possible circulation rates with high quality of recyclables. This paper presents and compares the current information flows and standards and regulations of metals and plastics in the automotive value chain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2022
National Category
Environmental Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-56778 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-77127-0_18 (DOI)
Available from: 2021-11-01 Created: 2021-11-01 Last updated: 2021-11-01Bibliographically approved
Hedman, M., Kurdve, M., Larsson, L. & Öhrwall Rönnbäck, A. (2022). Operator Contributions to Innovation: Supporting Innovative Production Development in a Digital Learning Environment. In: Advances in Transdisciplinary Engineering: . Paper presented at 10th Swedish Production Symposium, SPS 2022, 26 April 2022 through 29 April 2022 (pp. 580-591). IOS Press BV, 21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Operator Contributions to Innovation: Supporting Innovative Production Development in a Digital Learning Environment
2022 (English)In: Advances in Transdisciplinary Engineering, IOS Press BV , 2022, Vol. 21, p. 580-591Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

As all technologies come to pass, change by innovation is needed both ways, exploiting current knowledge to do better and exploring new knowledge to do differently. Due to years of continuous improvement (CI), exploitation of current knowledge in production development is rather well investigated, exploration is less. It could be argued that not utilizing the potential explorative operator contributions to production innovation is a lost opportunity to increase a company's innovation capability. Simultaneously, operators are facing great changes when manufacturing is adopting to digitalization and sustainability challenges enhancing the need for production innovation. This study focused on a team of operators through a workshop series of five sessions about explorative activities in a format using structured and semi-structured interviews. The study provided a basis for constructing a model for positioning operators' both digital and explorative maturity level. Through the empirical data and the model, the conclusion is illustrated as alternative pathways to reach a desired level of operator maturity. It was concluded that approaching digital and explorative maturity for operators should be done as a two-step process. Increasing both maturities simultaneously, as with the studied team, showed difficult due to the digital and explorative maturity being co-dependent. The suggested two-step process contributes to a better understanding of prerequisites and opportunities for operators to participate and contribute to production innovation in digitalized work environments, ultimately increasing the company's innovation capability. © 2022 The authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press BV, 2022
Keywords
online tools, Production development, production innovation, Computer aided instruction, E-learning, Manufacture, 'current, Continuous improvements, Digital learning environment, Innovation capability, Lost opportunities, Manufacturing IS, On-line tools, Two-step process, Sustainable development
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-59847 (URN)10.3233/ATDE220176 (DOI)2-s2.0-85132843000 (Scopus ID)9781614994398 (ISBN)
Conference
10th Swedish Production Symposium, SPS 2022, 26 April 2022 through 29 April 2022
Note

 Funding details: VINNOVA; Funding text 1: The project (2019-02957) was funded by Vinnova within Innovation management and organisation. The participating company is acknowledged. All authors contributed in initial research design, Interview design MH and MK, transcription MH, Empirical interviews and observations on-site MK.

Available from: 2022-08-02 Created: 2022-08-02 Last updated: 2022-08-09Bibliographically approved
Windmark, C., Ericson Åberg, A., Winroth, M., Almström, P., Kurdve, M. & Andersson, C. (2022). Sustainability with a Cost Perspective – Driving the Industry to Embrace Sustainable Thinking. Journal of Environmental Accounting and Management, 10(1), 49-72
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainability with a Cost Perspective – Driving the Industry to Embrace Sustainable Thinking
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Accounting and Management, ISSN 2325-6192, E-ISSN 2325-6206, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 49-72Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous research has shown that sustainable improvements need incentives to carry them through. An assumption is that it may be easier to incorporatesustainable thinking in an organization if the organization understandswhich actions it is that are having a positive effect on sustainability andon tangible costs. This paper aims to highlight the synergy effects thatoccur in the intersection between production costs, performance and sustainableimprovements and to present a possible way of modelling theseeffects. The study has used three methods of analysis: literature review, aweb survey sent to representatives in the Swedish manufacturing industry,and economic simulations using a case study. The literature review and thesurvey are used to identify important costs and incentives for sustainableimprovements. The study is limited to the production shop floor level, incorporatingonly aspects directly affecting, and affected by manufacturingoperations.This paper takes a holistic approach to sustainability drivers, cost driversin industry, and economic simulations, creating an overall insight. Fromthe literature review and the survey, intersections between sustainabilitymeasures and cost drivers could be found in the areas of site-occupancyarea/floor space, resource consumption, and efficiency. Apart from lawsand regulations, economic aspects and management attention are perceivedas the most important drivers, but also obstacles for sustainability improvements.The study aims to support industry to embrace sustainable thinking,presenting a quantitative method to visualize the synergy effects of sustainabilityand measurable improvements from production development,using performance measurements when estimating manufacturing costs.The possibility to connect manufacturing cost with environmental impact,through use of performance parameters is demonstrated in a case study;where the significant environmental and economic impact of rejections isanalyzed for the machining of steel frames.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
L and H Scientific Publishing, LLC, 2022
Keywords
cost-benefit analysis; economic impact; environmental economics; environmental impact; incentive; industrial performance; industrial production; literature review; manufacturing; quantitative analysis; sustainability; sustainable development, Sweden
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-68630 (URN)10.5890/JEAM.2022.03.006 (DOI)2-s2.0-85122595427 (Scopus ID)
Note

Fundinig: Vinnova, Formas and Swedish Energy Agency

Available from: 2023-12-19 Created: 2023-12-19 Last updated: 2023-12-19Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9068-3527

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