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Publications (10 of 40) Show all publications
Corrales-Pérez, B., Díaz-Ufano, C., Salvador, M., Santana-Otero, A., Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S., Beni, V. & Morales, M. d. (2024). Alternative Metallic Fillers for the Preparation of Conductive Nanoinks for Sustainable Electronics. Advanced Functional Materials
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alternative Metallic Fillers for the Preparation of Conductive Nanoinks for Sustainable Electronics
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2024 (English)In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The development of electronics with net zero carbon emissions through more efficient and environmentally friendly materials and processes is still a challenge. Here, alternative chemical synthesis routes of metal conductive nanoparticles, based on biodegradable materials are explored, such as nickel, iron–nickel alloy and iron nanoparticles, to be used, in the long term, as fillers in inks for inject printing. Thus, Ni and FeNi metal nanoparticles of 25–12 nm, forming aggregates of 614–574 nm, respectively, are synthesized in water in the presence of a polyol and a reducing agent and under microwave heating that enables a more uniform and fast heating. Iron nanoparticles of 120 ± 40 nm are synthesized in polyol that limits the aggregation and the oxidation degree. Commercial metal nanoparticles of iron and nickel, are coated with ethylene glycol and used for comparison. The conductivity of nanoparticles when pressed into pellets remains similar for both commercial and synthesized samples. However, when deposited on a strip line and heated, synthesized Ni, FeNi, and Fe nanoparticles show significant conductivity and interesting magnetic properties. It is demonstrated that the nanosize facilitates sintering at reduced temperatures and the capping agents prevent oxidation, resulting in promising conductive fillers for printed electronic applications. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley and Sons Inc, 2024
Keywords
Binary alloys; Conductive materials; Ethylene; Ethylene glycol; Fillers; Functional materials; Iron; Iron alloys; Microwave heating; Nanomagnetics; Nickel alloys; Sintering; Synthesis (chemical); Chemical synthesis method; Conductive nanoink; Magnetic metal nanopowder; Magnetic metals; Metal nanopowder; Microwave-heating; Nano-ink; Nanoinks; Polyol coating; Synthesis method; Metal nanoparticles
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-73610 (URN)10.1002/adfm.202405326 (DOI)2-s2.0-85194916315 (Scopus ID)
Note

B.C.P. and C.D.U. contributed equally to this work. This research wasfunded by the Spanish Ministry of Science, grant number PID2020-13480RB-I00 and TED2021-130191B-C43, and by the EU-commission,HORIZON-CL4-2021-DIGITAL-EMERGING-01 (HyPELignum), PROJECTNo.101070302 (2022-26). M.S. was supported by a Margarita Salas fel-lowship financed by the European Union-NextGenerationEU and thePlan for Recovery, Transformation and Resilience. Authors also acknowl-edge the Servicio Interdepartamental de Investigación at the Universi-dad Autónoma de Madrid, the TEM Service at the Centro de BiologíaMolecular Severo Ochoa (CBMSO, CSIC-UAM), SEM at MiNa Labora-tory (IMN, funding from CM (project S2018/NMT-4291 TEC2SPACE),MINECO (project CSIC13-4E-1794) and EU (FEDER, FSE)) and XRD, FTIR,the elemental and thermal analysis, and the characterization and growthof thin films service at ICMM/CSIC.

Available from: 2024-06-17 Created: 2024-06-17 Last updated: 2024-06-17Bibliographically approved
Petsagkourakis, I., Beni, V., Strandberg, J., Nilsson, M., Leandri, V., Lassen, B. & Sandberg, M. (2024). Polymerization of benzoxazine impregnated in porous carbons. A scalable and low-cost route to smart copper-ion absorbents with saturation indicator function. Process Safety and Environmental Protection, 184, 782-789
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Polymerization of benzoxazine impregnated in porous carbons. A scalable and low-cost route to smart copper-ion absorbents with saturation indicator function
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2024 (English)In: Process Safety and Environmental Protection, ISSN 0957-5820, E-ISSN 1744-3598, Vol. 184, p. 782-789Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Porous carbon materials are common materials used for sensor and absorbent applications. A novel approach for functionalizing porous carbons through the impregnation of porous carbon black with benzoxazine monomers, followed by thermal polymerization is introduced herein. The method not only establishes a new avenue for the functionalization of porous carbons but also endows the resulting material with both copper ion-binding and sensing properties. We showcase the versatility of the technique by illustrating that the polymerization of phenols with benzoxazine monomers serves as an extra tool to customize absorption- and sensing properties. Experimental validation involved testing the method on carbon black as a porous substrate, which was impregnated with both bisphenol-a benzoxazine and a combination of bisphenol-a benzoxazine and alizarin. The resulting materials were assessed for their dual functionality as both an absorbent and a sensor for copper ions by varied copper ion concentrations and exposure times. The dye absorption test demonstrated a notable capacity to accumulate copper ions from dilute solutions. Electrochemical characterization further confirmed the effectiveness of the modified carbons, as electrodes produced from inks were successful in detecting copper ions accumulated from 50 μM Cu2+ solutions. With this work, we aspire to set the steppingstone towards a facile functionalization of porous carbon materials towards water purification applications. © 2024 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institution of Chemical Engineers, 2024
Keywords
Absorption; Adsorbents; Carbon black; Costs; Impregnation; Metal ions; Monomers; Phenols; Polymerization; Porous materials; Absorbent; Benzoxazine; Benzoxazine monomers; Copper ions; Functionalizations; Modified carbon; Porous carbon materials; Porous carbons; Resulting materials; Sensing property; Copper
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-72816 (URN)10.1016/j.psep.2024.02.029 (DOI)2-s2.0-85185535302 (Scopus ID)
Note

This project is completely funded by The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research (Mistra), project name MISTRA TerraClean (project no. 2015/31).

Available from: 2024-05-14 Created: 2024-05-14 Last updated: 2024-06-25Bibliographically approved
Makhinia, A., Bynens, L., Goossens, A., Deckers, J., Lutsen, L., Vandewal, K., . . . Andersson Ersman, P. (2024). Toward Sustainability in All-Printed Accumulation Mode Organic Electrochemical Transistors. Advanced Functional Materials
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Toward Sustainability in All-Printed Accumulation Mode Organic Electrochemical Transistors
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2024 (English)In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Abstract This study reports on the first all-printed vertically stacked organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) operating in accumulation mode; the devices, relying on poly([4,4?-bis(2-(2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethoxy)ethoxy)-2,2?-bithiophen-5,5?-diyl]-alt-[thieno[3,2-b]thiophene-2,5-diyl]) (pgBTTT) as the active channel material, are fabricated via a combination of screen and inkjet printing technologies. The resulting OECTs (W/L ≈5) demonstrate good switching performance; gm, norm ≈13 mS cm?1, µC* ≈21 F cm?1 V?1 s?1, ON?OFF ratio > 104 and good cycling stability upon continuous operation for 2 h. The inkjet printing process of pgBTTT is established by first solubilizing the polymer in dihydrolevoglucosenone (Cyrene), a non-toxic, cellulose-derived, and biodegradable solvent. The resulting ink formulations exhibit good jettability, thereby providing reproducible and stable p-type accumulation mode all-printed OECTs with high performance. Besides the environmental and safety benefits of this solvent, this study also demonstrates the assessment of how the solvent affects the performance of spin-coated OECTs, which justifies the choice of Cyrene as an alternative to commonly used harmful solvents such as chloroform, also from a device perspective. Hence, this approach shows a new possibility of obtaining more sustainable printed electronic devices, which will eventually result in all-printed OECT-based logic circuits operating in complementary mode.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 2024
Keywords
green solvents, OECT, pgBTTT, printed electronics, sustainable
National Category
Materials Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-72318 (URN)10.1002/adfm.202314857 (DOI)2-s2.0-85187181832 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 964677Vinnova, 2023-01337
Note

This project received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement no. 964677 (MITICS). The authors would like to thank Jessica Åhlin for valuable electrolyte discussions. A.M. and P.A.E. thank Vinnova for financial support (grant agreement no. 2023-01337). W.M., L.B., and A.G. thank the FWO Vlaanderen for financial support (WEAVE project G025922N and Ph.D. grant 1S70122N)

Available from: 2024-03-11 Created: 2024-03-11 Last updated: 2024-05-23Bibliographically approved
Edberg, J., Boda, U., Mulla, Y., Brooke, R., Pantzare, S., Strandberg, J., . . . Armgarth, A. (2023). A Paper‐Based Triboelectric Touch Interface: Toward Fully Green and Recyclable Internet of Things. Advanced Sensor Research, 2(1), Article ID 2200015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Paper‐Based Triboelectric Touch Interface: Toward Fully Green and Recyclable Internet of Things
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2023 (English)In: Advanced Sensor Research, Vol. 2, no 1, article id 2200015Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The transition to a sustainable society is driving the development of green electronic solutions designed to have a minimal environmental impact. One promising route to achieve this goal is to construct electronics from biobased materials like cellulose, which is carbon neutral, non‐toxic, and recyclable. This is especially true for internet‐of‐things devices, which are rapidly growing in number and are becoming embedded in every aspect of our lives. Here, paper‐based sensor circuits are demonstrated, which use triboelectric pressure sensors to help elderly people communicate with the digital world using an interface in the form of an electronic “book”, which is more intuitive to them. The sensors are manufactured by screen printing onto flexible paper substrates, using in‐house developed cellulose‐based inks with non‐hazardous solvents. The triboelectric sensor signal, generated by the contact between a finger and chemically modified cellulose, can reach several volts, which can be registered by a portable microcontroller card and transmitted by Bluetooth to any device with an internet connection. Apart from the microcontroller (which can be easily removed), the whole system can be recycled at the end of life. A triboelectric touch interface, manufactured using printed electronics on flexible paper substrates, using cellulose‐based functional inks is demonstrated. These metal‐free green electronics circuits are implemented in an “electronic book” demonstrator, equipped with wireless communication that can control remote devices, as a step toward sustainable and recyclable internet‐of‐things devices.

National Category
Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-63313 (URN)10.1002/adsr.202200015 (DOI)
Note

The authors would like to acknowledge funding from Vinnova through theD igital Cellulose Competence Center (DCC), Diary number 2016–05193, the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (Smart Intra-body network; grant RIT15-0119), and the Norrköping municipality fund for research and development (Accessibility and remembering – storytelling and innovative media use in elderly care homes, 2020. Grant: KS 2020/0345). The work was also supported by Treesearch.se. The authors thank Patrik Isacsson and co-workers at Ahlstrom Munksjö for providing the paper substrates and for valuable know-how as part of the collaboration within DCC, as well as Erik Gabrielsson, Daniel Simon, Elisabet Cedersund, and Lars Herlogsson for their involvement in the work on the original Mediabook platform.

Available from: 2023-01-30 Created: 2023-01-30 Last updated: 2024-04-09Bibliographically approved
Sudheshwar, A., Beni, V., Malinverno, N., Hischier, R., Nevo, Y., Dhuiège, B., . . . Som, C. (2023). Assessing sustainability hotspots in the production of paper-based printed electronics. Flexible and Printed Electronics, 8(1), Article ID 015002.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing sustainability hotspots in the production of paper-based printed electronics
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2023 (English)In: Flexible and Printed Electronics, ISSN 2058-8585, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 015002Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Novel printed electronics are projected to grow and be manufactured in the future in large volumes. In many applications, printed electronics are envisaged as sustainable alternatives to conventional (PCB-based) electronics. One such application is in the semi-quantitative drug detection and point-of-care device called ‘GREENSENSE’ that uses paper-based printed electronics. This paper analyses the carbon footprint of GREENSENSE in order to identify and suggest means of mitigating disproportionately high environmental impacts, labeled ‘sustainability hotspots’, from materials and processes used during production which would be relevant in high-volume applications. Firstly, a life cycle model traces the flow of raw materials (such as paper, CNCs, and nanosilver) through the three ‘umbrella’ processes (circuit printing, component mounting, and biofunctionalization) manufacturing different electronic components (the substrate, conductive inks, energy sources, display, etc) that are further assembled into GREENSENSE. Based on the life cycle model, life cycle inventories are modeled that map out the network of material and energy flow throughout the production of GREENSENSE. Finally, from the environmental impact and sustainability hotspot analysis, both crystalline nanocellulose and nanosilver were found to create material hotspots and they should be replaced in favor of lower-impact materials. Process hotspots are created by manual, lab-, and pilot-scale processes with unoptimized material consumption, energy use, and waste generation; automated and industrial-scale manufacturing can mitigate such process hotspots. © 2023 The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Physics, 2023
Keywords
carbon footprint, life cycle assessment, printed electronics, sustainability hotspots, Environmental impact, Life cycle, Substrates, Sustainable development, Drug detection, Hotspots, Large volumes, Life cycle model, Nano silver, PCB-based, Point of care, Sustainability hotspot, Electronics, Energy, Paper, Production, Raw Materials
National Category
Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-63978 (URN)10.1088/2058-8585/acacab (DOI)2-s2.0-85146865282 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding details: Horizon 2020 Framework Programme, H2020, 761000; Funding text 1: This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under Grant Agreement No. 761000 GREENSENSE.

Available from: 2023-02-16 Created: 2023-02-16 Last updated: 2023-12-06Bibliographically approved
Mulla, Y., Isacsson, P., Dobryden, I., Beni, V., Östmark, E., Håkansson, K. & Edberg, J. (2023). Bio-Graphene Sensors for Monitoring Moisture Levels in Wood and Ambient Environment. Global Challenges, 7(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bio-Graphene Sensors for Monitoring Moisture Levels in Wood and Ambient Environment
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2023 (English)In: Global Challenges, E-ISSN 2056-6646, Vol. 7, no 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Wood is an inherently hygroscopic material which tends to absorb moisture from its surrounding. Moisture in wood is a determining factor for the quality of wood being employed in construction, since it causes weakening, deformation, rotting, and ultimately leading to failure of the structures resulting in costs to the economy, the environment, and to the safety of residents. Therefore, monitoring moisture in wood during the construction phase and after construction is vital for the future of smart and sustainable buildings. Employing bio-based materials for the construction of electronics is one way to mitigate the environmental impact of such electronics. Herein, a bio-graphene sensor for monitoring the moisture inside and around wooden surfaces is fabricated using laser-induced graphitization of a lignin-based ink precursor. The bio-graphene sensors are used to measure humidity in the range of 10% up to 90% at 25 °C. Using laser induced graphitization, conductor resistivity of 18.6 Ω sq−1 is obtained for spruce wood and 57.1 Ω sq−1 for pine wood. The sensitivity of sensors fabricated on spruce and pine wood is 2.6 and 0.74 MΩ per % RH. Surface morphology and degree of graphitization are investigated using scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis methods. © 2023 The Authors. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley and Sons Inc, 2023
Keywords
cellulose, humidity sensors, laser-induced graphene, lignin, moisture sensors, wood
National Category
Wood Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-64231 (URN)10.1002/gch2.202200235 (DOI)2-s2.0-85148603362 (Scopus ID)
Note

Article; Export Date: 15 March 2023; Correspondence Address: J. Edberg, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Sweden;

 The authors would like to acknowledge funding from Vinnova for the Digital Cellulose Competence Center (DCC), Diary number 2016–05193, as well as financial support from Stora Enso AB. The work was also supported by Treesearch.se. Dr. Robert Brooke is thankfully acknowledged for taking the picture and video for Figure 7 and Video S1 , Supporting Information respectively.

Available from: 2023-03-20 Created: 2023-03-20 Last updated: 2024-05-27Bibliographically approved
Andersson Ersman, P., Freitag, K., Nilsson, M., Åhlin, J., Brooke, R., Nordgren, N., . . . Beni, V. (2023). Electrochromic Displays Screen Printed on Transparent Nanocellulose-Based Substrates. Advanced Photonics Research, Article ID 2200012.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Electrochromic Displays Screen Printed on Transparent Nanocellulose-Based Substrates
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2023 (English)In: Advanced Photonics Research, ISSN 2699-9293, article id 2200012Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Manufacturing of electronic devices via printing techniques is often considered to be an environmentally friendly approach, partially due to the efficient utilization of materials. Traditionally, printed electronic components (e.g., sensors, transistors, and displays) are relying on flexible substrates based on plastic materials; this is especially true in electronic display applications where, most of the times, a transparent carrier is required in order to enable presentation of the display content. However, plastic-based substrates are often ruled out in end user scenarios striving toward sustainability. Paper substrates based on ordinary cellulose fibers can potentially replace plastic substrates, but the opaqueness limits the range of applications where they can be used. Herein, electrochromic displays that are manufactured, via screen printing, directly on state-of-the-art fully transparent substrates based on nanocellulose are presented. Several different nanocellulose-based substrates, based on either nanofibrillated or nanocrystalline cellulose, are manufactured and evaluated as substrates for the manufacturing of electrochromic displays, and the optical and electrical switching performances of the resulting display devices are reported and compared. The reported devices do not require the use of metals and/or transparent conductive oxides, thereby providing a sustainable all-printed electrochromic display technology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 2023
Keywords
electrochromic displays, nanocellulose, organic electronics, PEDOT:PSS, printed electronics
National Category
Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-59998 (URN)10.1002/adpr.202200012 (DOI)
Note

This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under the grant agreement no. 761000—GREENSENSE. Additional financial support was provided by the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (grant agreement no. EM16-0002).

Available from: 2022-08-26 Created: 2022-08-26 Last updated: 2023-12-06Bibliographically approved
Boda, U., Petsagkourakis, I., Beni, V., Andersson Ersman, P. & Tybrandt, K. (2023). Fully Screen-Printed Stretchable Organic Electrochemical Transistors. Advanced Materials Technologies (16), Article ID 2300247.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fully Screen-Printed Stretchable Organic Electrochemical Transistors
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2023 (English)In: Advanced Materials Technologies, E-ISSN 2365-709X, no 16, article id 2300247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Stretchable organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) are promising for wearable applications within biosensing, bio-signal recording, and addressing circuitry. Efficient large-scale fabrication of OECTs can be performed with printing methods but to date there are no reports on high-performance fully printed stretchable OECTs. Herein, this challenge is addressed by developing fully screen-printed stretchable OECTs based on an architecture that minimizes electrochemical side reactions and improves long-term stability. Fabrication of the OECTs is enabled by in-house development of three stretchable functional screen-printing inks and related printing processes. The stretchable OECTs show good characteristics in terms of transfer curves, output characteristics, and transient response up to 100% static strain and 500 strain cycles at 25% and 50% strain. The strain insensitivity of the OECTs can be further improved by strain conditioning, resulting in stable performance up to 50% strain. Finally, an electrochromic smart pixel is demonstrated by connecting a stretchable OECT to a stretchable electrochromic display. It is believed that the development of screen-printed stretchable electrochemical devices, and OECTs in particular, will pave the way for their use in wearable applications and commercial products. © 2023 The Authors. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley and Sons Inc, 2023
Keywords
organic electrochemical transistors, PEDOT:PSS, screen printing, soft electronics, stretchable electronics, stretchable transistors, Conducting polymers, Electrochromism, Flexible electronics, Transient analysis, Transistors, Wearable technology, Biosensing, Biosignals, PEDOT/PSS, Screen-printed, Signal recording, Stretchable transistor, Wearable applications
National Category
Textile, Rubber and Polymeric Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-64334 (URN)10.1002/admt.202300247 (DOI)2-s2.0-85151918312 (Scopus ID)
Note

Export Date: 17 April 2023; Article; Correspondence Address: Andersson Ersman, P.; RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Södra Grytsgatan 4, Sweden; email: peter.andersson.ersman@ri.se; Correspondence Address: Tybrandt, K.; RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Södra Grytsgatan 4, Sweden; email: klas.tybrandt@liu.se; Funding details: Stiftelsen för Strategisk Forskning, SSF; Funding details: Linköpings Universitet, LiU, 2009‐00971; Funding text 1: The authors thank Marie Nilsson at RISE Norrköping for assistance with printing and Covestro for generously providing Platilon TPU substrates and Baymedix PU solution. This project was financially supported by the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research and the Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Advanced Functional Materials at Linköping University (Faculty Grant SFO‐Mat‐LiU No. 2009‐00971).

Available from: 2023-04-21 Created: 2023-04-21 Last updated: 2024-06-07Bibliographically approved
Makhinia, A., Azizian, P., Beni, V., Casals-Terré, J., Cabot, J. & Andersson Ersman, P. (2023). On-Demand Inkjet Printed Hydrophilic Coatings for Flow Control in 3D-Printed Microfluidic Devices Embedded with Organic Electrochemical Transistors. Advanced Materials Technologies, 8(15), Article ID 2300127.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On-Demand Inkjet Printed Hydrophilic Coatings for Flow Control in 3D-Printed Microfluidic Devices Embedded with Organic Electrochemical Transistors
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2023 (English)In: Advanced Materials Technologies, E-ISSN 2365-709X, Vol. 8, no 15, article id 2300127Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Microfluidic surface chemistry can enable control of capillary-driven flow without the need for bulky external instrumentation. A novel pondered nonhomogeneous coating defines regions with different wetting properties on the microchannel walls. It changes the curvature of the liquid–air meniscus at various channel cross-sections and consequently leads to different capillary pressures, which is favorable in the strive toward automatic flow control. This is accomplished by the deposition of hydrophilic coatings on the surface of multilevel 3D-printed (3DP) microfluidic devices via inkjet printing, thereby retaining the surface hydrophilicity for at least 6 months of storage. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of capillary flow control in 3DP microfluidics enabled by inkjet printing. The method is used to create “stop” and “delay” valves to enable preprogrammed capillary flow for sequential release of fluids. To demonstrate further utilization in point-of-care sensing applications, screen printed organic electrochemical transistors are integrated within the microfluidic chips to sense, sequentially and independently from external actions, chloride anions in the (1–100) × 10−3 m range. The results present a cost-effective fabrication method of compact, yet comprehensive, all-printed sensing platforms that allow fast ion detection (<60 s), including the capability of automatic delivery of multiple test solutions. © 2023 The Authors. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley and Sons Inc, 2023
Keywords
3D-printing, capillary-driven microfluidics, hydrophilic coating, inkjet printing, OECT, 3D printing, Capillarity, Capillary flow, Chlorine compounds, Coatings, Cost effectiveness, Flow control, Hydrophilicity, Ink jet printing, Microfluidic chips, Wetting, 3-D printing, Capillary-driven microfluidic, Hydrophilic coatings, Ink jet, Ink-jet printing, Microfluidics devices, On demands, Organic electrochemical transistors, Microfluidics
National Category
Materials Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-65671 (URN)10.1002/admt.202300127 (DOI)2-s2.0-85163768709 (Scopus ID)
Note

Correspondence Address: P. Andersson Ersman; RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware, Printed, Bio- and Organic Electronics, Norrköping, 60233, Sweden.  

This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska‐Curie grant agreement no. 813863 (BORGES).

 

Available from: 2023-08-10 Created: 2023-08-10 Last updated: 2024-05-23Bibliographically approved
Freitag, K., Brooke, R., Nilsson, M., Åhlin, J., Beni, V. & Andersson Ersman, P. (2023). Screen Printed Reflective Electrochromic Displays for Paper and Other Opaque Substrates. ACS Applied Optical Materials, 1(2), 578-586
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Screen Printed Reflective Electrochromic Displays for Paper and Other Opaque Substrates
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2023 (English)In: ACS Applied Optical Materials, ISSN 2771-9855, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 578-586Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Paper electronics is a viable alternative to traditional electronics, leading to more sustainable electronics. Many challenges still require solutions before paper electronics become mainstream. Here, we present a solution to enable the manufacturing of reflective all-printed organic electrochromic displays (OECDs) on paper substrates; devices that are usually printed on transparent substrates, for example, plastics. In order to operate on opaque paper substrates, an architecture for reversely printed OECDs (rOECDs) is developed. In this architecture, the electrochromic layer is printed as the last functional layer and can therefore be viewed from the print side. Square shaped 1 cm2 rOECDs are successfully screen printed on paper, with a high manufacturing yield exceeding 99%, switching times <3 s and high color contrast (ΔE* > 27). Approximately 60% of the color is retained after 15 min in open-circuit mode. Compared to the conventional screen printed OECD architectures, the rOECDs recover approximately three times faster from storage in a dry environment, which is particularly important in systems where storage in low humidity atmosphere is required, for example, in many biosensing applications. Finally, a more complex rOECD with 9 individually addressable segments is successfully screen printed and demonstrated.

National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-64117 (URN)10.1021/acsaom.2c00140 (DOI)
Available from: 2023-03-01 Created: 2023-03-01 Last updated: 2023-06-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6889-0351

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